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Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 1 March 2006 Overall Report For Macquarie University.

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Presentation on theme: "Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 1 March 2006 Overall Report For Macquarie University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 1 March 2006 Overall Report For Macquarie University Part 1 – High-Level Results

2 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 2 Table of Contents Section Executive Summary Guidelines For Interpreting Results Demographics Your Results High-Level Weather Map Risk Analysis Summarised Open-Ended Responses See Part 2 for detailed breakdown of results and full listing of open-ended responses sorted by Division/Office/Area Slide

3 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 3 Executive Summary

4 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 4 Executive Summary Macquarie University should be congratulated for undertaking the “Your Say” staff survey at a time when the higher education sector is already under the microscope from AUQA and the Federal Government Higher Education Workplace Reforms. While clearly employee surveying fits easily within quality management (surveying establishes processes for employee involvement and feedback, enables assessment of the quality of management practices and employee satisfaction, and provides a tool for the measurement of continuous improvement), and while employee surveying is common practice within similarly sized private-sector organisations, Macquarie is among only a small group of universities who are leading the way within the higher education sector by undertaking organisation-wide employee surveying of a broad range of human resource management practices. By several measures, the implementation to-date of the “Your Say” survey should be considered a success: –A strong response rate of 74% was achieved, –The above response rate was achieved without having to use any extended time with the survey open to obtain further responses, –Three-quarters of staff took time to provide detailed text responses.

5 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 5 The 2006 “Your Say” staff survey was based on a core set of questions drawn from the standard Voice Climate Survey and a number of tailored questions specific to Macquarie University. The survey comprised a total of: –126 agree/disagree questions, –2 open-ended questions, and –13 demographic questions. The survey was conducted primarily using an online survey, although a small number of paper surveys were also completed. The survey was “live” for a period of approximately 3 weeks. The survey was officially launched at the Vice Chancellor’s “town hall” meeting on March 8 th and closed on April 3 rd usable surveys were returned from an estimated 1896 continuing and fixed term staff, for a 74% response rate. The margin of error for the overall sample is approximately ±1.2%. The average time to complete the survey was minutes. Executive Summary

6 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 6 Executive Summary There are several strengths of Macquarie University identified by the survey:  Overall staff show a healthy level of employee engagement (73% Fav, 75%ile Rank, 70% Fav Uni Bench). Staff like the kind of work they do (85% Fav, 80%ile Rank, 84% Fav Uni Bench). Staff are proud to tell people they work for Macquarie University (80% Fav, 68%ile Rank, 77% Fav Uni Bench). Staff show a strong overall intention to stay at Macquarie University (65% Fav, 76%ile Rank, 63% Fav Uni Bench).  Staff understand their goals and objectives and what is required of them in their jobs (82% Fav, 56%ile Rank, 80% Fav Uni Bench), and also understand how their jobs contribute to the overall success of Macquarie University (86% Fav, 59%ile Rank). Staff believe they have enough autonomy in their day-to-day work (85% Fav).  Staff believe they have good working relationships with their co-workers (87% Fav, 47%ile Rank, 88% Fav Uni Bench), and believe their co- workers give them help and support (80% Fav, 46%ile Rank, 83% Fav Uni Bench).

7 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 7 Executive Summary Strengths of Macquarie University (cont’d):  Staff believe sexual harassment is prevented and discouraged (86% Fav, 44%ile Rank, 85% Fav Uni Bench).  Staff believe in the work done by Macquarie University (82% Fav, 67%ile Rank).  In comparison to other universities, Macquarie University scored noticeably higher in the areas of:  Support for teaching evaluation (67% Fav, 56% Fav Uni Bench), encouragement of teaching evaluation (79% Fav, 73% Fav Uni Bench) and support for achieving teaching goals (57% Fav, 49% Fav Uni Bench),  Frequency of performance evaluation (60% Fav, 50% Fav Uni Bench),  Satisfaction with benefits (77% Fav, 68% Fav Uni Bench),  Research being high quality (69% Fav, 60% Fav Uni Bench),  Training and development of staff (60% Fav, 52% Fav Uni Bench).

8 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 8 Executive Summary The open-ended text responses demonstrated significant numbers of staff identifying strengths in the areas of :  The campus environment is pleasant and welcoming (27% of respondents commenting).  Provision of support and flexible study options to maximise the student experience (17%).  Highly qualified and talented staff, both academic and general (16%).  High quality research that is well supported by the University (15%).  A willingness to embrace change and try new ways of doing things (15%).  A great location within easy reach of many facilities (15%).  A high level of teamwork and a collegial atmosphere (10%).

