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The Life of the Buddha Part – 2. Renunciation One of the first people the Bodhisattva met after leaving his home was King Bimbisara, ruler of the Kingdom.

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Presentation on theme: "The Life of the Buddha Part – 2. Renunciation One of the first people the Bodhisattva met after leaving his home was King Bimbisara, ruler of the Kingdom."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Life of the Buddha Part – 2

2 Renunciation One of the first people the Bodhisattva met after leaving his home was King Bimbisara, ruler of the Kingdom of Magadha. King Bimbisara was so impressed with Siddhattha that he offered him half his kingdom to rule. Sidddhattha rejected this offer but promised to visit again should he attain enlightenment.

3 Renunciation One of the first people the Bodhisattva met after leaving his home was King Bimbisara, ruler of the Kingdom of Magadha. King Bimbisara was so impressed with Siddhattha that he offered him half his kingdom to rule. Sidddhattha rejected this offer but promised to visit again should he attain enlightenment.

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5 Renunciation King Bimbisara eventually became one of the Buddha’s strongest supporters. Sadly he was killed by his own son, King Ajatasattu, who later in his life also became a supporter of the Buddha. When Siddhattha returned to visit King Bimbisara after his enlightenment, the King donated a large park called the Bamboo Grove or Veluvana for the use of the Buddha and the Sangha.

6 Renunciation King Bimbisara eventually became one of the Buddha’s strongest supporters. Sadly he was killed by his own son, King Ajatasattu, who later in his life also became a supporter of the Buddha. When Siddhattha returned to visit King Bimbisara after his enlightenment, the King donated a large park called the Bamboo Grove or Veluvana for the use of the Buddha and the Sangha.

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10 Renunciation Prince Siddhattha eventually found his way to two well-known ascetics and meditation masters who each had their own large groups. They were called Alara Kalama and Uddaka Ramaputta and he studied under each of them in turn. He achieved their highest attainments and was even offered to take over their schools.

11 Renunciation Prince Siddhattha eventually found his way to two well-known ascetics and meditation masters who each had their own large groups. They were called Alara Kalama and Uddaka Ramaputta and he studied under each of them in turn. He achieved their highest attainments and was even offered to take over their schools.

12 Renunciation However, he rejected them as he found that even the highest levels of meditation that he attained through their teachings could not lead him to the truth that he was seeking. Siddhattha continued his wanderings and was eventually joined by five companions who then practiced extreme asceticism with him.

13 Renunciation However, he rejected them as he found that even the highest levels of meditation that he attained through their teachings could not lead him to the truth that he was seeking. Siddhattha continued his wanderings and was eventually joined by five companions who then practiced extreme asceticism with him.

14 Renunciation Extreme asceticism and self-mortification and torture were considered to be the means for self-purification and this is still being practiced in India today. For six years, the Bodhisattva practiced such things as sleeping on thorns, stopping his breathing and eating just a few grains of rice a day.

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21 Renunciation Extreme asceticism and self-mortification and torture were considered to be the means for self-purification and this is still being practiced in India today. For six years, the Bodhisattva practiced such things as sleeping on thorns, stopping his breathing and eating just a few grains of rice a day.

22 Renunciation He became so emaciated that his skin turned black and he could touch his backbone through his belly. Siddhattha became little more that a skeleton on the verge of death. He then realized that neither extreme practices and self torture, nor a life of luxury and indulgence was the way to enlightenment.

23 Renunciation He became so emaciated that his skin turned black and he could touch his backbone through his belly. Siddhattha became little more that a skeleton on the verge of death. He then realized that neither extreme practices and self torture, nor a life of luxury and indulgence was the way to enlightenment.

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26 Renunciation He became so emaciated that his skin turned black and he could touch his backbone through his belly. Siddhattha became little more that a skeleton on the verge of death. He then realized that neither extreme practices and self torture, nor a life of luxury and indulgence was the way to enlightenment.

27 Renunciation He began to understand that a fit and healthy body was necessary for a clear mind and started to take some food sparingly to nourish his body. At this point, his 5 companions abandoned him as they thought that he had given up trying to attain enlightenment. Siddhattha was now left on his own.

