Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

A Stand Alone Instructional Resource on Academic Integrity Created for CEP 811 By Jennifer Gross-Russell Click here to move on.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "A Stand Alone Instructional Resource on Academic Integrity Created for CEP 811 By Jennifer Gross-Russell Click here to move on."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 A Stand Alone Instructional Resource on Academic Integrity Created for CEP 811 By Jennifer Gross-Russell Click here to move on

3 Part 1: Instructional Materials Part 2: Student Performances Defining Plagiarism with Video Case Studies Types of Plagiarism Paper Mills DocumentationPlagiarism Quiz Demonstrating Academic Integrity How to Correctly Cite Material Referencing Styles Click here to move on

4  Plagiarism is representing someone else's ideas, writing or other intellectual property as your own, and is another form of academic dishonesty. Any use of the work of others, whether published, unpublished or posted electronically (e.g., on web sites), attributed or anonymous, must include proper acknowledgement. Click here to move on  In the video “Allergy to Originality” by Drew Christie, The New York Times address the social conflict that plagiarism presents. Click here to view this animated Op-Doc.Click here to view this animated Op-Doc.

5  Downloading or buying research papers (Downloading a free paper from a web site or paying to download a paper and submitting it as your own work)  Copying and Pasting (copying and pasting portions of text from online journal articles or websites without proper citation)  Copying or submitting someone else′s work (copying a paper/lab report/formula/design/compu ter code/music/choreography/ass ignment etc. and submitting it as your own work) Click here to move on

6  Strengthens your work/writing  Citing a source through paraphrasing or quoting demonstrates that you have researched and incorporated your findings into your own argument. You also demonstrate that you are aware of other academic opinions on the topic.  Documenting Sources Shows Respect for Intellectual Property  Citing shows respect for the creators of ideas and arguments honoring thinkers and their intellectual property.  Citing is a service to the Reader  Citing enables the reader to locate the sources of information and pursue further reading or investigation on the topic.  Serious Consequences if you do not Document your Sources  Any violation of academic honesty can result in serious consequences, ranging from a written disciplinary warning to expulsion from the university, depending on the extent and nature of the offence. Click here to move on

7 If you directly use someone else′ s words, etc., use quotation marks and give a complete reference. Give a complete reference if you use someone else's: Idea, theory or opinion Music, drawings, designs, dance, photography and other artistic or technical work Tables, graphs or any other graphic element Facts and information that are not generally known Unusual or distinctive phrases, specialized terms, computer codes, quantitative data Spoken or written words When citing, there are two basic rules Click here to move on

8  Sources that Do Not Have to be Referenced Your own ideas do not have to be referenced. Anything that you conclude from your research or that you think up on your own counts as your own idea. ◦ The exception to this is work that you have previously submitted in any course in the past. This must be referenced like any other source.  If your idea is similar to another author's, make it clear in your writing that you thought of this idea on your own, but you later discovered it in another source (example: "Similar conclusions are found in.")  Common knowledge does not have to be referenced. If the information meets the following criteria, it can usually be considered common knowledge: ◦ It appears in several sources without reference. ◦ It is not controversial. This means the information is generally considered as fact. (i.e. The earth orbits around the Sun)  If it is part of your thesis or main arguments, or it is the basis of your research, it must be referenced. If you have any doubts as to whether the information constitutes common knowledge, cite the source or consult your professor. Click here to move on

9  Incorporating another person's ideas and words into your work: Direct Quotation: When incorporating another person's exact words into your work use a direct quotation. Be sure to place an opening quotation (“) when beginning the quote and a closing quotation (”) when ending the quote. Paraphrasing or Summarizing: A paraphrase or summary uses your own words and sentence structure to explain someone else's idea or information obtained from another source (see example). You do not need to use quotation marks, however, you must acknowledge the originating source in your work with a citation. Failing to acknowledge a paraphrase implies that the writing represents your own original idea. Click here to move on

10  There are 2 elements needed to correctly document a source: 1. In your text: Whenever you quote, paraphrase, summarize, or otherwise refer to the work of another, you are required to cite its source, either by way of parenthetical documentation (bibliographic information within parentheses) or by means of a footnote/endnote (bibliographic information at the bottom of the page or at the end of the paper). Example MLA style: Human beings have been described as "symbol-using animals" (Burke 3). **Note you can place the author′s name in the citation (as above) or directly in the text. This is called a signal phrase (see below). Burke explains that human beings have been described as "symbol-using animals" (3). Long quotations: Each reference style will have specific directions for direct quotations that are more than 3 or 4 lines. For example, for APA and MLA styles the following rules apply : In most cases, use a colon to introduce the quotation.  Indent the quotation one inch from the left margin.  Double-space the quotation.  Do not use quotation marks.  Place the parenthetical citation (author and page number) after the period (or other mark of punctuation) that closes the block quotation.  Watch how to properly cite long quotations here.here. Click here to move on

