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Housing Development and Abandonment in New Orleans since 1960 www.gnocdc.org A product of Nonprofit Knowledge Works.

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Presentation on theme: "Housing Development and Abandonment in New Orleans since 1960 www.gnocdc.org A product of Nonprofit Knowledge Works."— Presentation transcript:

1 Housing Development and Abandonment in New Orleans since A product of Nonprofit Knowledge Works

2 New Orleans has lost 283,000 residents since 1960 when its population peaked at 627,525, but from a geographic perspective the city has grown since Sources: GNOCDC analysis of data from “Bienville’s Dilemma” by Richard Campanella and the U.S. Census Bureau. Population New Orleans

3 : Suburban development expands. Historic neighborhoods experience abandonment : Oil bust pummels economy. City vacancy rate soars except in newest developments along fringe : Demand for CBD housing and in “sliver by the river” picks up : Levee failures lead to widespread losses of households. Singles are attracted to “downtown living” but more households move out of the other “sliver” neighborhoods than move in. Housing development and abandonment trends within the city since 1960.

4 The areas of the city first to be developed were closer to the river in the more elevated parts of the city, and the last areas to be developed were the lowest lying sections of the city. Sources: Campanella, R. (2002). Time and place in New Orleans: Past geographies in the present day. Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican Publishing. Residential development zones New Orleans

5 Between 1960 and 1980, the number of occupied housing units in the city grew slightly even as population declined. Sources: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Population and occupied housing units New Orleans

6 Density of occupied housing units in New Orleans, 1960 Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau; Minnesota Population Center. National Historical Geographic Information System: Version 2.0. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota 2011.

7 Density of occupied housing units in New Orleans, 1980

8 Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau; Minnesota Population Center. National Historical Geographic Information System: Version 2.0. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Density of occupied housing units in New Orleans, 2000

9 From 1990 to 2000, some historic neighborhoods gain households. Change in occupied housing units, New Orleans' historic core Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Notes: The use of white on the map indicates very little or no change. GNOCDC normalized the 1990 and 2000 census blocks using the intersect tool in ArcGIS 10.0 in order to conduct a statistical analysis of occupied housing unit trends within a 3,000 sq. ft. radius of each individual census block. The resulting “heat” map demonstrates overall trends within an area; however, there are pockets of loss within areas of overall growth and pockets of growth within areas of overall loss.

10 Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau; Minnesota Population Center. National Historical Geographic Information System: Version 2.0. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Density of occupied housing units in New Orleans, 2010

11 Katrina caused widespread losses in occupied housing units across the city from 2000 to Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Note: GNOCDC aggregated 2000 census blocks to 2010 census tracts in order to calculate the change in occupied housing units by 2010 census tract. One census tract in Mid-City is white because it has zero occupied housing units in both 2000 and Another census tract in Viavant/ Venetian Isles is white because it had zero occupied housing units in 2000 and three in 2010, and thus experienced “infinite” growth. Percent change in occupied housing units by census tract, New Orleans

12 From 2000 to 2010, New Orleans’ CBD and Warehouse District gained households amidst declines in adjacent neighborhoods. Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Notes: The use of white on the map indicates very little or no change. GNOCDC normalized the 2000 and 2010 census blocks using the Census Bureau census block relationship file in order to conduct a statistical analysis of occupied housing unit trends within a 3,000 sq ft radius of each individual census block. The resulting “heat” map demonstrates overall trends within an area; however, there are pockets of loss within areas of overall growth and pockets of growth within areas of overall loss. Change in occupied housing units, New Orleans' historic core

13 Historic neighborhoods now have significant densities of abandoned homes. Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. “Other Vacant” housing unit density by census block, 2010 New Orleans

14 Black Pearl, Bywater, East Carrollton, East Riverside, Irish Channel, Touro, Uptown, and West Riverside lost households and experienced increased abandonment. Nearly every one of these has increased homeownership, but the inflow of new residents was overwhelmed by outflow of old residents. African American headed households, families with children, and elderly were the most likely to leave these neighborhoods. Even “sliver by the river” neighborhoods lost households and experienced abandonment between 2000 and 2010.

15 Housing development and abandonment across the metro since Sources: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Density of occupied housing units New Orleans metro

16 From 1960 to 1980, suburban development, particularly in Jefferson Parish, dramatically shifted the concentration of households away from the city. Sources: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Occupied housing units by parish New Orleans metro

17 From 1980 to 2000, growth in exurban parishes picks up pace. Sources: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Occupied housing units by parish New Orleans metro

18 Between 2000 and 2010, Katrina accelerates the shifting of households to northern and western exurban parishes. Sources: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Occupied housing units by parish New Orleans metro

19 To read the entire Housing Development and Abandonment in New Orleans since 1960 go to


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