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Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Understanding Drug and Alcohol Problems Information for Managers and Employees in a Drug-Free.

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Presentation on theme: "Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Understanding Drug and Alcohol Problems Information for Managers and Employees in a Drug-Free."— Presentation transcript:

1 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Understanding Drug and Alcohol Problems Information for Managers and Employees in a Drug-Free Workplace Ohio State University Employee Assistance Program Presents: Ohio State as a Drug Free Workplace

2 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Objectives After reviewing this information, you will be able to understand: – OSU as a Drug Free Workplace What does it mean to me? – Review drug and alcohol problems Understand terms: Use, Abuse and Addiction – What can be done if there is a problem How to identify if there is an issue When to get help How to get help Why to get help

3 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles What is a Drug Free Workplace Federal mandate for Ohio State. There are two federal requirements that apply to Ohio State: – Drug Free Workplace- requirement for all recipients of federal grants or contracts to comply. – Drug Free Schools- easy to tell why this applies. Failure to comply can result in reduction of federal funding.

4 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Focus of DFWP is safety Safety for students, faculty, staff and visitors. Drug and alcohol use on the job: – Can lead to more accidents. – Increases the possibility of violence. Alcohol and drugs used on the job do not contribute to a high performance workplace.

5 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Ohio State has responsibilities Maintain a safe and drug/alcohol free environment. Make information on drug and alcohol use available to Ohio State employees and students. Maintain any information about employees with drug/alcohol issues in a confidential need to know only basis.

6 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Ohio State does drug testing Random testing for specific safety related positions (ex.- bus drivers). Can do for cause testing is someone is suspected because of actions, behavior or appearance. Some select areas use post-offer, pre-employment testing. Ohio State does not test everyone on a random basis.

7 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Employees have responsibilities You should not possess, use, sell, manufacture, or distribute illegal drugs or prescription drugs (other than as prescribed) while on or in any university property or vehicle. You should not be under the influence of alcohol while on paid university time or use a university vehicle under the influence. If you are convicted for a drug or alcohol related felony, any part of which involved work, you are required to report this to your supervisor within 3 days of the conviction.

8 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Not everyone who uses alcohol or experiments with illegal drugs becomes addicted. People with drug and/or alcohol problems often are unhappy with their lives. They are usually unable to see that their use of alcohol and/or drugs is a major contributing factor to their unhappiness. Alcohol or drug addiction is characterized by repeated failures to control use, an increase in the number and severity of problems caused by use, and the consumption of greater amounts of the substance. Understanding alcohol and drug problems

9 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Various terms are used to describe problem use. The differences between use, abuse and addiction are not easily recognized based on isolated observable behaviors that individuals may exhibit. The following descriptions of use, abuse and addiction are used by health care professionals who specialize in drug and alcohol disorders and reflect the progression that may occur. Understanding alcohol and drug problems

10 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Alcohol and other drugs may be used in a socially accepted or medically authorized manner to modify or control mood or state of mind. Examples include having a drink with friends or taking an anti-anxiety agency as prescribed by a physician. There are many different ways that people use alcohol and other drugs without necessarily becoming addicted. Use before or while at work is not appropriate in a Drug-Free Workplace. Use patterns - can lead to problems

11 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Experimental use – Occasional use of alcohol or illegal drugs, often seen in teenagers and young adults. Social/recreational use – Drinking is both permitted and accepted to a point in American society. Even excessive use may be condoned at times. This is considered social use as long as it doesn’t create problems. Illegal use of drugs are sometimes considered recreational, but can cause legal problems quickly. As a stress reliever – Some people use alcohol or drugs to relieve stress/cope. If this is infrequent and doesn’t create more stress or difficulties for the individual or those around them, it may not lead to addiction. NOTE – Addiction often begins with relief drinking. Use- Definition of terms

12 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles The use of a substance to modify or control mood or state of mind in a manner that is illegal or harmful to oneself or others is considered problematic use, or abuse. Examples of potential consequences of harmful use are: – Accidents or injuries – Blackouts – Legal problems – Poor job performance – Family problems – Health problems Abuse – Definition

13 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles For some individuals, occasional use and even abuse of alcohol or drugs will occur without consequence. For others, abuse continues despite repeated attempts to return to more social or controlled use and leads to addiction. Addiction is characterized by the repeated, compulsive seeking or use of a substance despite adverse social, psychological and/or physical consequences. Addiction- Definition

14 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Chronic - Once you have developed an addiction, you will always have to deal with it. Should you attempt to resume “normal” use after quitting, you are vey likely to rapidly return to addictive, out of control use and abuse. Progressive - Addiction gets worse over time and the physical, emotional, and social changes are often cumulative. There are biochemical changes in the nervous system and repeated use causes progressive damage. Primary - Addiction is not just a symptom of some underlying psychological problem, a developmental stage, or a reaction to stress. Once your use of alcohol or drugs has become an addiction, the addiction itself needs to be medically treated as the primary illness. Terminal - Addiction to alcohol and/or other drugs often leads to disease and possibly death. Addiction is all of the following:

15 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Addiction is a family disease. Some people with a history of substance abuse in their family are more susceptible to developing problems with addiction. This is due to heredity as well as learned behavior. Prior abuse of alcohol and other drugs has a great impact on developing future problems. A pattern of abuse develops and can lead to addiction and psychological reliance on drugs and/or alcohol. Other contributing factors. Some people abuse alcohol and drugs as part of a self-destructive lifestyle. Other people start to use substances to seek relief from depression or crisis in their lives. Risk of addiction

