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Engagement & Stewardship to Revenue Development More Than Publicity 1 Social Media In College Athletics.

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Presentation on theme: "Engagement & Stewardship to Revenue Development More Than Publicity 1 Social Media In College Athletics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Engagement & Stewardship to Revenue Development More Than Publicity 1 Social Media In College Athletics

2 B.S. Colby-Sawyer, 2000 ALB Harvard, 2009 Stanford 2013-present Senior Assistant Athletic Director Harvard Assistant Athletic Director Saint Anselm Director, Athletic Communications Franklin Pierce Assistant Director, Sports Information 2 Social Media In College Athletics

3 Public Affairs & Media Relations Department Spokesperson Integrate Relationships Influence Dialog 36 Varsity Sports General Council University Communications Athletic Director Development/ Fundraising Alumni Relations Ticket Sales Marketing Facilities Events Pac-12 Networks 3 Social Media In College Athletics

4 Big Day Social Media In College Athletics  Background  Landscape  Going  Strategic  Data  Bandwidth  Budget  Fear/ FOMO/ Education Engagement & Stewardship to Revenue Development More Than Publicity

5 Big Day Social Media In College Athletics  First Things First  #CSCESS  Tagboard.com/CSCESS  Selfies  Questions  Comments  Jokes Engagement & Stewardship to Revenue Development More Than Publicity

6 Background – Evolving Communications Social Media In College Athletics

7 Background – Evolving Communications Social Media In College Athletics  Campus Phone to Mobile  Consider  How many Addys? Why?  AOL/ IM  5 C’s (+1!)  Compliance  Text/ Phone/ Twitter/ Snap!  Consumption  Rotary?  Conversation  Connection → Community  → DASH for CA$H

8 Key Thought: Community Social Media In College Athletics

9 Current Landscape Social Media In College Athletics

10 Current Landscape Social Media In College Athletics

11 Social Media In College Athletics

12 Current Landscape Social Media In College Athletics  Hey!

13 Current Landscape Social Media In College Athletics  Crowded

14 Current Landscape Social Media In College Athletics  Distracted

15 Current Landscape Social Media In College Athletics  Recruit Me!  Come Here!

16 Social Media In College Athletics

17 | *information courtesy ExpandedRamblings.com Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics  Sports = Mobile  100m active Twitter users | 5/day | 184M mobile monthly users

18 Current Landscape Social Media In College Athletics  Me  Just got a great workout in  Lunch was fab!  I’m up early. finna get this money!  Wattup Twitter??  Gotta go to work!

19 Social Media In College Athletics

20 Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics

21 Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics  Publicity Hunt MUST < Community  Engagement → Stewardship → Data → Development = Community

22 Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics  Publicity Hunt MUST < Community  Engagement → Stewardship → Data → Development = Community #NerdNation

23 Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics  Publicity Hunt MUST < Community  Engagement → Stewardship → Data → Development = Community #NerdNation

24 Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics  Publicity Hunt MUST < Community  Engagement → Stewardship → Data → Development = Community ↓ Analytics ↓ Informed Decisions ↓ Better Communications ↓ Better Marketing ↓ = + ↑ Ticket Sales, Donations ↓ Better Development →→→→→ →→→→→ →→→→→ ↑ Better ↑ ↑ Better ↑ ↑ ← ← ← ← Bias, anyone?

