Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Newark Public Schools January 2014 Successes to Date and One Newark Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Newark Public Schools January 2014 Successes to Date and One Newark Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only."— Presentation transcript:

1 Newark Public Schools January 2014 Successes to Date and One Newark Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only

2 2 Unemployment rate in 2008Median annual earnings in 2008 School Reform and Economic Opportunity Maintaining the status quo has a catastrophic impact on our students’ life options

3 Magnet Schools admission process Adolescent-focused programs Early Childhood Education programs Charters as Partner transformation – sharing training and promising practices School Turn Arounds Ensure all students graduate college-ready Develop effective professionals in every classroom Cultivate transformational school leaders Provide top tier school options for all students Re-imagine NPS as service-oriented team Re-imagine NPS as service-oriented team Engage and involve stakeholders to contribute to college readiness Confidential Draft Working Document Performance data Gap between school and home Strategic partnerships High expectations for students, schools, and NPS Optimize resources Data and technical infrastructure Transform operations Restructure teams Core values Recruit and retain School-based progress reports Best-in-class training School-based budgeting Layer above school Breakthrough contract Teacher pipeline Teacher teams/peer support Teacher evaluation Breakthrough contract College-going culture Common Core ACT Higher Education Partnerships Social and emotional learning Building college knowledge Technology 3 Phase 1 ( ) – Conditions for Success

4 4 Key Accomplishments: Phase 1 (2011 – 2014) Academic achievement is improving o Graduation rates have increased by 10% / HSPA Graduation rates have increased by 8% o The number of “good” K-8 schools has increased from 15 to 18 (charters from 5 to 6, NPS from 10 to 12) and “on the move” schools from 5 to 12 (charters from 1 to 3, NPS from 4 to 9) Newark is a leader in teacher quality o Worked with teachers to implement a landmark contract focus on: Comprehensive Reform Teacher Contract Implementation significantly changed compensation, teacher input into evaluations, turnaround schools, and flexibility at the school level o Awarded 4,500 teachers $31M in one-time special payments o Recognized 200 “highly effective” teachers with $1.3M in August 2013 Transformational school leaders have become a Newark hallmark o Hired 50 new excellent principals (from a pool of nearly 400) who now have the flexibility and support to transform their schools o Radically changed the “layer above the principal” with 6 new Assistant Superintendents, themselves previously principals who achieved breakthrough results o Launched the Principal Leadership Institute, with aspirations of becoming the “West Point” of principal leadership development

5 5 Key Accomplishments: Phase 1 (2011 – 2014) School quality options have expanded o Opened 10 Renew schools (eight K–8 and two high schools) in place of the 12 lowest-performing schools; all have extended day, community organizing, social and emotional supports for students, and a hand-picked staff; enrollment is up in these schools for the first time in a decade o Opened five new district schools (e.g., Eagle Academy for Young Men and Newark Academy for Girls) o Launched citywide high school choice process – with near universal student participation – providing more equitable access to magnets and new schools; far more students got into the schools of their choice Central Office is transforming o Reorganized central office to focus on supporting schools, parents and families o Launched the Office of Family and Community Engagement, Talent Office (formerly “human resources”), Office of Strategy and Innovation and The Curriculum Office

6 6 Key Accomplishments: Phase 1 (2011 – 2014) o Central Office is transforming, continued o The Curriculum Office has: o Implemented new, Common-Core aligned curricula in literacy and math. o Provided PARCC-aligned interim assessments in literacy and math for grades o Provided professional development and fostered teacher leadership to support Common Core implementation. o Partnered with Student Achievement Partners to develop model Common-Core aligned curricula (e.g, Basal Alignment Project). o Aligned the implementation of the NPS Teacher Framework with Common Core curricula.

7 7 All students in Newark are in excellent schools and thriving communities, and are on the path to excel in college and 21 st century careers Phase 2 (2014 to 2017): One Newark: 100 Excellent Schools

8 8 Core Principles of One Newark One Newark’s commitment is to ensure our children have 100 Excellent Schools. Out of 100 schools in Newark, only 20 are currently good. Excellence: All schools, charter and district, will be judged according to the same rigorous scorecard, and the results will be available to everyone. We will continue to grow high- performing schools while ensuring that district schools enjoy the same conditions that allow the charters to succeed. Equity: Our students with the greatest challenges – from the poorest homes, with disabilities, English language learners and those involved with the court system – will be served with great schools first, not last. Efficiency: We will ensure that our workforce matches our budget, but will retain our top performing educators who will make our schools great and limit the impact of job cuts on our communities. We will not allow empty or dilapidated school buildings to become a blight on our communities.