16 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Awareness of signs and symptoms is important. Ignoring the issue will not promote change or resolution. There is usually ample evidence of a problem if you are willing to recognize the connection between the behavior you observe and the drug and alcohol use. No one wants to believe that a friend, coworker, or family member has a substance abuse problem. Subtle changes in behavior often are discounted. Signs that someone is developing a problem with alcohol and/or drugs cover a wide range and many of them are apparent on the job. Changes in friends, lack of interest in old hobbies, and increasing isolation are all minimized. What can I do? Know signs and symptoms

17 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Can anyone recognize the problem? Yes – There are things that become apparent. If you are aware of these things, you can suggest to your employee, friend, or coworker that they should consider getting help. This simple suggestion may save their life.

18 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Aggression Mood swings Burnout/compassion fatigue Anxiety/anxiousness Depression Paranoia Denial Emotional symptoms to watch for

19 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Slow reaction time Slowed or slurred speech Irritability Excessive talking Inability to sit still Limited attention span Lashing out toward others Inability to make decisions Poor motivation and lack of energy Behavioral symptoms to watch for

20 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Weight loss Impaired coordination Sweating Chills Susceptible to colds and flu like symptoms Excessive fatigue Smell of alcohol or other substances Physical symptoms that can be observed

21 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Screening Tool: helps to know what to do The next two slides are simple check off lists By using this simple guided approach, it becomes easier to explore if there is a problem If a problem exists, try to get the affected individual to seek professional help

22 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Ask yourself… HAVE YOU NOTICED:YESNO Recent changes in behavior such as sudden lack of pride in personal appearance? Dramatic change in appetite or eating habits? Weight loss or gain? Trouble sleeping or a desire to sleep all the time? Poor performance in school or on the job? Difficulty concentrating? Nervousness or agitation? Loss of energy or excessive fatigue?

23 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Constant expression of worthlessness or self-hatred? Unnecessary risk taking? Sudden change in choice of companions? Drugs or alcohol missing from home? Items of value missing from home or office? Lying, avoiding friends, and concealing problems? Unexplainable large amounts of money? Ask yourself… HAVE YOU NOTICED:YESNO If the number of "YES" answers is greater than the number of "NO" answers, there is a strong indication of alcohol and/or drug abuse and possibly addiction.

24 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles The abuse of alcohol or other drugs affects everyone around the person. Whether it is a relative, friend, loved one, or a coworker who has a problem, the impact can be felt on the job. More often than not, those affected by someone who has a drug or alcohol problem adapt their behaviors to, minimize, struggle, or otherwise cope with the person's substance abuse. Some of the behaviors that families and friends adopt are called "enabling." Enabling is action that you take to protect the person with the problem from the consequences of his or her actions. Unfortunately, enabling actually helps the person not deal with the problem. Family and coworker impact

25 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Covering Up - providing alibis, making excuses, or even doing an impaired coworker's work rather than allowing it to be known that he/she is not meeting his/her responsibilities. Rationalizing - developing reasons why the person's continued use is understandable or acceptable. Withdrawing - avoiding contact with the person with the problem. Blaming - blaming yourself for the substance abuser's continued use or getting angry at the individual for not trying hard enough to control his/her use or to get help. Controlling - trying to take responsibility for the person's use by throwing out his/her drugs or cutting off the supply. Threatening - saying that you will take action (ceasing to cover up, turning the person in, terminating the relationship) if the person doesn't control his/her use, but not following through when he/she repeatedly uses. AVOID THESE BEHAVIORS. They don’t help you or others. Examples of “enabling” behavior

26 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Often, the person with a problem will consciously or unconsciously use a variety of behaviors to guard against being confronted. You may see or hear: Sympathy: Trying to get you involved in his/her personal problems. Excuses: Having increasingly unlikely explanations for everything that happens. Apology: Being very sorry and promising that they will change…"It won't happen again." Diversions: Trying to get you to talk about other issues in life or in the workplace. Innocence: Claiming he/she is not the cause of the problems you observe, but rather the victim... "It isn't true." "I didn't know." "Everyone is against me." Anger: Exhibiting physically intimidating behavior, blaming others…"It's your fault I drink." Pity: Using emotional blackmail to elicit your sympathy and guilt…"You know what I'm going through. How can you do this to me now?" Tears: Falling apart and expressing remorse upon confrontation. BE PREPARED TO STICK TO THE FACTS What you may see or hear if you talk with someone

27 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles If you encounter these responses when confronting a employee, friend, coworker, or loved one at home about his/her behavior, you may want to consult the Ohio State Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Your EAP can help you understand next steps in dealing with a substance abuser and give you pointers about how to most effectively confront the individual. When talking to the person with the problem, you will want to be straightforward and serious about the problem. Convey that you care and are worried and encourage him or her to follow up with the EAP or seek other help. Remember: You did not cause it…You cannot control it…You cannot cure it. Next Steps

28 Click icon to add picture Click to edit Master text styles Resources Call for help anytime with questions or issues Ohio State Employee Assistance Program answered 24/7 Office of Human Resources Local HR representative


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