25 | *information courtesy DigitalRoyalty.com Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics  Attention!  2013 – 8 seconds  2000 – 12 seconds  Goldfish – 9 seconds  Our Story  Get Point Across  Rich Media  Simple  Sharable  Call To Action

26 Reality – Where Are We Going? Social Media In College Athletics  Our Story  Get Point Across  Rich Media  Simple  Sharable  Call To Action

27 | *information courtesy DigitalRoyalty.com Strategic Thinking Social Media In College Athletics  Strategic  Data  Recruiting  Bandwidth  Budget  Where is the Experience?  Fear/ FOMO/ Education

28 Strategic Thinking – Data Social Media In College Athletics  Publicity Hunt MUST < Community

29 Strategic Thinking – Data Social Media In College Athletics  Data  Step Back  Questions  What Are We in (Social Media) Business For?  Who Is our Audience?  What Are our Goals?  What Are Our Key Messaging Points?  What Is My Voice? My Unique Things?  DATA! → Audience (um, who?)  Human - #NerdNation vs. Tough  What Are My Tools?  How Will I Execute? Types? Frequency?  How Will In Interpret Metrics  DATA! → Audience (um, who?)

30 Strategic Thinking – Data Social Media In College Athletics  Data  What Data?  Questions  What Are We in (Social Media) Business For?  Answers Vary  Education  Athletic and Personal Development  Community  Accessible  Role Modeling  Visible In Technology = Visible In Recruiting  Revenue Generation  Ticket Sales  Donations | Gifts |Other  Winning  The Home of Champions

31 | * Amanda Vandervort, Director of Social Media, MLS Strategic Thinking – Data Social Media In College Athletics  Data  What Data?  Questions  What Are We in (Social Media) Business For?  Answers Vary  Education (Athletic and Personal Development)  Community (Accessible, Modeling, Recruiting)  Revenue Generation (Ticket Sales, Donations, Gifts, Other)  Winning (The Home of Champions)  MLS*  Grow Fan Base  = More People Watching on TV  = More People Attending Games  = More People Consuming Content  = More People Wearing Team Gear

32 Strategic Thinking – Customer Data Social Media In College Athletics

33 Strategic Thinking – Customer Data Social Media In College Athletics Google searches for “college football” occur more frequently in the Midwest and South than in other parts of the United States, on a per capita basis.

34 Strategic Thinking – Customer Data Social Media In College Athletics Local Google search activity in the Bay Area for “Cal” and “football” than “Stanford” and “football” Google searches for “Cal” and “Football”Google searches for “Stanford” and “Football” Berkeley, CA Stanford, CA

35 Stanford – My Unique Things Social Media In College Athletics  Football Recruiting vs. Marketing  World of Different Lenses

36 Stanford – My Unique Things Social Media In College Athletics  Football Recruiting vs. Marketing  The Sitch

37 Stanford – My Unique Things Social Media In College Athletics  The Sitch: Football Recruiting vs. Marketing  Audience Members | Who Will Join Our Community? Why?  John – Traditionalist  Jane – Creative Class  Sumi – Alpha Mom  Luis – Middle Class  Chuma – Recruit  Rose – Stanford Mis/Disconnects  One Size Does Not Fit All = Deep Dive  Internal Sell  Budget  Bandwidth  Straight Expense vs. Investment lens  “People don’t buy from brands, they buy from people they know and trust.” - Michael Idinopulos, CMO, PeopleLinx

38 Social Media In College Athletics Stanford – My Unique Things

39 Social Media In College Athletics

40 Social Media In College Athletics

41 Stanford – Social Media Awareness Social Media In College Athletics Social media and networking have changed the way we interact today. Everything happens rapidly in a here- and-now social forum. When using social media for personal or professional use (including student-athletes), be sure to utilize the R.A.P.I.D. principle: RESPECTFUL Be respectful of others and don’t assume their intentions. Kill them with kindness if need be. AUTHENTIC Reach others on a personal level; be “real.” POSITIVE Stay positive above all, especially bad news, after tough losses and stressful situations. INTELLIGENT Represent Stanford University and yourself intelligently. DISTINCTIVE Be distinctly you. What do want other people’s takeaway about you to be?