9 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 9 Executive Summary Possible areas for improvement include:  Many staff believe communication across all sections of Macquarie University could be improved (14% Fav, 10%ile Rank, 19% Fav Uni Bench). Many staff also believe knowledge and information are not always shared throughout Macquarie University (19% Fav, 10%ile Rank, 23% Fav Uni Bench). Some staff feel there is little cooperation between different sections in Macquarie University (23% Fav, 11%ile Rank, 29% Fav Uni Bench.  Some staff believe they have little input into everyday decision-making in Macquarie University (32% Fav, 32%ile Rank, 41% Fav Uni Bench), and believe they are not always encouraged to give feedback about things that concern them (44% Fav, 21%ile Rank, 61% Fav Uni Bench). Some staff feel they are not consulted before decisions that affect them are made (29% Fav, 22%ile Rank, 41% Fav Uni Bench).  Only a minority of staff understand the overall strategy (33% Fav, 13%ile Rank, 43% Fav Uni Bench) and vision (40% Fav, 16%ile Rank, 48% Fav Uni Bench) senior management have for the university.

10 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 10 Executive Summary Possible areas for improvement (cont’d):  Many staff feel change in Macquarie University could be handled better (22% Fav, 12%ile Rank, 28% Fav Uni Bench). Many staff also feel the way Macquarie University is run has not improved over the last year (26% Fav, 11%ile Rank, 49% Fav Uni Bench). Less then half of all survey respondents believe Macquarie University is innovative (45% Fav, 29%ile Rank, 49% Fav Uni Bench). Only a small minority of respondents believe Macquarie University learns from its mistakes and successes (25% Fav, 11%ile Rank, 34% Fav Uni Bench).  Some staff have little confidence in the ability of senior management (43% Fav, 16%ile Rank, 48% Fav Uni Bench), and do not believe senior management are good role models for staff (33% Fav, 13%ile Rank, 39% Fav Uni Bench). Many staff feel senior management do not keep people informed about what’s going on (34% Fav, 19%ile Rank, 41% Fav Uni Bench), and also feel senior management do not listen to other staff (26% Fav, 11%ile Rank, 32% Fav Uni Bench).

11 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 11 Executive Summary Possible areas for improvement (cont’d):  Some staff believe there are few clear policies and procedures for how work is to be done (42% Fav, 11%ile Rank, 48% Fav Uni Bench), and believe it is unclear who has responsibility for different tasks (29% Fav, 6%ile Rank, 34% Fav Uni Bench). Many staff feel the policies and procedures are inefficient and poorly designed (22% Fav, 6%ile Rank, 33% Fav Uni Bench).  Some staff believe Macquarie University could do better at selecting the right people for the right jobs (30% Fav, 21%ile Rank, 34% Fav Uni Bench). Some staff feel managers in Macquarie University are not clear about the type of people the University needs to employ (34% Fav, 10%ile Rank, 40% Fav Uni Bench).  Many staff believe there is insufficient time and effort spent on career planning (23% Fav, 27%ile Rank, 20% Fav Uni Bench). Some staff feel they are not given opportunities to develop skills needed for career progression (46% Fav, 44%ile Rank, 41% Fav Uni Bench), nor do they believe there are enough opportunities for their careers to progress in Macquarie University (37% Fav, 38%ile Rank).

12 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 12 Executive Summary The open-ended text responses demonstrated significant numbers of staff identifying the following areas for improvement:  Many staff believe state of facilities, such as buildings and parking on the campus could be improved (22% of respondents commenting).  Better cross-department communication (19%).  A more supportive and communicative senior management team (15%).  More efficient and clear processes and procedures (15%).  Better responsiveness to the needs of all students (11%).

13 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 13 Executive Summary This report uses statistically derived measures of importance to determine possible priorities for intervention. When examining the University’s performance on issues that appeared to be important, the biggest gaps (and hence possibly the highest priorities) appear to be: –Improving top-down and bottom-up communication, and ensuring senior management remain visible and approachable, –Improving recruitment processes and practices in order to employ the right people for the right jobs, –Ensuring policies and procedures are understood and well-designed, –Ensuring knowledge and information are shared across of the University, –Strengthening a performance focus and encouraging the achievement of positive results throughout the University, –Encouraging entrepreneurship, –Encouraging staff to provide feedback about things that concern them, –Increasing the availability of career opportunities for staff, and devoting sufficient time to planning for these opportunities, –Improving the quality and amount of technology available, and ensuring staff are aware of how to use it.

