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The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking Autobiography: “Self-Written Life” Biography: “Written Life” Practice First- and Third-Person Narration Feature Menu.

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Presentation on theme: "The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking Autobiography: “Self-Written Life” Biography: “Written Life” Practice First- and Third-Person Narration Feature Menu."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking Autobiography: “Self-Written Life” Biography: “Written Life” Practice First- and Third-Person Narration Feature Menu

3 Who’s telling this story? The narrator is the person who tells the story. Different kinds of narrators can tell you different kinds of information. The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking What about this one?

4 What does the second narrator tell you that the first one does not? The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking The first narrator is Michael. He doesn’t want to tell this information—yet. Why doesn’t the first narrator tell the story the same way? Michael has been late three times this week. Michael has to go to detention on Monday. Michael has to bring back a parent’s signature on the piece of paper.

5 When Michael tells his own story, he is a first- person narrator. The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking A story told from the first-person point of view tells one version of events— the narrator’s own version reveals only the narrator’s thoughts or feelings uses first-person pronouns: I, me, us, our, my, mine

6 Where is the narrator in the second story? The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking The narrator is not a character. The narrator is not in the story at all.

7 can tell more than one character’s version of events When another person—a writer—tells Michael’s story, the story is told from the third-person point of view. A third-person narrator The Narrator: Look Who’s Talking [End of Section] reveals words, thoughts, and feelings of all characters uses third-person pronouns: he, she, they, them, his, hers

8 Nonfiction is writing based on fact—”not fiction.” Autobiography is the most personal kind of nonfiction. Autobiography: “Self-Written Life” When you write about something that happened to you, you are telling an autobiographical story.

9 An autobiography is the writer’s story of his or her own life, written from the first-person point of view. Autobiography: “Self-Written Life” autographybio means selflifewriting means [End of Section]

10 A biography is the story of a person’s life written by another person from the third-person point of view. Biography: “Written Life” The biographer learns about the person through research: interviews historical accounts articlesjournals diariesletters The biographer is not the subject of the story.

11 A person’s whole life can’t fit into a biography. Not every detail is important. Biography: “Written Life” The writer has to choose what to include—and what to leave out. That is also true when you write about yourself. What you had for lunch every day when you were three is probably not very important. [End of Section]

12 2. What is the point of view in the story? 1. Who is telling this story? Let’s Try It “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice

13 Let’s Try It 1. Who is telling this story? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice “I” is telling the story. The character does not have a name here.

14 Let’s Try It 2. What is the point of view in the story? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice The story is told from the first- person point of view.

15 Let’s Try It 4. Why are some third-person pronouns used? 3. How do you know this story is told from the first-person point of view? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice

16 Let’s Try It 3. How do you know this story is told from the first-person point of view? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice First-person pronouns are used to tell the story.

17 Let’s Try It 4. Why are some third-person pronouns used? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice A first-person narrator has to use third-person pronouns to talk about other characters.

18 Let’s Try It 6. What kinds of information does the narrator give about the other character? 5. What kinds of information does the narrator give about himself or herself? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice

19 Let’s Try It 5. What kinds of information does the narrator give about himself or herself? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice We know what the narrator says and also what he or she thinks and feels.

20 Let’s Try It 6. What kinds of information does the narrator give about the other character? “What did you do today?” she asked, as she turned the key and opened the door. “Nothing much…really.” I knew she heard the hesitation in my voice. I knew she’d ask more questions—questions I didn’t feel much like answering. “Nothing much. OK.” Her voice was flat. “Put your stuff away and come talk to me.” It was my own fault. I’d given myself away. Now I would have to explain that piece of paper in my pocket. Practice We know what she says but not what she thinks or feels. We learn about her from the narrator.

21 On Your Own Draw a time line of your own life. Label the left end “Birth” and the right end “Now.” Above the line, write two or three major events in your life. Practice Pick one of the events and write a paragraph about it from the first-person point of view, as if you were writing an autobiography. Then write about the same event from the third-person point of view, as if you were writing a biography.

22 First- and Third-Person Narration The End


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