42 | * Amanda Vandervort, Director of Social Media, MLS Voice – MLS* Social Media In College Athletics  Confident, not Authoritative  Approachable, not too Familiar  Entertaining, but not Silly  Focused on Visual Content  Offers/ Contests  Customer Service  Promotion  News  Behind-Scenes

43 Where Is The Experience? Social Media In College Athletics

44 | * Wall Street Journal | ** Darren Rovelle Where Is The Experience? Social Media In College Athletics  All Over  Twitter = Real-Time  TV = Attendance Decline  Alabama (32%)*  Arizona 2013 (48%)**

45 Where Is The Experience? Social Media In College Athletics  In-Venue  Experience > Game  Community Experiences  Glass  What Apps?  Extension of Behavior  Access  Concessions  Value  Connectivity / Infrastructure

46 Social Media In College Athletics

47 | * Wall Street Journal | ** Darren Rovelle Fear/ FOMO/ Education Social Media In College Athletics  Fear  Emerging Technologies  FOMO  Silicon Valley  Name = Expectations  Education  Students Are #1

48 | * Wall Street Journal | ** Darren Rovelle Thanks Social Media In College Athletics

49 Stanford – Social Media Strategy Social Media In College Athletics 1. Every moment is a job interview. Be respectful. Anything you post in your role as a University employee reflects either positively or negatively on the University. Be professional and respectful. 2. Each task is a chance to show pride in who/what you represent. Stanford University, the Athletic Department, family, YOURSELF, church, organization, etc. 3. If you can’t say it in front of your grandmother, then don’t say it. If you have any hesitancy about saying or posting a comment because of the above rule, skip it. 4. Get your ears on. “Listen,” of follow to online conversations on your preferred tools to maintain a current understanding of what is relevant and of interest to the community. At present time, Twitter is a handy tool for seeing topics and coverage up-to-the-minute. 5. Be active. Because news is covered by the minute, we should engage and be active on social media. Going weeks without a post makes you irrelevant. 6. Twitter is a telephone, not a megaphone. Professionally, don’t use it to dictate, use it to listen as well. Handles that don’t follow/engage with others are megaphones. Personally, don’t use it as an outlet to complain about your life. 7. Cross promote Use your status in the department to call attention to all the programs, people around us - athletic or otherwise. Engage with the world- wide Stanford community. Do a quick Twitter search for “Stanford” and see for yourself. 8. We all lose in Twitter arguments. Ignore them and don’t engage in any. 9. What happens in the locker room stays there. Don’t tweet or post something about a heated exchange - anywhere. Things said in private should remain private.

50 THE SOCIAL MEDIA PHILOSOPHY The continued growth of social media has changed manner with which recruits, fans, communities and media consume and spread information. As such, athletic departments must adjust long-held communications strategies and meet our users where and when they wish to engage. In addition to utilizing traditional media outlets, we have a unique ability to tell our own story and use multiple platforms and techniques to tell that story in a variety of ways. We need our social media presence to be highly interactive and a two-way conversation – not a one-way advertisement or information push. Think of it like this: Twitter and other social media platforms are NETWORKING opportunities – they are telephones, not megaphones. We will position GoStanford.com and our social media accounts as THE hub of all Cardinal content as well as the official source. We will leverage our access to the programs and position as the content owner to promote our brand. We will engage with our fans, listen to and lead the conversation about our department, amplify key messaging and steward our advocates. We will promote and engage with our student-athletes online, within California State laws and NCAA regulations, and deliver a long-term relationship that will strengthen their affinity for their University. Goals and Strategy: Fan engagement/ Stanford community/ Local communities/ Bay Area Listen to and lead the conversation Spread our Information and amplify messaging Position ourselves as the official source Promote our student-athletes and steward them through their time at Stanford Engage and promote all University athletic programs and initiatives Partner with campus departments in promoting the larger Stanford mission. We will also use our personal, non-school Twitter accounts to be additional voices in promoting not only your personal brand but also the Stanford Cardinal brand. We are an information source, but engagement and interaction is paramount in amplifying our message. While we will use our non-affiliated outlets to be additional voices and serve as a necessary informational source to the media and key followers, we will never break Stanford news on our personal channels. Breaking news and new information are the exclusive right of the platforms which we represent. Social Media In College Athletics

