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Summary of Results from Spring 2014 Presented: 11/5/14.

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Presentation on theme: "Summary of Results from Spring 2014 Presented: 11/5/14."— Presentation transcript:

1 Summary of Results from Spring 2014 Presented: 11/5/14

2 Context In an effort to gauge the current climate of the district community with regard to our schools and organization a survey was commissioned in Spring of The National Center for School Leadership (www.ncfsl.org) performed the survey.www.ncfsl.org The survey addressed various stakeholder groups: students, parents, faculty and staff. Results were compiled into 4 areas: School Climate, Parent Engagement, Student Engagement, and Teacher Attitudes.

3 Each area was reported out from varying perspectives: School Climate: by ethnicity, by tenure, by position, by location Parent Engagement: by grade level, by school performance, by location, by source Student Engagement: by job status, by extra-curricular status, by location, by grade level Teacher Attitudes: by grades taught by tenure by position

4 Process Overview  Survey Stakeholders  Review the data and follow-up with discussions where the data suggests more clarification is needed  Summarize the priorities  Share the results  Develop a team (district/school leadership) and conduct strategy sessions -delve deeper into the varying perspectives -create focus groups to delve deeper where appropriate  Develop Action Plan(s)  Implement and evaluate the progress

5 Notes for Interpreting Survey Scores Remember, throughout this process it is critical that national trends are eliminated from district data and likewise, district trends are eliminated from building specific data. This enables the organization to focus in on those critical elements that they will be able to most effectively address. Additionally, the protocols we are going to share with you are based on the assumption that each location has a significant sample of at least 30 respondents per category. While breakdowns in the data for groups of less than 30 can be interesting, this data must be considered anecdotal. As you will see, we have numerous categories where sample size does not lend itself to statistical significance.

6 Strengths  Review the top 10 highest rated items for your location. Identify those that are not among the top 10 highest rated items for either the national and/or district sample. These tend to be significant strengths of your organization/location.  Scores of 67% favorable are generally considered strengths.  Scores of 75%+ favorable are generally considered real strengths.  Compare favorable percentages for your location to a district or national average. Five (5%) percent above is a relative strength while ten (10%) above is a very positive strength.

7 Opportunities (areas for growth)  Review the 10 lowest rated items for your location. Identify those that are not among the 10 lowest rated items for either the national and/or district sample. These tend to be significant areas for growth within your organization/location.  Scores of 20%-30% unfavorable are generally considered an area for improvement.  Scores of 30%+ unfavorable are generally considered an area for immediate improvement.  Compare unfavorable percentages for your location to a district or national average. Five (5%) percent below is an opportunity for improvement while ten (10%) percent below is a significant risk that should be explored further.

8 High Neutrals High neutral scores can indicate one of several things. Most notable high neutrals indicate a degree of apathy or ambivalence related to the topic. High neutrals are typically thought to be either an opportunity in that organization that can sway the thinking of a large percent of the population by addressing the topic or a threat if the topic remains unaddressed (and the stakeholder group becomes less satisfied).

9 District Highest Rated: I am committed to seeing my school/district succeed 95% I feel safe at work 87% I know what is expected of me at work 86% Considering everything, I am satisfied working at my school/department 83% I would recommend my school/school district to a family member seeking school for their children 81% I have the freedom I need to do my job 81% I would recommend my school/department to a friend seeking employment 80% Overall, my school/department does a good job of meeting my needs 79% I am able to share my ideas and opinions with school/department leadership 78% I am satisfied with the level of supervision I receive 78% National Highest Rated: I am committed to seeing my school/district succeed 97% I know what is expected of me at work 91% I feel safe at work 87% The people I work with care a great deal about the quality of their work 86% The people that I work with cooperate to get the job done 84% Considering everything, I am satisfied working at my school/department 82% The people that I work with care about each other on a personal level 81% I am satisfied with the level of supervision I receive 81% I am given fair opportunity to succeed in my school/department 80% My peers exhibit a strong belief that all students can excel if we all do our jobs well 79% For Example

10 Lowest Rated District: Many parents volunteer time to assist in my school 40% I am satisfied with the PD opportunities that are available to me 30% The people that I work with care about each other on a personal level 26% The parents at my school are very involved in their child’s school life 23% I work in a positive, professional work environment 23% The people that I work with trust and respect each other 23% The students in my school/district show respect for our teachers 23% I am clear about how performance will be evaluated 23% School/department leadership keeps me well informed about what is going on 23% School-wide/dept. meetings are a good use of my time 22% Lowest Rated National: Many parents volunteer time to assist in my school 38% I have time available during school/work to collaborate with my peers… 29% The parents at my school are very involved in their child’s school life 28% Parents at my school are very engaged in the learning of their child 25% School-wide/dept. meetings are a good use of my time 23% I am satisfied with the PD opportunities that are available to me 22% Staff development opportunities at my school/district are very relevant to my work 21% Teachers at my school are well-supported by the parents with respect to discipline issues 20% I am involved in the decisions that affect my work 19% Example 2

11 Climate and Culture Survey

12 Parent Engagement and Satisfaction Survey

13 Student Engagement Survey

14 Teacher Climate Survey


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