14 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 14 Executive Summary Differences in results across different units and demographic categories include: –There were no areas that were clearly more satisfied than the average, but the areas showing the most consistently positive responses were (in descending order) the Australian Centre for Educational Studies, Macquarie International, Div of Linguistics and Psychology, Vice Chancellor’s Office, Buildings and Grounds Office, Div of Society, Culture, Media and Philosophy, and the Div of Information and Communication Sciences. –Staff from Information Technology Services are clearly the most dissatisfied overall. –Executives and Heads of Divisions and Offices and HEW 1-3 staff gave the most consistently positive responses. No classification was noticeably less satisfied than most others. –Part-time staff are more satisfied than full-time staff. Staff employed on a fixed-term basis are slightly more satisfied than staff employed on a continuing basis.

15 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 15 Executive Summary Differences in results across different units and demographic categories include (cont’d): –Staff of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent are more satisfied than other staff. –No substantial differences were found in satisfaction levels between the majority of staff and those staff who have a disability, have a non-English speaking background, have dependent children, or who have caring responsibilities. –No substantial differences were found between males and females. –Staff 60 and above are more satisfied overall, whilst staff under 30 reported the lowest levels of employee engagement, and staff in the age group reported the lowest overall satisfaction levels with a broad range of management practices. –Staff with less than 2 years service appear more satisfied than other staff.

16 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 16 Executive Summary These critical steps must now be undertaken regarding the implementation of this employee survey: –Results need to be circulated and explained to the upper and middle management levels within Macquarie University, combined with a discussion of meaning, implications and likely next steps in the use of the results. –High level results of this survey need to be communicated to staff, along with a brief explanation of the actions and next steps that will be taken in response to the survey. –More detailed action planning must be scheduled, either as an independent initiative associated with the survey or embedded within existing ongoing organisational planning.

17 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 17 Guidelines For Interpretation Of Results

18 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 18 Main employees from Macquarie University who worked on the project were: –Tim Sprague, Director Human Resources –Wayne Bleakley, Manager Policy & Communications –Gaby Laudams, Manager Consulting Services The members of Voice Project who worked on the project were: –Sarah Locke, Consultant –Louise Metcalf, Principal Consultant –Dr Peter Langford, Director Credits

19 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 19 This report on the Macquarie University Voice Climate Survey: –Assesses multiple indicators of Macquarie University’s performance across a broad range of HR and general management practices –Estimates the relative importance of these practices for maximising (1) employee engagement and (2) bottom line results –Benchmarks the performance of various organisational units within Macquarie University –Benchmarks performance against other universities in our database –Benchmarks performance against our normative database compiled from several hundred organisations from a wide range of professions and industries broadly representing the Australian economy The Voice Climate Survey, benchmarking data and the design of this report have been developed through an ongoing research program called Voice Project at Macquarie University (for more information visit or Copyright warning: Copyright for the survey, items and benchmark data shown in this report belong to Voice Project Pty Ltd and Access Macquarie Ltd. The survey, items and benchmark data cannot be reused or distributed to others without the written permission of the Director of Voice Project. Background of Survey

20 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 20 This report contains various levels of information. When compiling such a report there is always a trade-off between providing lots of information versus keeping the report simple and user-friendly. We manage this trade-off by providing the detail towards the end of the report, and highlights of the results towards the front of the report The highlights of results include the following: A performance overview using “traffic lights” that shows at a glance the areas of excellent, good and poor performance Graphs such as the one shown to the right are used to show how various organisational units or levels performed in comparison to other units or levels Performance – How To Interpret

21 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 21 This report presents information about both performance and importance for the items and scales within the Voice climate survey At the most basic level of reporting for scale and items scores is the commonly used “agreement index” (represented by “% Fav”) that shows the percentage of people who responded favourably (i.e., with either an “Agree” or “Strongly Agree”) to the survey items. “Traffic lights” are used to indicate whether the percentage is “Poor”, “Good” or “Excellent” based on commonly used, but nevertheless arbitrary, cut-offs of “ = 80%” Fav responses At the next level, the distribution of responses for each item and scale is shown (i.e., what proportion of respondents gave “Strongly Disagree”, “Disagree”, “Mixed”, “Agree” or “Strongly Agree”) Performance – How To Interpret SDDMASA Agree Disagree/ Mixed Good <=80% Fav <=80% Fav 50-80% Fav <50% Fav Legend Excellent Poor

