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Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 4 Topic : Concurrent Engineering Segment A Topic: Design of a Concurrent Engineering.

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Presentation on theme: "Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 4 Topic : Concurrent Engineering Segment A Topic: Design of a Concurrent Engineering."— Presentation transcript:

1 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 4 Topic : Concurrent Engineering Segment A Topic: Design of a Concurrent Engineering Process

2 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 2 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems ADVANCED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS DESIGN Concurrent Engineering Design of a Concurrent Engineering Process

3 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 3 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Overview Basic Design ProcessBasic Design Process –Audit and Assess –Develop Goals, Methods –Implement, Reassess, Modify Keys to Concurrent EngineeringKeys to Concurrent Engineering Difficulties in Concurrent EngineeringDifficulties in Concurrent Engineering

4 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 4 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Design of a Concurrent Engineering Process (1) NO DIFFERENT THAN OTHER DESIGN!NO DIFFERENT THAN OTHER DESIGN! –Audit –Design Alternatives –Evaluate –Select –Implement –Monitor and Re-Assess

5 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 5 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Design of a Concurrent Engineering Process (2) AuditAudit –Skills –Attitudes –Physical and Organizational Infrastructure –Support Systems (Training and Informational) –Reward Structures –Managerial Infrastructure

6 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 6 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Three Phases of Audit Identify Influencing Dimensions and Levels (Product and External)Identify Influencing Dimensions and Levels (Product and External) Identify Concurrent Engineering Elements and Levels (Internal)Identify Concurrent Engineering Elements and Levels (Internal) EvaluationEvaluation –[Source: Singh, Systems Approach to Computer Integrated Design and Manufacturing, p ]

7 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 7 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Identify Influencing Dimensions and Levels (1) Product ComplexityProduct Complexity Product TechnologyProduct Technology Number of ComponentsNumber of Components Number of (sub) Disciplines NeededNumber of (sub) Disciplines Needed Independence of Sub-systemsIndependence of Sub-systems Maturity/State of ArtMaturity/State of Art –Product –Production Processes –Application

8 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 8 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Identify Influencing Dimensions and Levels (2) Program StructureProgram Structure Program FuturesProgram Futures CompetitionCompetition Number of Organizations/Units/”Bosses”Number of Organizations/Units/”Bosses” Number People/DisciplinesNumber People/Disciplines Criticality to Core Business/ SurvivabilityCriticality to Core Business/ Survivability Ability/Desire to React/ImpactAbility/Desire to React/Impact

9 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 9 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Identify Influencing Dimensions and Levels (3) Business RelationshipsBusiness Relationships Team ScopeTeam Scope ResourcesResources How Closely Tied (Virtual Enterprises, Supply Chain, Shared Information)How Closely Tied (Virtual Enterprises, Supply Chain, Shared Information) Number of Perspectives and Degree of Life Cycle ConsideredNumber of Perspectives and Degree of Life Cycle Considered Availability, Limits, Competing ProjectsAvailability, Limits, Competing Projects

10 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 10 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Identify Influencing Dimensions and Levels (4) Corporate CultureCorporate Culture ScheduleSchedule Willingness to Work Together, Share InformationWillingness to Work Together, Share Information Available/Allowable Lead TimeAvailable/Allowable Lead Time

11 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 11 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Identify Concurrent Engineering Elements/Levels (1) OrganizationalOrganizational Requirements and GoalsRequirements and Goals ConstraintsConstraints Corporate Culture, Dynamics, Relative Power, Management StyleCorporate Culture, Dynamics, Relative Power, Management Style Known, Agreed To, Completeness, QuantifiedKnown, Agreed To, Completeness, Quantified Known, RealKnown, Real

12 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 12 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Identify Concurrent Engineering Elements/Levels (2) CommunicationCommunication Style (Formal and Informal)Style (Formal and Informal) Common “Standards”Common “Standards” –Processing –Storage –Accessibility –Terms and Units –Language –Method EquityEquity

13 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 13 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Identify Concurrent Engineering Elements/Levels (3) Design/ Development MethodologyDesign/ Development Methodology Cognizance of Final CustomerCognizance of Final Customer ProcessProcess –Ideation –Assessment –Selection –Development/Improvement MeasuresMeasures