51 PLATFORMS Social media and networking have changed the way people consume and share information. We intend to reach people where and how they are communicating and do so across multiple platforms. With ever-changing and growing social networks we must continuously evaluate best practices for different platforms with an eye towards doing some things very well and not necessarily being on all platforms. Various platforms have different strengths and areas of focus, and we need to maximize our limited time appropriately. When evaluating new tools, we need to see where they fit within our strategy and prioritize resources when choosing where to focus our social media efforts. This should be an ongoing conversation with welcome input from all corners of the department. Good ideas are everywhere and we will be receptive to all input. FACEBOOK Our Facebook goal is to create an engaging and interactive fan community, showcasing the many impressive stories of Stanford student-athletes as well as the many opportunities for fans to showcase their support and affinity for this great University. While we want to share content and information, we don’t want pages to be merely a duplication of our website. Facebook’s EdgeRank algorithm demands that posts be engaging to generate likes, comments, and shares by fans to ensure our content appears in fans’ news feeds. Additionally, we do not want to saturate the Facebook marketplace. As a rule of thumb, do not post more than one Facebook entry within a two-hour span (longer if possible) – this avoids us from posting too much and spamming. If you schedule a post for a certain time, alert the rest of the group so we know. Main Stanford Athletics Facebook Page: GOAL STRATEGY SAMPLE FACEBOOK TACTICS Fan Engagement and Appreciation Post interactive and engaging content Fan photos, ask open-ended questions Provide customer service Answering fans’ questions, providing customer service options, commenting back and leading the conversation Enhance and Promote the Brand Represent and share the brand in a Sample cover photos, marketing visual, engaging wayimages, branded action images Spread Information/Amplify messaging News and promotion Big wins/game results, player awards, original content, highlight videos, ticket information Individual Program Facebook Pages: The goal with individual sport pages is to provide fans a more in-depth look at an individual team than provided on the main page. Not all sports have individual pages but we will work with team personnel to create pages in accordance with department policy. The same goals as above apply with the addition of the following: GOAL STRATEGY SAMPLE FACEBOOK TACTICS Provide look inside the program Leverage access; behind-the-scenes Some revenue generation needs (football, volleyball, basketball, baseball)and insider content Photos from travel, pre-game, facilities Complete coverage of that team’s eventsIn-game updates/results, game pre views and event promotion Social Media In College Athletics

52 TWITTER Our goal with Twitter is to be a quick, go-to source of official information. All of our news should be distributed via Twitter via our official accounts simultaneously or immediately surrounding being posted to our website and prior to being ed to media. Fan questions should be answered in timely manner to position ourselves as a customer service resource and good source. Fan engagement and leading the conversation is a priority. Another top priority is engagement and promotion of our student-athletes. Twitter handles should be used whenever possible in tweets containing their names. Cross promotion between sports and our students will create a wholesome online community. For , we will begin offering social media workshops to specific student-athletes with the intent of featuring those individuals who complete training. Featured individuals will receive branded twitter pages and additional status in promoted materials (i.e.schedule posters, website). Ideally all tweets would be done manually, but we will also use Twitter feed to generate automated tweets of all releases posted to GoStanford.com to ensure that they are all tweeted. All of our general social media goals apply with Twitter with the addition of the following: GOAL STRATEGY SAMPLE TWITTER TACTICS Position our accounts as the official Own our stories and content first source for information Vine video APP Promote our programs, S-A, profiles whenever possibleWay to Post to Twitter before ing media Provide customer service Answer fan questions in a timely manner Fan Engagement and Appreciation Join and lead the conversation Search for conversations with #GoStanford, #Stanford, #NerdNation or search player names to retweet Social Media In College Athletics