22 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 22 For each item and scale, the percentage of respondents who did not give an answer, or who answered “Not applicable” is shown in the column labelled “%N/A”. Analyses on all items and scales did not include these responses For each item and scale, a “mean” is also shown. The mean is the average score on the 1-to-5 scale where 1 = “Strongly Disagree” and 5 = “Strongly Agree” The % Fav statistics are shown using the same “traffic lights” described on the previous page Where external benchmark data are available, the percentile rank (represented by “%ile Rank”) of your organisation is shown. The percentile rank shows the percentage of organisations in our benchmark database whose performance you exceed – so, a score of 91% means you scored better than 91% of organisations in our database (nb. the percentile rank is based on the Mean scores) The %ile rank is colour-coded using traffic lights, with red representing the bottom quartile, yellow the mid-50%, and green the top quartile Performance – How To Interpret

23 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 23 The report also estimates the importance of each of the scales and items for driving (1) employee engagement and (2) bottom line results. Importance is estimated using correlations (denoted statistically with an “r”). The report shows importance using blue bar graphs – the longer and darker a bar, the more likely it is that that management practice is an important driver of either employee engagement or bottom line results (eg, if leadership and employee engagement were highly correlated, improving leadership may improve employee engagement). It is important to note, however, that correlation does not prove causality. Importance estimates are only shown for groups with 30 or more respondents because the statistics behind these estimates are more robust when larger numbers of responses are included. Sometimes no bar is shown because it’s not appropriate to calculate a correlation between two variables when one of the variables is either the same as the other variable or was calculated from the other variable (e.g., job satisfaction is used to calculate employee engagement so no correlation is shown between these scales). Importance – How To Interpret High Correlation (r >.50) Medium Correlation (.40 < r <.50) Low Correlation (r <.40)

24 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 24 The outcome variables used to estimate importance are: –Employee Engagement Index –Bottom Line Results Index The Employee Engagement Index is the average of the three scales: –Job Satisfaction –Organisational Commitment –Intention To Stay The Bottom Line Results Index is the average of the three scales: –Change & Innovation –Customer Satisfaction –Organisation Performance Importance – How To Interpret Employee Engagement Index Organisational Commitment Organisational Commitment Intention To Stay Intention To Stay Job Satisfaction Job Satisfaction Bottom Line Results Index Organisation Performance Organisation Performance Change & Innovation Change & Innovation Customer Satisfaction Customer Satisfaction

25 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 25 Importance – How To Interpret Regression analyses are also used as another method of estimating the key drivers of organisational outcomes. Regression analyses search for the combination of scales that can best predict employee engagement and bottom line results The arrow to the left of the diagram shows the relative importance of the scales Rewards & Recognition Rewards & Recognition Learning & Development Learning & Development Performance Management Performance Management Work/Life Balance Work/Life Balance Change & Innovation Change & Innovation Good >=80% Fav >=80% Fav 50-80% Fav <50% Fav Legend Excellent Poor = Hypothetical Example Increasing Importance

26 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 26 Gap Analysis – How To Interpret The gap analysis compares performance on management practices with estimated importance of those practices, highlighting areas where performance is high on important practices, as well as areas where performance is low on important practices. The gap analysis shows relative performance and importance. The graph shows "higher" and "lower" performance – not "high" and "low" performance. As such, gap analyses do not enable comparison of one organisation or organisational unit against another. The vertical axis on the gap analysis shows the “Performance" of an organisation across all the survey issues. "Performance" is determined by how favourable staff rated the organisation. The horizontal axis shows the “Importance" of the issues for the specific organisation. "Importance" is assessed by calculating the correlation of scores on the survey issues with a weighted average of outcome measures included in the survey. The cross-hairs on the gap analysis indicate the means for performance and importance.

