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Step by Step to Prevention Outcomes: Building a Coalition, Implementing Effective Programs and Paying for it All.

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Presentation on theme: "Step by Step to Prevention Outcomes: Building a Coalition, Implementing Effective Programs and Paying for it All."— Presentation transcript:

1 Step by Step to Prevention Outcomes: Building a Coalition, Implementing Effective Programs and Paying for it All

2 PRESENTED BY: Donna Herchek, Counseling Services of Lancaster Dr. Paul N. McKenzie, Southeast Center for Strategic Community Development; Heather R. Mueller, The Children's Council, Charlene McGriff, Palmetto Citizens Against Sexual Assault REPRESENTING: The Lancaster Prevention Coalition Lancaster, South Carolina

3 WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES  Background and History  Establishing and/or Strengthening your Coalition  Best Practice Programming  Paying the Bills

4 BACKGROUND AND HISTORY  Founded in 1998, Lancaster, SC  40 Public, Private, Civic, & Faith Based Entities, including: Law Enforcement School DistrictDept. of Social Services Higher Education Mental Health Dept. of Juvenile Justice Recreation DepartmentMediaNAACP Faith Community CBO’sDAODAS Parents YouthUnited Way

5 BACKGROUND AND HISTORY  8 th Year of DFCS  Over $20 million in prevention funding  Major Accomplishments: Programming in every school in community Longitudinal Reduction in Alcohol and Drug Use Rural Substance Abuse Prevention Conference Legislative Breakfast Annual Town Hall Meetings Cable Access TV Program Annual Community and Parent Assessments Telephone Poll

6 BACKGROUND AND HISTORY Guided by Strategic Prevention Framework Risk Factors Protective Factors Evidence Based Prevention Services Environmental Strategies

7 RISK FOCUSED PREVENTION MODEL WHY DO CERTAIN YOUTH ENGAGE IN RISKY BEHAVIORS SUCH AS:  DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE  DELINQUENCY  TEEN PREGNANCY  SCHOOL DROP OUT  VIOLENCE WHAT CAN BE DONE TO REDUCE THESE PROBLEM BEHAVIORS?

8 RISK FACTORS  According to the model, certain environmental variables that increases the likelihood that a youth will engage in one of the problem behaviors.  The more Risk Factors present in the life of a child, the greater likelihood that he/she will develop the problem behavior.  Nineteen (19) risk factors have been found predictive of the problem behaviors. These risk factors have been organized into four domains: Community Family School Individual/Peer

9 PROTECTIVE FACTORS  Other environmental variables that insulate youth from experiencing problem behaviors.  The more Protective Factors present in the life of a child, the less likely he/she will participate in a problem behavior.  It is the combination of RISK and PROTECTIVE FACTORS that help to predict whether a child will develop a problem behavior such as substance abuse, delinquency or dropping out.

10 In order to prevent these behaviors from occurring, interventions should therefore:  Reduce individual Risk Factors  Increase Protective Factors

11 CUT TO THE CHASE… HOW WE DID IT

12 THREE THINGS YOU MUST DO  PARTNERSHIP, A REAL ONE  DATA, AND LOTS OF IT  BEST PRACTICES, AND WELL RUN

13 STEP ONE: THE COALITION TOP TEN KEYS TO A PERFECT PARTNERSHIP

14 IT’S EASIER TO BUILD IT RIGHT AT THE START, THAN FIX IT LATER STEP ONE: THE COALITION

15 THE BEST WAY TO GET PEOPLE INVESTED IS TO PUT THEM TO WORK …IF YOU DON’T PLAN THE ACTIVITY, YOU BECOME THE ACTIVITY STEP ONE: THE COALITION