53 RT sport-specific content Department news General contests/promos In-game engagement for certain sports (Football/ high-level others) Final scores/results Fan engagement Event reminders | Revenue generation Tone Official but authentic and accessible Fun, engaging for fans and current student-athletes Frequency Varies (engagement) Less is more for content (support team handles) Social Media In College Athletics Individual Sports (acts as team voice): Recruiting Revenue generation as appropriate Breaking news | official information Live updates (notables) Event reminders Behind the Scenes/team-centric photos and videos Alumni/ fan/ student-athlete engagement Tone Official and serious Engaging for responses and fan interaction Frequency Frequent on engagement for news, “inside looks” Moderate for alumni engagement Low for current S-A personal engagements

54 YOUTUBE YouTube as a video platform encourages sharing and enhances chances of our videos being seen by a wide group of people over a longer period of time. The YouTube community is especially important to Stanford as it provides a unique way to reach a significant number of constituents that might not be actively looking for Stanford content. Reaching this audience will be accomplished through the incredibly high standard that our Creative Video team has established as well as a refined focus on key words and increased promotion on GoStanford,com. Videos that are “evergreen” and will hold interest over a longer period of time are posted to our YouTube channel and organized in playlists by sport and type. Types of videos include highlights, features and hype or promotional videos. News conference or media availability videos are not typically posted to YouTube but can be depending on the event. INSTAGRAM Instagram is a photo-based social network growing in popularity. We can use it to host and tweet pictures from the Twitter account. All photos are tagged with #GoStanford, #Stanford or #NerdNation to increase the likelihood of fans finding them via search. Instagram is almost entirely mobile app-based and supports our presence in the mobile space. Our accounts are limited to GoStanford and StanfordFBall for the season and we are solely focused on QUALITY rather than QUANTITY. Only, professional, artistic and thoughtful images will be used. GOOGLE+ Our Google+ profile (GoStanford) is a new offering that has quickly become our largest social media community. It is a community made up largely of unaffiliated individuals and therefor offers tremendous opportunity to promote our Key Messaging Points as an introduction to our brand. PINTEREST Our Pinterest profile (GoStanfordCard) is a placeholder to protect our brand in the space while evaluating its place in our social media strategy and whether it will be an area of growth. Social Media In College Athletics

55 Corporate external posts are coordinated through our sponsorship partnership with Cardinal Sports LLC Properties. We are sensitive to both protecting the value of our social media audience as well as protecting the integrity of our relationship with them. We have guidelines to determine whether a sponsored post is appropriate or permissible. With the growth in social media we get regular requests from external parties to post their content to our social media accounts. We must be discerning and careful about which, if any, we post in order to protect our social media sponsorship value and our sponsors. We discourage posting items related to a business that is not a sponsor with the following guidelines considered: If the post or promotion is from a business that directly competes with one of our sponsors, it should not be hosted or retweeted by any of our official accounts. Examples: Tweet mentioning a local restaurant that directly competes with a CSP sponsors (i.e. pizza company vs. California Pizza Kitchen) If the post or promotion provides a direct benefit to a student-athlete or program, it may be posted. Examples: Winning mascot of the Capital One Mascot Challenge receives a $20,000 scholarship; some major awards for athletics achievement now include a fan voting component Promotions that require an address or Facebook “Like” for a user to enter are not likely to be approved. That provides valuable data to the company without a sponsorship. STUDENT-ATHLETE INTEGRATION We should make every effort mention/tag, or re-tweet/share student-athlete social media accounts as long as they are PUBLIC ACCOUNTS. Current California State laws prohibit employees from requesting to “follow” private accounts of students or requesting friend invitations on Facebook. Many in the public space have found the social media accounts of our student-athletes and are following and sharing their content regardless of any promotion or confirmation from us. Fake impersonation accounts have also become prevalent for several high-profile student- athletes. Student-athletes often post positive tweets about their team or being a student at Stanford that we would benefit from sharing. Additionally, our students can cross promote our other programs with an authentic tone unique to their standing in the community. For that reason and in order to provide education at all levels of the athletic department, we will aim to offer social networking workshops for select individuals and, in turn, officially promote them on department collateral. These student-athletes will be held to a higher standard for their content. Social Media In College Athletics

