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Massachusetts Department of Education EDUCATOR DATABASE Informational Sessions Overview: September 2005 Web:

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Presentation on theme: "Massachusetts Department of Education EDUCATOR DATABASE Informational Sessions Overview: September 2005 Web:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Massachusetts Department of Education EDUCATOR DATABASE Informational Sessions Overview: September 2005 Web:

2 DOE STRATEGIC PLAN Goals 1.High quality academic content and performance standards are the basis for instruction and evaluation of student performance in all public schools. 2.Educators have the knowledge and skills to deliver effective instruction and create the conditions for students to succeed. 3.Schools provide safe and healthy learning environments. 4.Districts and schools have the resources and organizational capacity needed to meet state and federal requirements and to deliver education effectively and efficiently. 5.Effective practices and research-based strategies guide school and district improvement initiatives. 6.The Department’s capacity is expanded through strategic alliances with others who share our mission. 7.The Department is a high performance workplace where every staff member contributes to the achievement of our mission.

3 DOE STRATEGIC PLAN Educator Quality Goal 2 Educators have the knowledge and skills to deliver effective instruction and create the conditions for students to succeed. Objectives –Attract a diverse pool of talented candidates to careers in education. –Ensure appropriate high standards for educator preparation. –Promote and support working conditions and professional practices that retain effective educators. –Strengthen teaching and educational leadership through high quality professional development that is research-based and data driven.

4 Why this Data Collection? Strengthen our ability to use quality data to inform policy and program improvement. –Anticipate district employment needs –Identify priorities for continuous improvement –Identify what works Meet specific reporting requests already being made by state and federal government (including NCLB requirements), the media, and the public.

5 The Current Educator Workforce There are approximately 116,000 Educators –74,000 Teachers 6,000 Math Teachers 5,000 Science Teachers 12,000 Special Education Teachers –325 Superintendents/Charter School Leaders –1,800 Principals * source: October District and School Staffing Report, full time equivalence

6 The Educator Pipeline: Licensure DOE issues approximately 17,000 educator licenses annually. YTD in 2005: –1,468 Mathematics Licenses – 425 as first license –1,009 Science Licenses (All Fields) – 300 as first license –983 Special Education Licenses – 250 as first license –944 Principal / Assistant Principal Licenses – 20 as first license

7 The Educator Pipeline: Preparation Approximately 4,000 candidates for educator licensure completed approved educator preparation programs from 7/03 – 6/04. Of these completers: –103 completed programs in Mathematics –123 completed programs in the Sciences –300 completed programs for moderate disabilities –271 completed programs for principals

8 Educators: Demand vs. Supply According to a review of the ages of educators currently paying into the Massachusetts Teacher Retirement Board, an estimated 25% will retire over the coming five years.

9 Major Challenges To close the information gap between educator licensure and employment. To plan for a sufficient supply of highly qualified educators for each role and venue. To better understand which educator preparation and professional development programs and investments yield the best results. To ensure that ALL students are proficient or above.

10 2004/2005 MCAS Reading/ELA: Percent Proficient & Advanced, All Students Need to improve percentage points over the next 10 years. About 3-4 percentage points a year.

11 2004/2005 MCAS Mathematics: Percent Proficient & Advanced, All Students Need to improve percentage points over the next 10 years. About 4-6 percentage points a year.

12 Opportunities Teachers can access and analyze their own students’ data. Principals and teachers can analyze what’s working and identify where they can best leverage increased student achievement. Data, rather than anecdotes and assertion, can guide policy and decision making.

13 Completing the Picture We currently, separately collect: –Licensure data via “ELAR” (the state’s information on who is licensed for what – without any connection to who’s actually working) –District/School Staffing Report (DSSR – counts of educational personnel working in our schools by the roles they fulfill) This disconnected approach to collecting data leaves many important questions unanswered.

14 What Additional Information Will the DOE Collect? All information to be collected is a matter of public record. The information collected will be specific to educator employment and qualifications. The Department will consult extensively with districts and stakeholders in determining which data will be collected. Information will be collected from all school districts (including charter schools)

15 Data Elements Under Consideration Demographic Data: –ID (not SSN) –Name –Date of Birth –Gender –Race/Ethnicity

16 Educational & Employment Background: –Degrees –Degree Subjects –Total Years of Experience –District Code –Status –Date of Hire –Grant Funded Salary Source (State v Federal) –Grant Funded Salary Source (Specific Grant) Data Elements Under Consideration

17 Assignment Data: –School Code –Position / Role –Full-Time Equivalent –Grade(s) –Subject Area NCLB Highly Qualified Data: –Participating high quality professional development (Y/N) –Instructional paraprofessional qualifications –Method for demonstrating subject matter competency (for purposes of meeting federal "highly qualified" designation).

18 How Will the DOE Collect These Data? Secure web based data collection 2 methods of collecting data through the security portal: –File Upload (similar to SIMS) –On-line data entry Will replace the District / School Staffing Report (DSSR) DOE will hire additional Data Collection Support Specialists (formerly Field Techs) to assist districts in this collection.

19 District/Stakeholders Participation District feedback through a questionnaire A pilot group of approximately 30 districts Meetings with professional associations

20 What Will Be Accomplished and When? Phase 1 (11/05 – 12/06) –Educator IDs assigned –On-line system built and tested in collaboration with pilot districts –Data submitted by pilot group in October 2006 –Link to licensure database by December 2006 Phase 2 (1/07 – 12/07) –Training and support for all districts starting Jan –Statewide roll out of ID assignment and data collection in October 2007

21 WEB:

22 So… Let’s talk…


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