9 9 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Challenge #1: Chronic Under-Achievement Many schools are not putting students on a path to college or a great career NPS and Charter K-8 Schools by Performance Group, to In , 75% of district K-8 schools were classified as “Low” −Low = low proficiency and low growth All schools are improving, while charters are demonstrating what is possible −In , district K-8 schools classified as “low” decreased to 60% −Since , the number of “low” charter schools has declined by appx. 50% Performance Group Definitions based student performance on the NJ ASK: Low: Average LAL Proficiency is below 200, and median Student Growth Percentile (SGP) is below 50. On the Move: Average LAL Proficiency is below 200, but median SGP is above 50 or SGP has improved by 8 points. Good: Average LAL Proficiency is above 200.

10 10 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Challenge #1: Chronic Under-Achievement Many schools are not putting students on a path to college or a great career Since 2011, NPS graduation rate has increased to 68% -- and the HESPA graduation rate from 31% to 42%.

11 11 Challenge #2: Declining Enrollment Families are “voting with their feet” and choosing other options K-12 Students in Newark, to There has been a significant shift in NPS student enrollment due to charter growth −NPS will have gone from serving 95% of students in school year to about 60% by school year About half of our families are expressing dissatisfaction with NPS and are seeking other options Approximately 8,000 students are in charter schools and 10,000 families are on waiting lists −In the South ward alone, 40% of families are applying for charter seats −We see a similar phenomenon in high schools and in non-NPS run Early Childhood sites This is based on charters that have already been approved growing to scale. Charter (%)21%25%29%33%36% District (%)79%75%71%67%64%

12 12 Challenge #3: Ongoing Fiscal Challenges As we seek to build the strongest future portfolio of schools for Newark, we will grapple with significant budget implications Note: Assumes a revenue downside case Source: NPS Data NPS Budget, to P As students leave, so does the funding By school year alone, 36% of NPS’ general fund will be charter payments Charter Payment as % of Total 12%14%17%21%25%28%36% Charter Payment $92M$117M$148M$182M$207M$230M$249M General Fund (less Chrt. Pmt) $686M$740M$727M$685M$630M$583M$540M Grants and Entitlements $15M$127M$137M$129M$125M$121M$118M

13 13 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Source: NPS facilities Data For decades, accumulated wear and insufficient resources have caused the district’s school buildings to steadily deteriorate, and they are now in the worst condition they have ever been We must prioritize buildings that can – with significant investments – become 21 st century learning environments. −NPS would need between over $1B to bring all buildings in Newark to 21 st century standards; $890M is our best/most utilized facilities are prioritized −If we prioritize, it would cost $600 million and $750 million to bring schools up to NPS standards Challenge #4: Un-level Playing Field We must focus on high quality staff and high quality schools

14 14 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only 100 Excellent Schools To make good on our promise for a One Newark, we must accomplish 7 things 1.Implement a common accountability framework that holds all schools – both district and charter – to the same standards 2.Maximize a universal enrollment system that ensures equity and transparency, while creating an easy to understand enrollment process for families 3.Fix our crumbling schools by investing in 21st century learning environments, making difficult decisions about which facilities we must divest and which facilities we will prioritize, and holding the State accountable for solutions that break through the red tape 4.Advocate for policies, including waivers from existing statutes, that will allow us to consider quality along with years of service while making decisions about “right-sizing” our workforce 5.Support Newarkers who may be impacted by district transitions through education, job training, and other support 6.Ensure there are excellent schools and no vacant buildings in every ward by collaborating with high-performing charters and consolidating NPS’ resources to run fewer, better schools 7.Grow NPS’ capacity to innovate in order to meet diverse student needs, which will require us to invest in new priorities and to stop funding the failed policies and actions from the past

15 15 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Long-term Ward Plans Our Seven Guiding Questions for Planning 1.What is the quality of our buildings? How do we ensure we have a plan for every single building? How do we invest money in our best and/or most used facilities? 2.How many early childhood classrooms currently exist? How do we create conditions for strong oversight, community engagement and management? How do we consolidate sites to ensure quality? 3.How many district K-8 schools do we need based on enrollment trends? How do we bring back and retain students for our K-8 schools? How do we work with high performing K-8 charters to align supply and demand? 4.What are the different options available for high school students? How do we ensure that school offerings in high school are most aligned to student needs – and represent diverse school models? 5.How does the plan preserve history and community? What can be done to acknowledge and preserve our educational institutions? 6.What will be the impact on neighborhoods? How do we ensure quality schools in all neighborhoods? 7.Which buildings do we need to divest (e.g., monetize or level)?