11  2. In your Bibliography/Works Cited/Reference List: Most style manuals require you to assemble a list of the works that you have cited in your paper. This list, included at the end of your paper, may be termed “Works Cited”, a “Reference List”, a “Bibliography”, or some similar term. Example APA style: Fleming T. (1997). Liberty!: The American revolution. New York: Viking. Important elements in your Bibliography/Works Cited/Reference List There are essential pieces of information that a writer must provide about the articles, texts and other sources they have drawn on. Some or all of them are necessary to uniquely identify and locate the original source, or to find similar materials. Author, editor, Group/Association (name and initials) Title of the work (where applicable) Title of the book or journal where the work came from Volume number (of a journal or series of books) Publisher Place of publication Date of publication Web page address (URL or DOI) Click here to move on

12  In your own academic work, you will need to find out what format you are expected to use for your references - this is usually stated with the description of your assignments. Below are some examples of reference styles:  American Sociological Association Format  APA Writing Guide Publication manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th Edition  Chicago Referencing Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Edition (2003)  MLA Format MLA handbook for writers of research papers (2003)  Oxford Style  Vancouver Style  Pay attention to the details of the format: there can be very specific requirements about the order of the information, or for particular kinds of information to be written in fonts such as bold or italic, or for a specific sequence of punctuation marks to separate the different kinds of information. Accuracy is important as it is very frustrating to be unable to find something because the reference was incorrect or incomplete. Click here to move on

13  Use of a direct quotation to indicate that the words quoted were taken from another source.  Use of a paraphrase that is clearly acknowledged. A paraphrase uses your own words to explain someone else's idea or information obtained from another source. (It is often preferable to paraphrase rather than quote directly in order to emphasize the points that are particularly relevant for your argument.)  Use of citations within the text to accompany each and every use of another source, whether directly quoted or paraphrased, including sources from the Internet. Every citation matches a full reference in the Bibliography or Works Cited page included with your paper, allowing your readers to easily find the original source.  Copying (quoting in whole or in part without citing a reference). Anything that includes most of the words or phrases in a passage can be considered copying, even if some of the original words are omitted or changed.  Paraphrasing without acknowledgement. Failing to acknowledge a paraphrase implies that the writing represents your own original idea.  Using an idea or information without acknowledgement. Be careful of situations where you use another person's idea without directly quoting or paraphrasing a specific passage of their writing. It is still necessary to acknowledge that idea, or it will appear that you are misrepresenting it as your own.  Making up references to non-existent articles– this is a violation of academic integrity for which you may be charged and, if found guilty, heavily penalized. Click here to read Case Study #1

14 Does this writing sample display academic integrity? Click on your answer. Yes or No?  The Original Material: During the 1990s, Canada began a major transformation from a predominantly young to a predominantly middle-aged society. For that reason, retailing in Canada entered a new era of quality and service. In the years to come, stores that compete on the basis of quality and service will have a much better chance of success than stores that compete solely on the basis of price. Source: Foot, David K., with Daniel Stoffman. Boom, Bust & Echo 2000: Profiting from the Demographic Shift in the New Millennium. Toronto: MacFarlane Walter & Ross,  Writing Sample 1: Over the past decade, Canada has started to change dramatically from a mainly young society to one that's middle-aged. As a result, Canadian retail has entered a new age of quality and service. In the years to come, stores that compete on the basis of quality and service will fare better than those based on lower prices. Does this writing sample display academic integrity?

15  This example is a poor attempt at using Professor Foot’s original passage without acknowledgement. In it, several words and phrases are substituted by others—however, much of the original phrasing and organization remains the same, as shown below. As it stands, the text appears to represent the writer's ideas rather than those of Professor Foot's and therefore is plagiarism.  Substitutions are shown in {red text with curly brackets}. Original phrases are shown in [blue text with square brackets]. Note that there is no citation at the end.  {Over the past decade}, Canada {has started to change dramatically} [from a] {mainly} young society to one that's middle-aged. {As a result,} Canadian retail has [entered a new] {age} [of quality and service. In the years to come, stores that compete on the basis of quality and service will] {fare better than} those based on lower prices (no citation!).  Continue to next Case Study Continue to next Case Study

16 Does this writing sample display academic integrity? Click on your answer. Yes or No?  The Original Material:  Most of [Wilder's] characters are obsessive personalities. Indeed, some are pushed to the edge of caricature, and a few are almost gargoylelike in their grotesqueness. For example, Sunset Boulevard centers on a former silent movie queen (Gloria Swanson) whose career was destroyed by the advent of sound. She is so steeped in vanity and self-delusion that she scarcely deigns to acknowledge the world Since Then—the talkie revolution. When the protagonist (William Holden) stumbles accidentally into her private world, he suddenly realizes who she is. "You're Norma Desmond. You used to be big," he grudgingly admits. "I am big," she hisses, "it's the pictures that got small." Though such characters are individualized to an indelible degree, they can also be viewed as personifications of such vices as pride, hypocrisy, and lust.  Source: Giannetti, Louis. Masters of the American Cinema. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc.,  Note that some of the information in this passage can be taken as "common knowledge". For example, that Gloria Swanson played the character of Norma Desmond in the movie Sunset Boulevard, directed by Billy Wilder, is common knowledge. Simply viewing the movie will tell you this fact, so it would not be necessary to cite Giannetti if that were the only information you were using.  However, the passage also includes Giannetti's interpretation of the character of Norma Desmond, which he uses as a specific illustration of his theory about characterization in Wilder's movies. If you incorporate any ideas that belong to Giannetti, you must cite the specific source.  Writing Sample #2  Louis Giannetti (1981) suggests that many of Billy Wilder's characters represent personification of such vices as pride, hypocrisy, and lust. Norma Desmond, the reclusive former silent movie queen of Sunset Boulevard, is so steeped in vanity and self-delusion that she is "almost gargoylelike in [her] grotesqueness" (324). Nevertheless (as Giannetti briefly suggests), she remains a strongly individualized character. This can be seen in her vulnerability and developing attachment to the protagonist. She is not merely a caricature but a victim of her own vices, and we feel pity for her reclusive situation and fragile mental state. .

