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Concepts of Engineering and Technology Introduction to Engineering Fundamentals and Civilization Part 3 – Technology and Society Photo Courtesy of Gary.

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Presentation on theme: "Concepts of Engineering and Technology Introduction to Engineering Fundamentals and Civilization Part 3 – Technology and Society Photo Courtesy of Gary."— Presentation transcript:

1 Concepts of Engineering and Technology Introduction to Engineering Fundamentals and Civilization Part 3 – Technology and Society Photo Courtesy of Gary Payne/Denton Record-ChroniclePhoto Courtesy of Steve Van Meter, VideoRay 1 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

2 Twentieth Century The rate of innovation accelerated. The Industrial Revolution began in about 1750, but there were more agricultural workers than industrial workers until Important developments include: Electrification, Automobile, Airplane, Water Supply and Distribution, Electronics, Radio and Television, Mechanized Agriculture, Computers, Telephone, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Highways, Spacecraft, Internet 2 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

3 Requirements for a shift from agriculture to industry: A large supply of workers Adequate food and shelter for those workers An abundant energy source An efficient transportation system Large amounts of capital to invest The countries that had the best combination of these resources became dominant. 3 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

4 The Information Age A shift from industrialization to an economy based on information Characterized by the ability of individuals to transfer information freely Instant access to knowledge A key skill, the ability to assess and evaluate content Late 1970s to early 2000s 4 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

5 Technology is continuing to change, and the rate of change is increasing. Technological innovations affect, and are affected by, a society's cultural traditions. How did military applications influence technology development? Do humans have the ability to continue to adapt to the rate of technology change? What non-technologies have had the greatest influence on history? 5 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

6 4 categories of technical effects: 1 - Expected and Desired 2 - Expected and Undesired 3 - Unexpected but Desired 4 - Unexpected and Undesired 6 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

7 Ethics Sustainable design Waste prevention Recycling Conservation and Efficiency Clean energy Renewable energy We do not inherit the earth from our parents, we borrow it from our children. 7 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

8 When the nineteenth century drew to a close and the twentieth century began, there had been a series of significant structural failures, including some spectacular bridge failures. Most American state licensure laws require a bachelor of science degree for licensure. The U.S. model has generally been only to require those practicing independently (i.e., consulting engineers) to be licensed. Engineers working in industry, education, and sometimes government need not be licensed. 8 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

9 Fundamental Canons Engineers shall hold paramount the safety, health and welfare of the public and shall strive to comply with the principles of sustainable development in the performance of their professional duties. Engineers shall perform services only in areas of their competence. Engineers shall issue public statements only in an objective and truthful manner. Engineers shall act in professional matters for each employer or client as faithful agents or trustees, and shall avoid conflicts of interest. Engineers shall build their professional reputation on the merit of their services and shall not compete unfairly with others. Engineers shall act in such a manner as to uphold and enhance the honor, integrity, and dignity of the engineering profession and shall act with zero-tolerance for bribery, fraud, and corruption. Engineers shall continue their professional development throughout their careers, and shall provide opportunities for the professional development of those engineers under their supervision." 9 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

10 Where are we now? We now have a virtual communications network in a globalized society. Virtual networks allow us to transcend space and time with our interactions. Despite the fact we’re more connected than ever, we’re becoming more isolated than ever. The tools which make communication so easy encourage and promote less meaningful communication. Technology seems to have taken control of human interactions. 10 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

11 A wide range of activities - economic, dating, work, educational, financial, and so on - are increasingly affected by the new forms of interaction and communication that technologies themselves make possible. The culture of technology is no longer defined by information and information processing. It's defined by connectivity, relations, and communication Are these intended or unintended consequences? Further information found at: 11 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

12 12 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

13 Engineering and Technology, 1st ed. Hacker et al. Delmar Cengage Learning (2010). Engineering Design: An Introduction, 1st ed. Karsnitz, O’Brian, Hutchinson. Delmar Cengage Learning (2008). Engineering Your Future, 2nd ed. Gomez, Oakes, Leone. Great Lakes Press (2008). Gateway To Engineering, 1st ed. Rogers, Wright, Yates. Delmar Cengage Learning (2010). 13 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.


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