27 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 27 Weather Map – How To Interpret Demographics collected in the survey are shown across the top of the columns. Scales are shown along the left hand side Number of people responding in each demographic is shown below the column titles The % Fav statistics are shown using the same “traffic lights” described on previous pages that is, where the percentage is valued at “Poor”, “Good” or “Excellent” and colour coded accordingly Vertical stripes of a given colour, that are largely uninterrupted, indicate opinions based on the demographic to which the staff member belongs Horizontal stripes of a given colour, that are largely uninterrupted, indicate issues that are most likely to be organisation wide

28 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 28 When reporting the scores for the scales and items, we also extract the following subsets of items/questions to highlight some key results: –Top 10 and Bottom 10 Items on % Fav (i.e., the items on which people had the most positive and negative views) –Top and Bottom 10 Items Compared to Uni % Fav Bench (i.e., the items on which you performed best and worst in comparison to other universities in our database) –Top 10 and Bottom 10 Items on All Industry %ile Rank (i.e., the items on which you performed best and worst in comparison to other organisations in our benchmarking/normative database) –Top 10 Gaps for Performance vs Importance (i.e., the areas where performance was rated low in comparison to the relative importance of the issue) –Top 10 Items Impacting Engagement (i.e., those items correlating most highly with the Employee Engagement Index) –Top 10 Items Impacting Results (i.e., those items correlating most highly with the Bottom Line Results Index) Top 10 & Bottom 10 Items

29 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 29 Demographics

30 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 30 Demographics Groups with less than 10 responses are not separately analysed elsewhere in this report

31 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 31 Demographics

32 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 32 Demographics

33 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 33 Your Results

34 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 34 Employee Engagement Index Intention To Stay Intention To Stay Organisation Commitment Organisation Commitment Job Satisfaction Job Satisfaction Performance Overview Talent Motivation & Initiative Motivation & Initiative Organisational Direction Organisational Direction Leadership Ethics Organisational Purpose Organisational Purpose Results Focus Rewards & Recognition Rewards & Recognition Role Clarity Performance Appraisal Performance Appraisal Resources Processes Technology Facilities Diversity Safety Communication & Cooperation Communication & Cooperation Recruitment & Selection Recruitment & Selection Career Opportunities Career Opportunities Supervision Learning & Development Learning & Development Participation & Involvement Participation & Involvement Bottom Line Results Index Organisation Performance Organisation Performance Customer Satisfaction Customer Satisfaction Change & Innovation Change & Innovation Employee Engagement Index Intention To Stay Intention To Stay Organisational Commitment Organisational Commitment Job Satisfaction Job Satisfaction Entrepreneurship Teaching Workload Research Community Engagement Community Engagement Teamwork Work/Life Balance Work/Life Balance Wellness

35 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 35 Gap Analysis HigherLower Higher Promote Maintain Prioritise Limit Ideally, management practices should rest in the oval where there is a good match between performance and importance

36 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 36 Predicting Engagement A regression analysis was conducted to produce the formula to the right showing the combination of scales that best predicted employee engagement The colours in the circles to the right show how you performed on the scales and the overall index The arrow to the left of the diagram shows the relative importance of the scales The results from this regression analysis should be interpreted in combination with the importance ratings shown elsewhere in this report that are based on correlational analyses Organisational Purpose Organisational Purpose Role Clarity Career Opportunities Career Opportunities = nb. Calculation based on linear regression using stepwise method with.01 entry and.05 removal requirements with missing values being replaced with mean. Model development continued until change in R- square is less than 1%. Not including the following scales as independent variables: Job Satisfaction, Organisation Commitment, Intention To Stay. Increasing Importance Teamwork Organisation Performance Organisation Performance +

37 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 37 Predicting Results A regression analysis was conducted to produce the formula to the right showing the combination of scales that best predicted bottom line results The colours in the circles to the right show how you performed on the scales and the overall index The arrow to the left of the diagram shows the relative importance of the scales The results from this regression analysis should be interpreted in combination with the importance ratings shown elsewhere in this report that are based on correlational analyses Technology Wellness Recruitment & Selection Recruitment & Selection Processes = Increasing Importance nb. Calculation based on linear regression using stepwise method with.01 entry and.05 removal requirements with missing values being replaced with mean. Model development continued until change in R- square is less than 1%. Not including the following scales as independent variables: Customer Satisfaction, Change & Innovation, Organisation Performance. Organisational Commitment Organisational Commitment Leadership + +

38 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 38 Performance Importance Performance Overview

39 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 39 Performance Importance Top 10 Items on % Fav

40 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 40 Performance Importance Top 10 Items Compared to Uni % Fav Bench