14 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 14 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Post-Audit Evaluation Assess/Document Current StateAssess/Document Current State –Rate on “Behaviorally Anchored” Scale –Cite Experiences not Perceptions –Use Structured Assessment Delphi Method Structured Approaches Compare to Desired/Needed StateCompare to Desired/Needed State

15 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 15 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Design of a Concurrent Engineering Process (3) Develop Alternatives/RequirementsDevelop Alternatives/Requirements –Same Manager (Project Team vs. Matrix) Differing Agendas and Pressures –Persistence (Project vs. Permanent) Social Comfort vs. New Blood –Organizational Culture/Socialization Clash of Attitudes –Co-Location/Isolation from Discipline Peers Contribution vs. Technical Competency/Specialization

16 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 16 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Design of a Concurrent Engineering Process (4) EvaluateEvaluate –Technical Feasibility Adequacy of Design Skills and Support Systems Information Exchange Mechanisms –Economic Feasibility Cost to Change/Train/Relocate/Reorganize Benefits –Operational Feasibility Employee Attitudes Managerial Support

17 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 17 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Keys to Concurrent Engineering Process Process Must Fit OrganizationProcess Must Fit Organization –Culture –Location/Connectiveness Must Fit ProductsMust Fit Products –Final Arbiter Is Correct Personnel Must Accept Process, RolePersonnel Must Accept Process, Role Communication Tools Available, UseableCommunication Tools Available, Useable –Electronic and Interpersonal

18 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 18 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Difficulties in Concurrent Engineering Process (1) Balancing and Sequencing WorkloadsBalancing and Sequencing Workloads –Skills and Tasks, Personnel –Over Time, Multiple Projects –Iterative Nature of Process Mapping to Life CycleMapping to Life Cycle –Life Cycle Views –Availability of “Experts” –Balancing of Different Life Stages/Consideratons

19 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 19 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Difficulties in Concurrent Engineering Process (2) Discipline “Egos”Discipline “Egos” –Lack of Mutual Appreciation/Respect –Lack of Appreciation of Own Limitations –Final Arbiter/Power Politics –Loss of Customer Perspective Data Exchange ProblemsData Exchange Problems –Data Equals Power –Lack of Harmonization and Interoperability

20 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 20 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Data Exchange Problems in Concurrent Engineering Exchange Between PeopleExchange Between People Exchange Between CAD SystemsExchange Between CAD Systems –Precision –Representation Exchange Between CAD Models and Analysis ModelsExchange Between CAD Models and Analysis Models No Capture of Logic of DesignNo Capture of Logic of Design Differences in Discipline “Jargon”Differences in Discipline “Jargon”

21 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 4 Topic : Concurrent Engineering S egment A Topic: Design of a Concurrent Engineering Process END OF SEGMENT

22 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 4 Topic : Concurrent Engineering Segment B Topic: Techniques and Alternate Methods I

23 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 23 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems ADVANCED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS DESIGN Concurrent Engineering Techniques and Alternative Methods I

24 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 24 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Overview Concurrent Engineering TechniquesConcurrent Engineering Techniques –Conceptual/Procedural –Computer Assisted/Executed

25 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 25 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Conceptual/Procedural Quality Function DeploymentQuality Function Deployment Failure Mode and Effect AnalysisFailure Mode and Effect Analysis Value EngineeringValue Engineering –Design for Manufacturability –Design for Assembly Variance ReductionVariance Reduction –Group Technology –Computer Aided Process Planning

26 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 26 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Quality Function Deployment (From Sullivan, 1986) GoalGoal –Identify and Enumerate Customer Requirements and Translate these Customer Requirements into Technical Requirements Four PhasesFour Phases –Product Planning –Part Deployment –Process Deployment –Production Deployment

27 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 27 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Product Planning (1) Identify Requirements in Customer TermsIdentify Requirements in Customer Terms Identify and List Product Characteristics and FeaturesIdentify and List Product Characteristics and Features Define Relationships Between Customer Requirements and Final Product Characteristics and Features Define Relationships Between Customer Requirements and Final Product Characteristics and Features