28 Renunciation He began to understand that a fit and healthy body was necessary for a clear mind and started to take some food sparingly to nourish his body. At this point, his 5 companions abandoned him as they thought that he had given up trying to attain enlightenment. Siddhattha was now left on his own.

29 Renunciation He began to understand that a fit and healthy body was necessary for a clear mind and started to take some food sparingly to nourish his body. At this point, his 5 companions abandoned him as they thought that he had given up trying to attain enlightenment. Siddhattha was now left on his own.

30 Renunciation Siddhattha found his way to Bodhgaya and according to legend, a village girl called Sujata offered him some milk rice as he was meditating under a tree. She mistook him for a tree deity. After taking the meal and a rest, Siddhattha proceeded to a Bodhi tree to meditate and a grass-cutter called Sotthiya offered him some grass to sit on.

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33 Renunciation Siddhattha found his way to Bodhgaya and according to legend, a village girl called Sujata offered him some milk rice as he was meditating under a tree. She mistook him for a tree deity. After taking the meal and a rest, Siddhattha proceeded to a Bodhi tree to meditate and a grass-cutter called Sotthiya offered him some grass to sit on.

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35 Renunciation Siddhattha then vowed that he will not get up from that seat even though his flesh and body would dry up, until he attained enlightenment. He then began to enter into deep meditation. As he was about to attain enlightenment, Mara and his forces assailed the Bodhisattva to get him to give up.

36 Renunciation Siddhattha then vowed that he will not get up from that seat even though his flesh and body would dry up, until he attained enlightenment. He then began to enter into deep meditation. As he was about to attain enlightenment, Mara and his forces assailed the Bodhisattva to get him to give up.

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38 Renunciation Mara can be taken symbolically to mean the personification of all the distractions, doubts and temptations in Siddhattha’s mind, coming in the way of his enlightenment. Deep in the meditation of the mindfulness of breathing, the Bodhisattva overcame Mara, finally attained enlightenment and became the Buddha.

39 Renunciation Mara can be taken symbolically to mean the personification of all the distractions, doubts and temptations in Siddhattha’s mind, coming in the way of his enlightenment. Deep in the meditation of the mindfulness of breathing, the Bodhisattva overcame Mara, finally attained enlightenment and became the Buddha.

40 Renunciation The Buddha during this process of enlightenment saw : 1.His past lives; 2.How beings arise, pass away and arise according to their own kamma; 3.The realization of the way out of suffering which is Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path.

41 Renunciation The Buddha during this process of enlightenment saw : 1.His past lives; 2.How beings arise, pass away and arise according to their own kamma; 3.The realization of the way out of suffering which is Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path.

42 Renunciation The Buddha during this process of enlightenment saw : 1.His past lives; 2.How beings arise, pass away and arise according to their own kamma; 3.The realization of the way out of suffering which is Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path.

43 Renunciation The Buddha during this process of enlightenment saw : 1.His past lives; 2.How beings arise, pass away and arise according to their own kamma; 3.The realization of the way out of suffering which is Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path.

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48 Sheltered by the Naga King On the 6 th week of Enlightenment, there was a great storm and the Naga King Mucalinda came out of his abode, and coiled round the body of the Buddha to protect him. At the end of the week, King Mucalinda appeared before the Buddha as a young man and with joined hands, paid his respects.

49 Sheltered by the Naga King On the 6 th week of Enlightenment, there was a great storm and the Naga King Mucalinda came out of his abode, and coiled round the body of the Buddha to protect him. At the end of the week, King Mucalinda appeared before the Buddha as a young man and with joined hands, paid his respects.

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55 Sheltered by the Naga King On the 6 th week of Enlightenment, there was a great storm and the Naga King Mucalinda came out of his abode, and coiled round the body of the Buddha to protect him. At the end of the week, King Mucalinda appeared before the Buddha as a young man and with joined hands, paid his respects.

56 Sheltered by the Naga King There is actually a place in India called “Nagaland”, in the north-east populated by many different hill tribes. Also, the city of “Nagpur” means “City of the Snakes”. At the end of the week, King Mucalinda appeared before the Buddha as a young man and with joined hands, paid his respects.

57 Sheltered by the Naga King There is actually a place in India called “Nagaland”, in the north-east populated by many different hill tribes. Also, the city of “Nagpur” means “City of the Snakes”. So it is possible that a tribe or community of people called Nagas gave shelter to the Buddha in bad weather, and this became exaggerated or misunderstood.