41 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 41 Performance Importance Top 10 Items on All Industry %ile Rank

42 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 42 Performance Importance Bottom 10 Items on % Fav

43 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 43 Performance Importance Bottom 10 Items Compared to Uni % Fav Bench

44 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 44 Performance Importance Bottom 10 Items on All Industry %ile Rank

45 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 45 Performance Importance Top 10 Gaps Performance vs Importance

46 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 46 Performance Importance Top 10 Items Impacting Engagement

47 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 47 Performance Importance Top 10 Items Impacting Results

48 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 48 High Level Weather Map

49 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 49 Weather Map Division/ Office/Area

50 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 50 Weather Map Division/ Office/Area (cont’d)

51 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 51 Weather Map Classification Level

52 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 52 Weather Map Employ. Status First Language Not English Employ. Basis ATSI Descent

53 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 53 Weather Map Person with a Disability Carer of Other than Children Require W’place Adjust. Depend. Children

54 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 54 Weather Map Age Gender Length of Service

55 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 55 Risk Analysis

56 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 56 Risk Analysis Division/ Office/Area

57 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 57 Risk Analysis Division/ Office/Area (cont’d)

58 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 58 Risk Analysis Classification Level

59 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 59 Risk Analysis Employ. Status Employ. Basis ATSI Descent First Language Not English

60 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 60 Risk Analysis Person with a Disability Require W’place Adjust. Depend. Children Carer of other than Children

61 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 61 Gender Risk Analysis Age Length of Service

62 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 62 Summarised Open-Ended Responses

63 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 63 Two open-ended questions were asked: 1.Q127 List the three greatest strengths of Macquarie University 2.Q128 List three ways Macquarie University could be improved The following pages summarise the themes arising from these open-ended questions and provide example responses See Part 2 of the report for a listing of open-ended responses sorted by Division/Office/Area Open-Ended Responses

64 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 64 Q127 List the three greatest strengths of Macquarie University Overall, 72% of respondents answered this question A. Campus Grounds27% B. Customer Satisfaction17% C. Talent16% D. Research15% E. Change and Innovation15% F. Location15% G. Teamwork/Collegiality10% Open-Ended Responses Percentage Of Respondents Commenting On The Issue Most Common Issues Commented On

65 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 65 Open-Ended Responses Q127 List the three greatest strengths of Macquarie University Overall Macquarie UnivCommenting Aust. Centre for Educational Studies Division of Economic andFinancial Studies Division ofEnvironmental and LifeSciences Division of Humanities Division of Information andCommunicationSciences Division of LawDivision of Linguistics andPsychology Division of Society, Culture, Media and Philosophy Macquarie Graduate School of Management BuildingGrounds OfficeCentre forFlexible Learning Responses: Campus Grounds27%24%27%30% 32%39%24%19%28%67%39% Customer Satisfaction17%30%13%27%23%16%32%16%18%17%8%13% Talent16%25%19%22%17%14%18%17%16%21%25%13% Research15%22%8%30%24%28%11%20%26%7%8%3% Change & Innovation15%19%10%15%19%16%13%19%23%7%8%16% Location15%16%21% 11%26%24%7% 34%17%6% Teamwork/Collegiality10%13%17%18%17%10%11%15%12%3%8%16% Diversity9%12%13%5%13%8%11%12%23%7%0%13% Organisation Commitment9%16%4%13%16%5%8% 9%7%8%23% Organisation Performance7%16%11%3%0%8%16%6%4%10%8%10% Teaching7%15%9%14%19%5% 10%9%7%0%3% Work/Life Balance7% 5%11%10%9%0%9%14%7%0% Internationalism6%4%8%5%10%5% 8%7%0% 3% Wellness4% 2%5%9%2%8%6%7% 0%3% Leadership3% 2% 6%0%3%5% 10%8%3% Community Engagement3%9%0%1%10%4%3% 5%3%0%10% Entrepreneurship/Commercialisation3%6%2%3%1%5%3%4% 0% Job Satisfaction3%4%2%5%6%2%3% 7% 8%0% Resources2%1%2%3%0%5% 4% 3%0%3% Motivation2%4%2%3%6%3% 2%3%0%6%