16 16 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Appendix

17 17 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only South Ward Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Invest in early childhood hubs Relocate ECC-South from Clinton Avenue to Chancellor Annex Repurpose Maple as an ECC o Consolidate district standalone sites to ECC-Maple Early Childhood: 33 district classrooms across 9 locations District and provider sites in the South have the lowest ECERS scores* ECC-South is currently located in a building unacceptable for children K-8s: All district K-8 schools in the South ward are classified as low quality As a result of family demand and charter growth, NPS K-8 enrollment will decline from 5,800 students in to 3,200 students in % of South ward families are enrolled in charter schools Vision: Accelerate achievement and double- down on good facilities Accelerate progress at Peshine, Chancellor, and Avon Invest in three Renew schools located in good facilities o Belmont Runyon o George Washington Carver o Louise A. Spencer Allow proven charter schools to manage district K-8s o Madison at Newark Legacy o Hawthorne at TEAM o Bragaw at TEAM Resite Bruce Street to Technology Redesign Miller and resite to Spencer * ECERS: Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale. ECERS is an assessment of early childhood program environments and focuses on “process quality,” which is more highly predictive of outcomes than structural indicators. ECERS is scored on a 1 to 7 scale, with 7 representing the ideal

18 18 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only South Ward, continued Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Create attractive and diverse options for all students Accelerate progress at University High School Revive Weequahic o Eagle Academy at Weequahic o Girls Academy at Weequahic Revive Shabazz o Open Transfer School A at Shabazz o Continue to redesign Shabazz as athletic academies High School: Magnets attract the highest-performing students leaving the comprehensives with heavy concentrations of higher need students 14% of ninth grade students entered high school in not proficient, over-age, or both Seven NPS high schools will be underutilized by Facilities: It will cost over $350M to bring all South ward buildings up to 21st century standards and over $260M to district standards Vision: Implement a plan for every building that supports economic stability Invest $190 million in NPS schools Work with high performing charter operators: o TEAM at Bragaw, Hawthorne, William H. Brown, and Clinton o Newark Legacy at Madison Divest Miller and Maple Annex Retain Banneker, Dayton, and Pathways for NPS use

19 19 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only West Ward Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Invest in early childhood hubs. Accelerate progress at ECC-West at Old Speedway Re-purpose Roseville as an ECC o Consolidate district standalone sites to ECC-Roseville Early Childhood: 20 district classrooms across 8 locations District and provider sites in the West ward have the low ECERS scores * K-8s: 8 out of 9 district K-8 schools in the West ward are classified as low quality As a result of family demand and charter growth, district K-8 enrollment in the West ward will decline from 4,900 students in to 3,100 students in % of West ward families are enrolled in charter schools Vision: Accelerate achievement and double- down on good facilities Accelerate progress Lincoln, Mt. Vernon, Sussex, JFK, and Thirteenth Avenue Invest in two Renew schools located in good facilities: o Horton o Speedway Redesign Ivy Hill Allow proven a charter school to a manage district K-8: o Alexander * ECERS: Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale. ECERS is an assessment of early childhood program environments and focuses on “process quality,” which is more highly predictive of outcomes than structural indicators. ECERS is scored on a 1 to 7 scale, with 7 representing the ideal

20 20 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only West Ward, continued Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Create attractive and diverse options for all students Revive West Side o Open Transfer School B at West Side o Resite Newark Early College to West Side Campus High School: Magnets attract the highest-performing students leaving the comprehensives with heavy concentrations of higher need students 14% of ninth grade students entered high school in not proficient, over-age, or both Seven NPS high schools will be underutilized by Facilities: It will cost over $240M to bring all West ward buildings up to 21st century standards and over $160M to district standards Vision: Implement a plan for every building that supports economic stability Invest in $150M NPS schools Work with a high performing charter operator: Alexander