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59 After Enlightenment After spending some time enjoying the bliss of His enlightenment, the Buddha set out for Isipatana, or the Deer Park, at Sarnath to rejoin his former five companions to teach them the truths which He had now realized. At first, they did not welcome Him as they felt He had gone back to His life of comfort but they saw with their own eyes, His new and confident demeanour.

60 After Enlightenment After spending some time enjoying the bliss of His enlightenment, the Buddha set out for Isipatana, or the Deer Park, at Sarnath to rejoin his former five companions to teach them the truths which He had now realized. At first, they did not welcome Him as they felt He had gone back to His life of comfort but they saw with their own eyes, His new and confident demeanour.

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62 After Enlightenment The Buddha taught them His first discourse, the Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta, or the “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion ” discourse. Kondanna, the eldest and wisest of the five companions became a Stream- Enterer after listening to this teaching.

63 After Enlightenment The Buddha taught them His first discourse, the Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta, or the “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion ” discourse. Kondanna, the eldest and wisest of the five companions became a Stream- Enterer after listening to this teaching.

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65 After Enlightenment After the Buddha gave His second discourse, the Anattalakkhana Sutta, or the “Discourse on Non-Self”, all five companions became enlightened. There were now 6 Arahants in the world, including the Buddha Himself.

66 After Enlightenment After the Buddha gave His second discourse, the Anattalakkhana Sutta, or the “Discourse on Non-Self”, all five companions became enlightened. There were now 6 Arahants in the world, including the Buddha Himself.

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72 After Enlightenment The Buddha then began a long 45 year career of teaching, wandering from place to place throughout northern India. One of the places He spent a lot of time at (19 rains retreats) was the Jetavana Grove near to the city of Savatthi. This was the second monastery donated to the Buddha and was given by a millionaire called Anathapindika, the Buddha’s greatest lay supporter.

73 After Enlightenment The Buddha then began a long 45 year career of teaching, wandering from place to place throughout northern India. One of the places He spent a lot of time at (19 rains retreats) was the Jetavana Grove near to the city of Savatthi. This was the second monastery donated to the Buddha and was given by a millionaire called Anathapindika, the Buddha’s greatest lay supporter.

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77 After Enlightenment The Buddha had two chief disciples, Ven. Sariputta and Ven. Moggallana. They were initially followers of other teachers but converted to Buddhism. Ven. Sariputta was known for his wisdom and Ven. Moggallana for his psychic powers. They are usually represented at the main altars of Theravada temples with Ven. Moggallana portrayed as having dark skin.

78 After Enlightenment The Buddha had two chief disciples, Ven. Sariputta and Ven. Moggallana. They were initially followers of other teachers but converted to Buddhism. Ven. Sariputta was known for his wisdom and Ven. Moggallana for his psychic powers. They are usually represented at the main altars of Theravada temples with Ven. Moggallana portrayed as having dark skin.

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80 After Enlightenment The Buddha eventually passed away into final Nibbana at the age of 80, in a small place called Kusinara. He was cremated nearby and His remains distributed among the representatives of eight kingdoms. The National Museum of India in New Delhi houses probably some of the few genuine relics of the Buddha remaining in the world.

81 After Enlightenment The Buddha eventually passed away into final Nibbana at the age of 80, in a small place called Kusinara. He was cremated nearby and His remains distributed among the representatives of eight kingdoms. The National Museum of India in New Delhi houses probably some of the few genuine relics of the Buddha remaining in the world.

82 After Enlightenment The Buddha eventually passed away into final Nibbana at the age of 80, in a small place called Kusinara. He was cremated nearby and His remains distributed among the representatives of eight kingdoms. The National Museum of India in New Delhi houses probably some of the few genuine relics of the Buddha remaining in the world.

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87 After Enlightenment The last words of the Buddha were : “All things are subject to change. Strive on with diligence for your own salvation.”

88 After Enlightenment The last words of the Buddha were : “All things are subject to change. Strive on with diligence for your own salvation.”

89 After Enlightenment The last words of the Buddha were : “All things are subject to change. Strive on with diligence for your own salvation.”

90 Prepared by T Y Lee


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