66 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 66 Open-Ended Responses Q127 List the three greatest strengths of Macquarie University (cont’d) Overall Macquarie UnivCommenting Aust. Centre for Educational Studies Division of Economic andFinancial Studies Division ofEnvironmental and LifeSciences Division of Humanities Division of Information andCommunicationSciences Division of LawDivision of Linguistics andPsychology Division of Society, Culture, Media and Philosophy Macquarie Graduate School of Management BuildingGrounds OfficeCentre forFlexible Learning Responses: Campus Grounds27%24%27%30% 32%39%24%19%28%67%39% Customer Satisfaction17%30%13%27%23%16%32%16%18%17%8%13% Talent16%25%19%22%17%14%18%17%16%21%25%13% Research15%22%8%30%24%28%11%20%26%7%8%3% Change & Innovation15%19%10%15%19%16%13%19%23%7%8%16% Location15%16%21% 11%26%24%7% 34%17%6% Teamwork/Collegiality10%13%17%18%17%10%11%15%12%3%8%16% Diversity9%12%13%5%13%8%11%12%23%7%0%13% Organisation Commitment9%16%4%13%16%5%8% 9%7%8%23% Organisation Performance7%16%11%3%0%8%16%6%4%10%8%10% Teaching7%15%9%14%19%5% 10%9%7%0%3% Work/Life Balance7% 5%11%10%9%0%9%14%7%0% Internationalism6%4%8%5%10%5% 8%7%0% 3% Wellness4% 2%5%9%2%8%6%7% 0%3% Leadership3% 2% 6%0%3%5% 10%8%3% Community Engagement3%9%0%1%10%4%3% 5%3%0%10% Entrepreneurship/Commercialisation3%6%2%3%1%5%3%4% 0% Job Satisfaction3%4%2%5%6%2%3% 7% 8%0% Resources2%1%2%3%0%5% 4% 3%0%3% Motivation2%4%2%3%6%3% 2%3%0%6%

67 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 67 Strength A: Campus Grounds (27%) The grounds, open space Pleasant grounds - easily accessible for most Beautiful campus Its campus which is relaxing and revitalising Trees, wildlife, open spaces A green oasis in suburbia Beautiful grounds, enormous natural physical resources Campus environment, spacious, rural-like The surroundings of natural bush land Lots of student facilities The campus is still open, fresh and on a human scale. It is welcoming and energising Attractive campus and own railway station Beautiful external environment Fantastic grounds - where else can you go to work and see wildlife outside your office? Open-Ended Responses

68 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 68 Strength B: Customer Satisfaction (17%) The flexibility of undergraduate study options MU is still a flexible and friendly place for students to study Internal support for outstanding postgraduate and postdoctoral candidates Providing flexibility for students to study a range of different subjects across the University and hence become more well-rounded individuals Care of students Its flexible curriculum The wide range of subject/units provided allowing for real student choice Student focused Commitment to students Diversity in learning Its effort to maintain small group teaching with attention to individual students from diverse backgrounds Financial support of postgraduate students Supportive for students Open-Ended Responses

69 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 69 Strength C: Talent (16%) Its people - staff (both academic and administrative) and their knowledge - they're our future ambassadors There are some very good academics on the staff Intellectual capital = quality people Skills of staff Terrific general and administrative staff Good balance of experienced and new staff Some very gifted personnel with proven achievements Very good reputation of its academic and administrative staff Excellent achievements of a number of staff Good lecturers Strength of its staff Macquarie's got great staff Generally good quality staff My department has many high achieving and dedicated staff Open-Ended Responses

70 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 70 Strength D: Research (15%) Interesting research opportunities A few clumps of excellent researchers Emphasis on research and internal funding support for it Research areas of excellence Research grant support for new staff Research-oriented - provides the corresponding necessary resources to encourage such a culture Emphasis on research Macquarie research has been more daring, more willing to venture outside the trodden path Quality of research Strong commitment to research Internal research grants Fascinating research programs Research profile Open-Ended Responses

71 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 71 Strength E: Change and Innovation (15%) Innovative approach to e-learning Refreshingly innovative nature Devolved financial arrangements make innovations possible Innovation in products Young and innovative staff Only 40 years old, it can take on board new ideas MQ provides an innovative environment to explore new ideas Sits on top the Innovative Universities list - gives it some clout The University appears to look to the future and encompass changing times Willingness to explore potential opportunities Innovation of new methods/ideas A willingness to innovate and change from the top A forthright VC with a positive attitude towards Macquarie Willingness to change Its commitment to innovation and positive improvement Open-Ended Responses