28 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 28 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (1) Customer RequirementsCustomer Requirements –Durable Stain Resistant Wrinkle Resistant –Pleasing Colorful/Matches Shows Personality Impresses Observers –Low Cost Purchase Life Cycle (Per Wearing/Use)

29 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 29 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (2) Thread Material Stitch Used Thread Finish Cloth Finish Durable Stain Resist.  Wrinkle Resist.  Come Apart Cost Initial Buy 

30 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 30 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Product Planning (2) Enter Market EvaluationsEnter Market Evaluations –Relative Importance of Customer Requirements –Presence/Absence of Customer Requirements in Competitor’s Product Evaluate Product Characteristics and Features of CompetitorsEvaluate Product Characteristics and Features of Competitors –Objectively Quantify to Extent Possible

31 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 31 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (3a) Thread Finish Cloth Finish Cust. Rating Compe- tition Durable Stain Resist. 108,6,4 Wrinkle Resist. 57,9,1 Come Apart 2018,15,9 Compet. Eval. ABC

32 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 32 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (3b) Thread Material Stitch Used Cust. Rating Compe- tition Durable Stain Resist. 108,6,4 Wrinkle Resist. 57,9,1 Come Apart 2018,15,9 Compet. Eval. ABC Target110100

33 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 33 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Product Planning (3) Establish Quantitative Targets for Your Product for Each Characteristic, and FunctionEstablish Quantitative Targets for Your Product for Each Characteristic, and Function –Use Same Objective Quantification Identify Selling Points (in Customer Terms) based on Comparison of Your Targets and Competitor’s Scores.Identify Selling Points (in Customer Terms) based on Comparison of Your Targets and Competitor’s Scores. Reevaluate/Finalize Product Characteristics, and FunctionsReevaluate/Finalize Product Characteristics, and Functions

34 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 34 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (4) Thread Material Cloth Finish Cust. Rating Compe- tition Selling Point Durable Stain Resist. 108,6,4 Top Mat’l/ Finish Wrinkle Resist. 57,9,1 Come Apart 2018,15,9 Best Stitch Compet. Eval. ABC Target110100

35 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 35 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (5) Thread Material Cloth Finish Cust. Rating Compe- tition Selling Point Durable Stain Resist. 108,6,4 Top Mat’l/ Finish Wrinkle Resist. 57,9,1 Come Apart 2018,15,9 Best Stitch Compet. Eval. ABC Target(Rev.)110120

36 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 36 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Part Deployment For Each Product Characteristic, and Function, Identify Sub-systems and Components that Provide the Desired Characteristics and FunctionsFor Each Product Characteristic, and Function, Identify Sub-systems and Components that Provide the Desired Characteristics and Functions Identify the Critical Characteristics of Each ComponentIdentify the Critical Characteristics of Each Component For each Component, Identify the Physical Requirements Needed to Provide Critical Component CharacteristicsFor each Component, Identify the Physical Requirements Needed to Provide Critical Component Characteristics

37 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 37 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (6) Stain Resistance Thread Material Cloth Finish Cust. Rating Compe- tition Selling Point Durable Stain Resist. 108,6,4 Top Mat’l/ Finish Wrinkle Resist. 57,9,1 Come Apart 2018,15,9 Best Stitch Compet. Eval. ABC Target(Rev.) Sub-sys. Com- ponent Component Characteristic Cloth Body Water Beading Liner Stiff, Inert w/Cloth Finish

38 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 38 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Process Deployment For Each Component, Identify the Processes Needed to Produce the Physical Requirements Needed in Each ComponentFor Each Component, Identify the Processes Needed to Produce the Physical Requirements Needed in Each Component Identify the Part and Process Parameters That Will Need to Be Monitored To Assure Quality (Customer Defined Translated to Technical Specs)Identify the Part and Process Parameters That Will Need to Be Monitored To Assure Quality (Customer Defined Translated to Technical Specs)

39 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 39 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (7a) Component Finished Component Characteristic Critical Component Part Charact. Liner Stiffness Thread Diameter, Spacing Inert Finish, Base Material Etc.

