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Invasive Plants May 26, 2010 Scott Griffin Interim Forest Health Coordinator Georgia Forestry Commission Gainesville, GA.

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Presentation on theme: "Invasive Plants May 26, 2010 Scott Griffin Interim Forest Health Coordinator Georgia Forestry Commission Gainesville, GA."— Presentation transcript:

1 Invasive Plants May 26, 2010 Scott Griffin Interim Forest Health Coordinator Georgia Forestry Commission Gainesville, GA

2 Invasive Plants Major invasive plants impacting forestry in the South…

3 Top 12 Species* RankSpecies or Genera 1Non-native Privet 2non-native Lespedeza 3kudzu 4Chinaberry 5Japanese Climbing Fern 6Tallowtree 7non-native Roses 8non-native Olives 9chinese/japanese wisteria 10napalese browntop 11Mimosa 12Cogongrass Top 11 species removing honeysuckle and fescue The Dirty Dozen

4 Chinese Tallowtree ( Triadica sebifera )

5 Tallowtree, Popcorntree Triadica sebifera Not Detected < 10 Percent of Subplots In a County Occupied USDA Forest Service SRS FIA database March 2008 Miller and Chambliss, Auburn

6 Chinese Tallowtree ( Triadica sebifera )

7 Non-native roses ( Rosa spp. )

8 Nonnative Roses Rosa spp. Not Detected < 10 Percent of Subplots In a County Occupied USDA Forest Service SRS FIA database March 2008 Miller and Chambliss, Auburn

9 Japanese Climbing Fern ( Lygopodium japonicum )

10 Japanese Climbing Fern Lygodium japonicum Not Detected < 10 Percent of Subplots In a County Occupied USDA Forest Service SRS FIA database March 2008 Miller and Chambliss, Auburn

11 Japanese Climbing Fern 1.Dies back in late winter 2.Dead vines providing a trellis for reestablishment.

12 Japanese Climbing Fern – fire hazard

13 Japanese Climbing Fern – impacts straw industry…

14 Chinese Privet ( Ligustrum spp )

15 Percent of Subplots In a County Occupied Not Detected < 10 USDA Forest Service SRS FIA database March 2008 Miller and Chambliss, Auburn All Invasive Privets Ligustrum spp.

16 Chinese Privet – invasion began long ago…

17 Winter Foliar Treatment – glyphosate 3-5% AprilFebruary

18 Chinese Privet invades upland areas too… Numerous low-growing small stems in pine stand = good choice for broadcast understory treatment Burning may be good first step ® Escort XP ® (1 ounce per acre) – high volume

19 Chinese Privet control options Foliar Treatments: Escort XP ® (1 oz per acre % non-ionic surfactant) High Volume Broadcast. Good choice for pine stands but may damage hardwood overstory (Ash, Elm, Dogwood and Cherry are susceptible to root uptake from Escort). Growing season. Glyphosate (2-5% solution with water) applied as a directed foliage spray DURING THE DORMANT SEASON. Good choice for hardwood stands with numerous sprouts or stands with desirable plants near privet. 41% active ingredient products. Accord Concentrate ® (up to 7 pints per acre) applied aerially DURING THE DORMANT SEASON (within piedmont region – GFC trial). 54% active ingredient product labeled for areas where standing water occurs.

20 Chinese Privet control options Cut Surface Treatments: as a cut surface or injected into the cambium. Safe around desirable trees where privet must be removed. Krenite ® (mixed with water plus surfactant) Arsenal AC ® (5% solution with water plus surfactant) Glyphosate (mixed with water) – 41% active ingredient products Garlon 3A ® (20% solution with water plus surfactant) Basal Bark Treatments: Safe around desirable trees where privet must be removed. Garlon 4 ® (20% plus crop oil) applied as a basal bark treatment. Good treatment option for large privet with single stems and bushy canopy. Other Considerations: Privet eradication will take at least 2 treatments over 2 growing seasons Most privet seed will germinate within one year of maturing Re-sprouts should be at least 24” before treating

21 What is the First Step in Eradication?

22 Aerial Privet trial in Mature Hardwood Forests Glyphosate treatment applied via helicopter in the dormant season Major Questions? Will it damage the hardwood overstory? Can it provide an initial control of privet?

23 Aerial Privet trial in Mature Hardwood Forests

24 Aerial Privet trial - Methods Sites selected at 2 state parks (Fort Yargo and Hard Labor Creek) 2 Treatment areas on each park established 3% & 6% solutions of Accord Concentrate ® (54% ai) 3% (0.45 gpa) & 6% (0.9 gpa) 0.5% Entry II ® surfactant (0.075 gpa) 15 gallons / acre applied February 6 & 7, 2009

25 Aerial Privet trial - Application

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27 Aerial Privet trial – plots… 3 plots established in each area 1/10 th acre circular plots Plot location insure all major tree species would be represented All trees measured – species, dbh, health condition 5 or more 1” dbh privet measured and tagged / plot Privet regeneration measured within 3’ radius of plot center

28 Aerial Privet trial – Tree Composition

29 Aerial Privet trial – Fort Yargo plots (Trees) Tree common namesScientific Names Black CherryPrunus serotina Black GumNyssa sylvatica Black WillowSalix nigra Box ElderAcer negundo Eastern HophornbeanOstyra virginiana Green AshFraxinus pennsylvanica Hazel AlderAlnus serrulata Loblolly PinePinus Taeda PersimmonDiospyros virginiana Red MapleAcer rubrum River BirchBetula nigra Slippery ElmUlmus rubra SweetgumLiquidambar styraciflua SycamorePlatanus occidentalis Water OakQuercus nigra Winged ElmUlmus alata Yellow PoplarLiriodendron tulipifera

30 Aerial Privet trial – Fort Yargo plots Condition Condition %6%3%6% All Trees Fort Yargo Hard Labor * Condition Scores: 1dead Privet ( greater than 1" dbh) 2more than 50% canopy dieback Fort Yargo less than 50% canopy dieback Hard Labor healthy Privet (regeneration/acre)Stems Per Acre * Persimmon impact Fort Yargo52,0868,938 Hard Labor14,3313,852

31 Aerial Privet trial – privet impact Dead Healthy

32 Aerial Privet trial – tree impact

33 Aerial Privet trial – privet regeneration impact

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36 Aerial Privet trial – final thoughts Treatments at both concentrations had significant impact on the privet Privet regeneration was also impacted Neither concentration impacted tree canopy (except Persimmon) Privet is not eradicated…must follow-up with ground treatments Seed remain viable for 1 growing season Aerial cost is similar (or cheaper) than ground applications $170 / acre - 6% $150 / acre - 3% (GFC costs $65/acre) Treatment window may vary each year – overstory dormancy is critical Avoid below freezing applications Coastal plain trial – winter 2009 – 2010 (magnolia, sweetbay, switch cane)

37 Partnerships & Thanks! Dow AgroSciences

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