16 COLLABORATION IS MORE THAN SHARING INFORMATION STEP ONE: THE COALITION

17 NO PRE-CONCEPTIONS… FOLLOW “THE ROPE” STEP ONE: THE COALITION

18 DIVERSITY IS MORE THAN A CATCH-PHRASE STEP ONE: THE COALITION

19 IT’S A MARATHON, NOT A SPRINT STEP ONE: THE COALITION

20 WE ALL LOVE EACH OTHER… UNTIL MONEY IS ON THE TABLE STEP ONE: THE COALITION

21 WATCH OUT FOR THE “800 POUND GORILLAS” STEP ONE: THE COALITION

22 DATA IS KEY STEP ONE: THE COALITION

23 MOVE TO MAYBERRY STEP ONE: THE COALITION

24 WHAT DOES THE RESEARCH SAY ABOUT EFFECTIVE COALITIONS? STEP ONE: THE COALITION

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26 CHARACTERISTICS OF DFC PROJECTS:  Total Grants: 719  98% of DFC are using at least one environmental strategy to target substance abuse  Community Education/Raising Awareness 95%  Changing Institutional or Governmental Policies 29%  Increasing attention to Enforcement of Laws 36%

27 What Does an Effective Coalition Look Like?  N = 53  Are primarily in Rural areas (76%) compared to all reported coalitions (56%).  Have been established for an average of 5.7 years.  Are in communities with an average of 968 you in grades 9-12.

28 STEP TWO: THE DATA  Develop a Data Warehouse  Longitudinal is Optimal General Demographics PopulationEthnicityAge PovertyEmploymentAdult Education HousingTransitionDivorce Family Structure

29 Social Fabric CrimeCDVATOD RunawaysDiseaseFirearms Teen PregnancyDelinquencyHealth STEP TWO: THE DATA

30 Education AchievementAttendanceExpulsions SuspensionsDropoutRetentions ESLLunch StatusCollege Attendance Reading Patterns STEP TWO: THE DATA

31 DATA SOURCES ARCHIVAL DATA  Kids Count  Census.gov  PSK12.com  National Center for Education Statistics  Fedstats.gov

32 LOCAL OR STATE ARCHIVES  Department of Education  Health Department  AODAS  Department of Social Services  Department of Juvenile Justice  City/County  Governor's Office DATA SOURCES

33 SURVEY DATA Adapt an Existing Survey Protocol Monitoring the Future Pride Survey CSAP Risk and Protective Survey Communities that Care

34 SURVEY DATA Develop Your Own Survey Draft a Template Review Field Test Revise DATA SOURCES

35 LIKERT SCALE RESPONSES Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree VS.

36 SURVEY INTEGRITY Reported 30 Day vs. Lifetime Use Comparability with Other Datasets “L-Scale” Tabulation Accuracy: Opscan Optical Mark Reader Survey Tracker Audience Response System

37 RESOURCE DATA SERVICES TypeHistoryDosage CapacityStaffingFunding EvaluationPartnersGaps IntakeResearchResources TARGET POPULATION AgeGender Ethnicity Geography

38 ACTING ON THE DATA  PRIORITIZE NEEDS AND GAPS  DETERMINE TARGET POPULATION  TARGET UNDERSERVED AREAS  GEOGRAPHICAL ACCESS Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

39 BEST PRACTICE PROGRAMS DATA TARGET POPUATION STRATEGIES Cultural Competence Gender Developmental Status Geographical Location BUILDING YOUR OWN VS. IMPLEMENTING AN EXISTING MODEL

40 FINDING PROGRAMS  National Registry of Effective Prevention Programs (NREPP)  SAMHSA Model Programs  Department of Justice  Department of Education  National Governor’s Association  FamilyStrengthening.org  Helping America’s Youth

41 EXAMPLES: FAMILY BASED  FAST: Families and Schools Together  Strengthening Families  Creating Lasting Family Connections  Making Parenting a Pleasure  Effective Black Parenting  Los Ninos Bien Educados  Confident Parenting  Parenting Wisely  Raising a Thinking Child  Parent – Child Home Program

42 EXAMPLES: YOUTH BASED  Positive Action  Towards No Drug Abuse  Class Action  Life Skills Training  Mentoring  All Stars  Project Alert

43 EXAMPLES: SYSTEM BASED  Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol  Brief Strategic Therapy

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45 PAYING FOR IT ALL THINK ABOUT RAISING MONEY… YOU HAVE ONE DOLLAR. YOU MUST DONATE IT ALL. DIVIDE IT ANY WAY YOU LIKE. HERE ARE THE ‘GRANT APPLICATIONS’

