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By: Zane Cooper Jeff Shagena Andrew Olinger.  Minor crimes included drunkenness, vagrancy, and wandering around without employment  Major crimes included.

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Presentation on theme: "By: Zane Cooper Jeff Shagena Andrew Olinger.  Minor crimes included drunkenness, vagrancy, and wandering around without employment  Major crimes included."— Presentation transcript:

1 By: Zane Cooper Jeff Shagena Andrew Olinger

2  Minor crimes included drunkenness, vagrancy, and wandering around without employment  Major crimes included murder, any rape that resulted in death, and major burglary

3  In the court systems, judges and prosecutors had much more power  Criminals were treated very poorly in prison, as they were considered the lowest social class  The “silent system” was later induced in the prisons, along with hard labor

4  Hanging was the main form of capital punishment, but people were being hanged for stupid crimes like stealing onions  Transportation was also a main form of capital punishment

5  Crimes such as homicide, rape, violent robberies, etc.  However, due to the judicial corruption, anybody could be sentenced to capital punishment

6  Policemen  Sir Robert Peel  Father of modern policing  Metropolitan Police Force  Peelian Principles

7  Early 1800s - Criminals were considered to be only lower, working class members who wanted to live an “easy life”  Mid-1800s - only the poor were considered criminals  Could be discerned just by appearance  Late 1800s – criminals had behavior problems or were not raised well  Social Darwinism became popular

8  Headquarters of Metropolitan Police  Colonel Charles Rowan and Richard Mayne

9  Central Criminal Court of England and Wales  Next to Newgate Prison

10  Infamous prison used for centuries  Demolished in 1904  Became the site of London’s gallows in 1783  London’s main prison  Terrible conditions for especially women and children

11  Pre-1800s  Often viewed as a sympathetic hero  Post-1800s  No more sympathy  Shifted towards detectives

12  The half strangling of unwary pedestrians from behind.  Very common crime  Commonly practiced by two people. One attacker and one robber.  Attacker would strangle a person from behind while the robber stripped the person of valuables and money.  Caused wide spread panic in London

13  Late 1880’s  London – East Quarter – Whitechapel  77,000 People  Large Jewish immigrant population  Resentment  Unsanitary  Poverty  Crime  Highest death rate  Prostitution

14  Mary Ann Nicholls – 3:40 AM – August 31 st Charles Cross – Bucks Row – PC (Police Constable) John Neil  Annie Chapman – 6:00 AM – September 8 th - John Davis – Hanbury Street – The Leather Apron  Elizabeth Stride – 1:00 AM – September 30 th - Louis Deimshutz – Berners Street

15  Catharine Eddowes – Three Jewish Men 1:35 AM – September 30 th – PC Watkins 1:45 AM – Mitre Square  The Mysterious Message  PC Alfred Long – Eddowes Apron – “The Juwes are the men That Will be blamed for nothing”  Mary Kelly – November 9 th - George Hitchinson 2:00 AM – Dorset Street –Cries of Murder! 4:00 AM - 10:45 Thomas Bowyer

16  Hatred of Jews – Leather Apron incidents  Xenophobia and Anti-Semitism  Fear and suspicion strikes the people of London.  Sensationalist coverage  Letters  Failure of the police  Social Reforms

17   godfrey/stranglehold-victorian-society godfrey/stranglehold-victorian-society  banerjee1.html banerjee1.html  walk.co.uk/jack_the_ripper_history.htm walk.co.uk/jack_the_ripper_history.htm  rippers-murders-affect-london rippers-murders-affect-london


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