56 WE WANT FACULTY AND STAFF TO: Become brand champions and storytellers Promote Stanford’s athletic accomplishments as a point of pride for the entire University WE WANT STUDENTS TO: Promote the Stanford brand with friends, family and peers in other academic and athletic settings Become a Stanford storyteller in social media (#gostanford) Become engaged in games and events WE WANT ALUMNI TO: Understand Stanford’s value to the NCAA’s mission, the nation and world at large Lend their passion and commitment to Stanford athletics Assist our student-athletes in career advice, services and opportunities Be inspired to donate to the athletic department Encourage high school students to aspire to Stanford, to make ourselves accessible in their eyes and, ultimately, to apply to the university WE WANT PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS TO: Understand the value of a Stanford education and promote the Stanford brand among friends and family members Recognize Stanford for its extensive leadership initiatives and community engagement opportunities Be inspired by the Stanford brand, believe an educational opportunity here to be attainable and apply for admission WE WANT FANS AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO: Promote the Stanford brand with friends and family members Gain understanding and a feeling of accesibility for Stanford Promote these in social media WE WANT COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO: Understand the university’s contributions to solving problems in the community and the state Understand how the university contributes socially and economically to the Peninsula Promote the Stanford brand to others in the community Attend games and engage with our student-athletes in the community WE WANT MEDIA TO: Tell our stories of scholarly and athletic excellence at the highest level of Division I athletics Advocate for Stanford’s importance to the future of NCAA sport Rely on Stanford’s athletic communication staff experts for research, information and creative story/ feature opportunities Promote the Stanford brand in professional and social activities See Stanford coaches, students and administrators as qualified and prepared as leaders and experts in their respective fields Collaborate with Stanford in community engagement opportunities Social Media In College Athletics

57 Key Messaging Points 1)Stanford Athletics is the national leader in combining academic and athletic excellence. The integration of academics and athletics at Stanford is the singular example of what can be achieved without making compromises to the broader enterprise of interscholastic athletics. Stanford student-athletes achieve elite competitive success while making an uncompromising commitment to rigorous academic pursuit. 2) Stanford student-athletes are exceptionally prepared to make future positive contributions to society. Academic and athletic pursuits provide complementary learning opportunities; the critical reasoning skills and analytical learning in the classroom or lab complement the leadership, teamwork and sportsmanship skills that student-athletes need on the field or court. The rigor of these experiences lays the foundation for lifelong success. Student-athletes at Stanford are fully integrated into the undergraduate community. They complete undergraduate degrees at a rate equivalent to the rest of the student population and go on to have very successful careers, both in and outside of sports. 3) Stanford student-athletes are superb role models for youths. High performance is expected of Stanford student-athletes in both academics and athletics, and they must demonstrate a commitment to multifaceted excellence. Their example shows younger student-athletes that high-profile athletic success can be attained while also making a similarly robust commitment to academic endeavors. 4) A place as a Stanford student-athlete is special and highly sought after, and can be earned by anyone through hard work and a desire to excel. Young student-athletes dream of competing for Stanford. Individuals from a variety of backgrounds turn these dreams into reality by making a true commitment to high achievement in school and sports. The experiences of making these commitments as a Stanford student-athlete results in an uncommon bond of mutual respect and admiration among our community and continues throughout life. Being part of that group is a privilege and a point of pride for everyone that is a part of it. 5) Stanford Athletics is an active participant in the Silicon Valley ecosystem and is a center of innovation in sports. Similar to how other parts of Stanford University make pioneering contributions in many fields, Stanford Athletics is at the forefront of progress Social Media In College Athletics


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