46 GRANT DEVELOPMENT

47 IDENTIFYING FUNDING  Local  State  Foundation  Federal

48 IDENTIFYING FUNDING INTERNET Web Sites Keyword Search MAILING LISTS Foundations State Departments Federal Departments

49 DEVELOP THE PROJECT DOCUMENT THE NEED Use local data Establish the “Greased Rails” Perspective Include the “Consumer Perspective” Identify Community Resources Articulate “Gaps”

50 BUILD THE CASE FOR PROGRAM Link program to Identified Needs Identify Best Practices Underscore Scientific Merit of Project

51 PARTNERSHIP Who else is Concerned about the Problem? Who could Benefit from the Collaboration? Who could have Problem with your Project?

52 CRAFTING THE PROPOSAL ABSTRACT Thorough, clear, detailed, compelling Last thing you usually write First thing that’s read by reviewer

53 CRAFTING THE PROPOSAL Goals and Objectives: (WHO) Parents in the Los Ninos Program will (WILL DO WHAT) Evidence an increase in child management skills (BY HOW MUCH) (BY WHEN) Of 15% by the end of the first year (HOW WILL YOU KNOW?) as measured by the Moos Family Environment Scale

54 CRAFTING THE PROPOSAL PROGRAM OVERVIEW Most Important Section of Proposal DETAIL and RIGOR The WOW Factor!

55 DETERMINING NARRATIVE LENGTH Maximum Length: 25 Pages Review Criteria Pages Needs and Justification20 Points5 Goals and Objectives15 Points3.75 Program Design30 Points7.5 Project Personnel10 Points2.5 Management Plan10 Points2.5 Evaluation15 Points2.5 Total:100 Points25

56 CRAFTING THE PROPOSAL Background of Grantee Sell Yourself and Organization Don’t be Modest DO NOW: 1-2 Paragraphs on Agency 1-2 Paragraphs on Programs 1 Paragraph on Each Key Staff

57 CRAFTING THE PROPOSAL Evaluation Process (Did you do what you said you would?) Outcome (What impact did it have?) Knowledge Attitudes Behavior

58 KEYS TO A WINNING PROPOSAL  Follow Directions in RFP  Be Creative and Innovative  Focus on Rigor (Who does What, to Whom, When, Where, How, and Why?)  Proofread the Proposal  Have a stranger read it.  Submit to more than one source.  Research the funding source  Submit Locally First  Be Aware of Timing of Funding  Don’t be Afraid to Think BIG

59 AESTHETICS OF GRANTWRITING  Use of fonts and formats  Use of margins  Text Boxes  Tables and Charts  Page Orientation

60 TOP 10 REASONS THAT A GRANT IS NOT FUNDED 1.Lack of Detail 2.Lack of Clear Logic Model 3.Poor Evaluation 4.All Components are not Addressed 5.Budget (too much, too little, or it doesn’t match the narrative)

61 TOP 10 REASONS THAT A GRANT IS NOT FUNDED 6.Goals and Objectives not Measurable 7.Lack of Justification for Program 8.Background of Staff is Inadequate 9.Letters or Support or Commitment 10.Boring or Unimaginative

62 THE KEY IS PERSISTENCE

63 OTHER FUNDRAISING THOUGHTS Fundraising Events NO, NO, NO, NO and NO! Time Consuming The “Non-Event” Better idea: Just Ask for Money

64 IDENTIFYING WEALTH Members Make an Outreach List Dun and Bradstreet List Foundation Listserve and Database

65 CONTACT INFO Paul N. McKenzie, Ph.D. Southeast Center for Strategic Community Development 961 Main Street Suite 296 Lancaster SC (803) Donna Herchek, Assistant Director Counseling Services of Lancaster PO Box 1627 Lancaster SC (803)

66 CONTACT INFO Charlene McGriff, Executive Director Palmetto Citizens Against Sexual Assault 106 N. York Street Lancaster SC (803) Heather R. Mueller, Executive Director The Children’s Council PO Box 171 Lancaster SC (803)

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