21 21 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Central Ward Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Continue progress at ECC sites Accelerate progress at district standalone sites Early Childhood: 9 district classrooms across 4 locations District and provider sites in the Central ward have satisfactory ECERS scores* K-8s: 13 out of 14 district K-8 schools in the Central ward are classified as low quality As a result of family demand and charter growth, district K-8 enrollment in the Central ward will decline from 5,900 students in to 4,900 students in % of Central ward families are enrolled in charter schools Vision: Accelerate achievement and double- down on good facilities Accelerate progress at Cleveland, Quitman, South 17th, Harriet Tubman, 14th Avenue, Camden, and Franklin Invest in one Renew school: Flagg Redesign two schools: o Roberto Clemente o McKinley Allow proven a charter school to a manage district K-8: o Newton * ECERS: Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale. ECERS is an assessment of early childhood program environments and focuses on “process quality,” which is more highly predictive of outcomes than structural indicators. ECERS is scored on a 1 to 7 scale, with 7 representing the ideal

22 22 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Central Ward, continued Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Create attractive and diverse options for all students Grow Bard to scale at Camden Middle Accelerate progress at Science Park, American History, Arts High School, Central High School, Technology, Barringer STEAM Academy, and Barringer Arts and Humanities Academy High School: Magnets attract the highest-performing students leaving the comprehensives with heavy concentrations of higher need students 14% of ninth grade students entered high school in not proficient, over-age, or both Seven NPS high schools will be underutilized by Facilities: It will cost over $430M to bring all Central ward buildings up to 21st century standards and over $310M to district standards Vision: Implement a plan for every building that supports economic stability Invest in $220M NPS schools Work with high performing charter operators o North Star Academy at MLK o People’s Prep at Camden Middle o Paulo Freire at Burnet Street Divest Warren, Mary Wheeler Willis, Newton, and Newark Vocational Retain State Street, Barringer 9, Berliner, and Morton for district use To be determined: 200 Washington

23 23 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only North Ward Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Continue progress at ECC sites Accelerate progress at district standalone sites Early Childhood: 15 district classrooms across 10 locations District and provider sites in the North ward have satisfactory ECERS scores* * ECERS: Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale. ECERS is an assessment of early childhood program environments and focuses on “process quality,” which is more highly predictive of outcomes than structural indicators. ECERS is scored on a 1 to 7 scale, with 7 representing the ideal Vision: Accelerate achievement Accelerate progress at Elliot Street, Ridge Street, First Avenue, Park, and Branch Brook Redesign Abington Avenue Invest in two Renew schools o Rafael Hernandez o Luis Munoz Marin K-8s: 3 out of 8 district K-8 schools in the North ward are classified as low quality Facilities: It will cost over $160M to bring all North ward buildings up to 21 st century standards Vision: Accelerate building and renovations in the North Ward Invest in $58M NPS schools Elliot Street slated to break ground in 2016

24 24 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only East Ward Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Continue progress at ECC sites Accelerate progress at district standalone sites Early Childhood: 15 district classrooms across 6 locations District and provider sites in the East ward have satisfactory ECERS scores* * ECERS: Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale. ECERS is an assessment of early childhood program environments and focuses on “process quality,” which is more highly predictive of outcomes than structural indicators. ECERS is scored on a 1 to 7 scale, with 7 representing the ideal Vision: Accelerate achievement Accelerate progress at South Street, Wilson Avenue, Lafayette Street, Oliver Street, and Ann Street Invest in one Renew school: Hawkins Street K-8s: 1 out of 6 district K-8 schools in the East ward is classified as low quality

25 25 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only East Ward, continued Current ChallengesOur Future Facilities: It will cost over $180M to bring all East ward buildings up to 21 st century standards East Side High School, built in 1912, is the East ward’s newest building and the only one constructed in the 20 th century Vision: Accelerate building and renovations in the East Ward Invest in $90M NPS schools Oliver Street slated to break ground in 2017 Vision: Create attractive and diverse options for all students Accelerate progress at East Side High School High School: Magnets attract the highest-performing students leaving the comprehensives with heavy concentrations of higher need students 14% of ninth grade students entered high school in not proficient, over-age, or both Seven NPS high schools will be underutilized by 16-17

26 26 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only High Schools Current ChallengesOur Future Vision: Create attractive and diverse options for all students Accelerate progress at East Side High School, University High School, Science Park, American History, Central High School, Technology, Barringer STEAM Academy, Arts High School, and Barringer Arts and Humanities Academy Revive Weequahic o Eagle Academy at Weequahic o Girls Academy at Weequahic Continue to review Shabazz o Open Transfer School A at Shabazz o Continue to redesign Shabazz as athletic academies Revive West Side o Open Transfer School B at West Side o Resite Newark Early College to West Side Campus Grow Bard to scale at Camden Middle Create credit recovery options at Transfer Schools A and B and at all existing high schools Close Newark Evening Launch redesign process for NLA, Bridges, and Newark Vocational Magnets attract the highest-performing students leaving the comprehensives with heavy concentrations of higher need students 14% of ninth grade students entered high school in not proficient, over-age, or both Seven NPS high schools will be underutilized by