17  Ideas that are taken from the original passage are clearly noted with in-text citations in parentheses as well as with the signal phrases "Louis Giannetti suggests…" and "as Giannetti briefly suggests". A direct quotation and specific page reference is used for the unusual phrase "almost gargoylelike in [her] grotesqueness". ("Her" is in square brackets here because the writer changed this one word to suit her purpose.) A full reference will appear in the bibliography to allow the reader to locate the original source.  Louis Giannetti (1981) suggests that many of Billy Wilder's characters represent personification of such vices as pride, hypocrisy, and lust. Norma Desmond, the reclusive former silent movie queen of Sunset Boulevard, is so steeped in vanity and self-delusion that she is "almost gargoylelike in [her] grotesqueness" (324). Nevertheless (as Giannetti briefly suggests), she remains a strongly individualized character. {This can be seen in her vulnerability and developing attachment to the protagonist. She is not merely a caricature but a victim of her own vices, and we feel pity for her reclusive situation and fragile mental state.}  Furthermore, the writer has not only used Giannetti's ideas, but has extended them with her own interpretation by building on Giannetti's brief reference to character individualization. The student's own interpretation is shown here in {purple text with curly brackets}.  Some students are anxious about using too many sources: "but then everything would be in quotations!" Good students do not merely cite and acknowledge ideas from other sources, but work to develop the skills of analyzing and integrating these ideas into their own argument or interpretation. Here's a good, simple strategy: whenever you use a source, add your own comments about how and why this passage relates to your essay question. This way, you will always show your own thinking, not merely repeat others. Click here to read Case Study #2

18 Does this writing sample display academic integrity? Click on your answer. Yes or No  The Original Material:  Canada  The proportion of "traditional" families continues to decline  Same-sex common-law couples: Male couples outnumber female couples  Common-law relationships in Quebec: Proportion reaches similar level as in Sweden  Canadian household size declining and living alone on the rise  More seniors living with a spouse, more living alone and fewer living in health care institutions  More children living with common-law parents  More young adults living with their parents  Source: Canada. Statistics Canada. "Profile of Canadian families and households: Diversification continues." 2001 Census Analysis Series. 22 October Accessed 22 October  Canadian families are becoming more diverse and the number of "traditional" families is decreasing. Households today are smaller and those in them are increasingly people living by themselves, seniors living with their partners, children living with common-law couples, and parents living with young adults.

19  This passage contains both direct borrowings and information lifted from the original source. Although the information appears to be "factual" (not, for instance, an opinion or theory), it cannot be taken as "common knowledge" because it represents findings of specific research, namely the Canadian Census. Claims such as "the proportion of 'traditional' families continues to decline" must be supported by a specific source.  Although the second sentence compresses the Census findings from the Statistics Canada report, it appears as if the information is the writer's own material. Click here to move on

20  Now that we have had an in-depth look at plagiarism and how to properly site ideas and information you use, you will now take a look a paper mills and how they can have negative consequences on maintaining ones academic integrity.  Please read the following article “Term Paper Mills, Anti-Plagarism Tools and Academic Integrity” by Marie Groark, Diana Oblinger and Miranda Choa.“Term Paper Mills, Anti-Plagarism Tools and Academic Integrity”  Click here when you have completed reading the article Click here when you have completed reading the article

21 Now that you are more familiar with the concept of academic integrity and the concept of plagiarism, you are ready to take the quiz! Click here to begin the plagiarism quiz.Click here to begin the plagiarism quiz.  Discussed the concept of 'academic integrity‘.  Discussed what is acceptable use of another's ideas/words and what is plagiarism.  Identified several reasons why it is important to document or reference sources of information and ideas.  Recognized ways to incorporate another person's ideas/words into your own work.  Identified the requirements for a complete reference to a source of information and be familiar with referencing styles.

22  Berg, Steven L. "Academic Integrity Tutorial." The Academic Integrity Tutorial. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Dec  Christie, Drew. "Allergy to Originality." NYTimes.com. N.p., 31 July Web. 11 Dec  Dkitlibrary123. "Long Direct Quotation." YouTube. YouTube, 18 May Web. 11 Dec  Home Comic The Whole Internet Truth The Whole Internet Truth...


Download ppt "A Stand Alone Instructional Resource on Academic Integrity Created for CEP 811 By Jennifer Gross-Russell Click here to move on."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google