40 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 40 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Example (7b) Liner Critical Component Part Characteristics Process Monitoring Plan Process Stiff- ness InertEtc. Control Points Check Point Monitor Method Fre- quency Weave Tight- ness Weigh Light Meter X & R Hourly Coat Appl. Rate Flow Water Bead Hourly …

41 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 41 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems QFD – Production Deployment Complete Processing Instructions and Make ProductComplete Processing Instructions and Make Product

42 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Concurrent Engineering Discussion Topic: Techniques and Alternate Methods I

43 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 4 Topic : Concurrent Engineering Segment B Topic: Techniques and Alternate Methods II

44 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 44 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems ADVANCED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS DESIGN Concurrent Engineering Techniques and Alternative Methods II

45 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 45 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Overview Concurrent Engineering TechniquesConcurrent Engineering Techniques –Conceptual/Procedural –Computer Assisted/Executed

46 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 46 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Conceptual/Procedural Quality Function DeploymentQuality Function Deployment Failure Mode and Effect AnalysisFailure Mode and Effect Analysis Value EngineeringValue Engineering –Design for Manufacturability –Design for Assembly Variance ReductionVariance Reduction –Group Technology –Computer Aided Process Planning

47 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 47 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Failure Mode and Effect Analysis Identify all Failure ModesIdentify all Failure Modes –Component –Sub-Systems –System –System and User Forecast Effect of Each FailureForecast Effect of Each Failure –Impact on Product, Function Identify Probability of Event/ModeIdentify Probability of Event/Mode Identify Risk Reduction OptionsIdentify Risk Reduction Options

48 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 48 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Value Engineering For Each Component/Sub-Assembly/ AssemblyFor Each Component/Sub-Assembly/ Assembly –Can it be Redesigned to Reduce Manufacturing or Assembly Cost (DFM, DFA) Eliminate Reduce Simplify Combine Can it be Redesigned to Reduce Life Cycle (Maintenance) Costs

49 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 49 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Variance Reduction Exploit/Encourage SimilaritiesExploit/Encourage Similarities –Group Technology (Shape, …) Reuse Components Limit Materials Share Tooling –CAPP (Processing Sequence) Same Routing, Path Same Machines Same Tools Same Parameters

50 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 50 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Part Feature Recognition Attributed Adjacency Graph (AGG)Attributed Adjacency Graph (AGG) –MetaData about CAD Model –Must be Generated Outside of CAD System (Not a By-Product of “Design”) –Recognition May be Drawing Sequence Dependant –No Standard Nomenclature or Format (CAD to CAPP Exchange) Use of Surface Normals in AGG GenerationUse of Surface Normals in AGG Generation

51 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 51 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Group Technology (1) Basis for Any Retrieval SystemBasis for Any Retrieval System Problem of Classification and CodingProblem of Classification and Coding –Relevant (User’s Viewpoint) Permanent Attributes/Features Used for Classification and Coding –Pre-Design or Post Design Application –Coding Must Facilitate Retrieval Speed Relevance to Current Task Costs and BenefitsCosts and Benefits

52 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 52 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Group Technology (2) Tradeoff of Detail and Length of CodeTradeoff of Detail and Length of Code Cost of Coding Legacy PartsCost of Coding Legacy Parts Design and Process Data in CodeDesign and Process Data in Code Coding vs. Data in DatabaseCoding vs. Data in Database

53 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 53 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Computer Assisted/ Executed Methods CaxCax –Computer Aided Design/Drafting Part Model/Drawing –Computer Aided Engineering Analysis (CAD to FEM, Interference, Thermodynamic Analysis, Aerodynamic, … –Computer Assisted Process Planning Model to Part Feature Recognition (AGG) –Classification, Coding and Retrieval (GT) Capture, Store, and Retrieve Part Characteristics for Grouping

54 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 54 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Computer Assisted/ Executed Methods CaxCax –Computer Aided Manufacturing Numerical Control Robotics Scheduling Automatic Storage and Retrieval

55 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 55 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Computer Assisted/ Executed Methods Information TechnologiesInformation Technologies –Data Standards Data Exchange Data Harmonization Data Interoperability –Internet/Communication Networks Electronic Commerce Electronic Data Interchange

56 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Concurrent Engineering Discussion Topic: Techniques and Alternate Methods II


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