27 27 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Key Accomplishments from 2011 – 2013 Goal 1: Ensure that all students are college ready BeforeNow Programs and services were incoherent and disconnected. NPS has a coherent academic plan centered on the Common Core Standards. Low-level tests measured only basic skills. More challenging tests require students to explain in writing what they have read. The special education program focused on compliance and tended to segregate students into separate schools and programs. NPS has a district wide commitment to integrate all but the most severely disabled students into their home schools and help them meet the Common Core standards. After-school programs did not focus on academics. Twenty-one pilot schools, with others to follow, provide an extra hour of high-quality after-school instruction.

28 28 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Key Accomplishments from 2011 – 2013 Goal 2: Develop effective professionals in every classroom BeforeNow Teachers were rewarded financially for degrees earned, not their work with students. Teachers get bonuses based on their effectiveness in the classroom. Evaluations weren’t conducted on time or consistent across schools. All teachers get annual evaluations; peer evaluators and oversight committees ensure fairness and accountability; evaluation system is continuously improved based on lessons learned. Evaluations were based on unclear expectations. Evaluations are based on a new framework that sets clear expectations about what good teaching and learning looks like. Professional development was not strategic or targeted to teacher needs. Teachers get targeted support and coaching around instruction and key district initiatives, such as the shift to the Common Core. Teachers worked in a rigid top-down environment. Teachers have more flexibility; if a simple majority at a school votes to waive a contract rule, they can do so.

29 29 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Key Accomplishments from 2011 – 2013 Goal 3: Cultivate transformational school leaders BeforeNow Focus was on compliance with rules. Focus is on innovation to meet student and school needs. The central office set school budgets and placed staff. Principals have autonomy over budgets and hiring. Evaluations were based on unclear expectations. Evaluations are based on four clearly defined core competencies that align with district needs. Professional development was disconnected from evaluations. Principals receive targeted support and coaching around instruction, professional development, and giving feedback to teachers. There was no pipeline for promoting effective educators. The Emerging Leaders Program helps talented teachers become vice principals and principals.

30 30 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Key Accomplishments from 2011 – 2013 Goal 4: Engage and involve stakeholders BeforeNow Efforts were scattered among offices. The new Office of Family and Community Engagement coordinates the work. Focus was on publications. There is more focus on face to face: parent liaisons and coordinators. Information on student and school performance was outdated, hard to find. Parents can access real-time data on their students and school through parent web portal and data dashboard. Community involvement was not focused on district/school priorities. Parents and community members have multiple opportunities for focused involvement. Limited data focused mainly on test scores. Multiple measures of performance provide meaningful, transparent, and more readily available to all.

31 31 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Key Accomplishments from 2011 – 2013 Goal 5: Provide the right mix of schools BeforeNow Schools stayed open regardless of persistent under-enrollment and under-performance. The district has consolidated schools, closing some and opening some based on community and student input and needs. District schools and public charters operated entirely independently of each other, to the disservice of children. Schools share resources, space, innovations, ideas, and professional development. The high school application process was disorganized and fractured, with families having to apply to each school individually. A universal application system eases the burden on families, expands choice for students, and ensures equitable access for all families. Older students with few credits were transferred around the system, pushed out of schools, and given extremely limited support in comprehensive schools. NPS expanded support in comprehensive schools for students who are far behind; reorganized three alternative schools; created a re-engagement center to focus on students at a transfer point, such as those who dropped out and returned. Schools stayed open regardless of persistent under-enrollment and under-performance. The district has consolidated schools, closing some and opening some based on community and student input and needs.

32 32 Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only Key Accomplishments from 2011 – 2013 Goal 6: Transform and streamline central office BeforeNow The district’s organizational structure was centered on outdated, ineffective regional offices. Assistant superintendent teams are focused on coaching and supporting principals. Central office set school budgets and placed staff. Principals have much more autonomy over budgets and hiring. No office focused on serving families. Created Office of Community and Family Engagement led by a senior staff member. Outdated human resources office focused on processing paperwork. New Talent Office is focused on recruiting and retaining effective educators and school leaders. The paper filing system was ineffective and inefficient. Digital filing system has streamlined, accelerated and improved data collection.


Download ppt "Newark Public Schools January 2014 Successes to Date and One Newark Confidential – Draft in Process – For Internal NPS Use Only."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google