72 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 72 Strength F: Location (15%) Technology precinct Location in Sydney’s north-western suburbs Its physical location Northern suburbs – attracting good citizens Close proximity to education savvy pool of potential students Large, single campus institution Well-located Location (away from the city has its advantages) Location and potential facilities/resources available Geographical position in Sydney’s technology belt Good central location Location to business Location and interaction with the community it is located in Geographic position Close to facilities (Macquarie shopping) Open-Ended Responses

73 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 73 Strength G: Teamwork/Collegiality (10%) Friendly staff - administrative and academic Collegiality among academic staff Collegial work environment The staff are hard working and cooperative I enjoy working with the people in my department The relationship between the co-workers in my department is like a family environment Collegiality among department staff Close community The staff - very friendly and always willing to give 100% to assist other staff and students Good working culture in most units/departments Warm and nice culture Civil and collegial organisational climate I have a great working relationship with my colleagues Open-Ended Responses

74 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 74 Q128 List three ways Macquarie University could be improved Overall, 74% of respondents answered this question A. Facilities22% B. Communication and Cooperation19% C. Leadership15% D. Processes15% E. Customer Satisfaction11% Open-Ended Responses Percentage Of Respondents Commenting On The Issue Most Common Issues Commented On

75 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 75 Open-Ended Responses Q128 List three ways Macquarie University could be improved

76 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 76 Open-Ended Responses Q128 List three ways Macquarie University could be improved (cont’d)

77 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 77 Improvement A: Facilities (22%) Priority parking is a must Improve the physical environment - especially offices and learning spaces Buildings and facilities need to be upgraded Easier access to transport even though that will be resolved, but still a long wait until the railway is completed The entire campus needs to have all areas air conditioned Free staff parking Decide on building/environmental changes and stick to it Teaching and office spaces are swelteringly hot and terribly overcrowded Improve staff conditions especially in relation to basic elements such as staff parking so that we can park and get to our classes without the stress of taking up to 40 minutes to find a car parking space Refurbishment of old buildings More recurrent maintenance and cleaning of established buildings and high use areas Since Commerce building erected in 2005, parking issue is critical Open-Ended Responses

78 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 78 Improvement B: Communication and Cooperation (19%) Better communication between management and the divisions/departments Better communications across and within divisions More access to information Being kept informed about IT policies at Divisional and University levels Communication with teaching staff when new services are planned for them Better information flowing down to divisions Greater transparency between academic/general staff and management Improved cross-sectional communication to understand what people are doing in the IT space Break down some of the silos some divisions have constructed Better relations between Divisional and School heads Better cross-disciplinary interaction More communication and collaboration between departments (to avoid insular communities and to make use of the knowledge that exists on campus) Provision of public forum for opinion interchange Open-Ended Responses

79 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 79 Improvement C: Leadership (15%) More focused senior management team Change of management style Too many levels of management Improve quality of senior management Reduce the level of micro-management by senior officers of the University Remove the us and them approach of management Better information from senior management Radical overhaul of its management structure Lack of support from management Abandoning the patronizing attitude of the senior management towards the staff Less controlling management style Senior management who listen to staff concerns Professionalism in management More transparent and robust management Open-Ended Responses

80 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 80 Improvement D: Processes (15%) Relieve administrative burden on academic staff More administrative support Transparency at all levels, especially for the promotions process Support for democratic processes Streamlined accounting and financial administration A more realistic and strategically driven budget model Simplifying work processes There is far too much administrative paperwork, even for simple processes Administration needs to improve efficiency Inefficient processes create work for everyone Travel policy is too complex Improve Visa processes Timetable defining IP protection process Significantly reduce the amount of paperwork Documented standard working procedures Open-Ended Responses

81 Voice Project Survey Report (c) Voice Project Pty Ltd & Access Macquarie Ltd – Overview Of Results Page 81 Improvement E: Customer Satisfaction (11%) More vibrant campus life and activities for students Improved access to student administration for postgraduate students Respond to the needs of local students - the UAI cutoffs have soared in recent years - make more places available to local students over and above HECS quotas, at an affordable fee which reflects the realistic marginal cost of the place Less focus on extracting money from fee-paying students and pushing them through More HECS places for HSC students Getting rid of restrictive study patterns Value undergraduates more highly More support for overseas students Better social life Maintain good customer services Stronger student focus i.e. more facilities, particularly around orientation Open-Ended Responses


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