Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Best Practices in the Board Room, and Using Metrics Effectively July 18, 2014 Steve Katsouros, S.J. Director, Institute for Catholic Educational Leadership.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Best Practices in the Board Room, and Using Metrics Effectively July 18, 2014 Steve Katsouros, S.J. Director, Institute for Catholic Educational Leadership."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Best Practices in the Board Room, and Using Metrics Effectively July 18, 2014 Steve Katsouros, S.J. Director, Institute for Catholic Educational Leadership

3 WHY?

4 Micromanagement  Lack of staff  Loss of confidence in the CEO  The board’s committee structure mirrors management’s lines of responsibility, which draws board members into those areas  The board meets too often; in order to have something to do, board members delve into operations Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

5 Micromanagement (con’t)  Some board members feel more comfortable managing than governing  Board members are recruited for their business and managerial skills, and they want to use them  Board members feel a sense of accomplishment from managing Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

6 Micromanagement “Sometimes the reason for micromanagement actually rests with the CEO; this occurs when he or she invites the board into “downstream” management or operational issues, withholds information so that the board feels compelled to pry into details and operations, or shows an inability to effectively lead the organization.” Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

7 LANIER AND JOHNSON (2013)  Board Assessment at every single meeting.  Did we use our time well?  Did we stay strategic?

8 LANIER AND JOHNSON (2013) Every three to five years, all the trustees are asked, “How are we performing as a collective? How is the entire board functioning?”

9 “Task of the Executive Committee Annually.” Trower (2012) “The only legitimate reason to create and use an EC is to help the full board do its job.” Light (2004)

10 The Six Competencies of Effective Boards (Chait, Holland, & Taylor) Contextual: The board understands and takes into account the culture and norms of the organization it governs. Educational: The board takes the necessary steps to ensure that members are well-informed about the organization, the profession and the board’s roles, responsibilities and performance. Interpersonal: The board nurtures the development of its members as a group, attends to the board’s collective welfare, and fosters a sense of cohesiveness. Analytical: The board recognizes complexities and subtleties in the issues it faces, and draws upon multiple perspectives to dissect complex problems and to synthesize appropriate responses. Political: The board accepts as one of its primary responsibilities the need to develop and maintain healthy relationships among key constituencies. Strategic: The board helps envision and shape future direction and helps ensure a strategic approach to the organization’s future.

11 Competency 1: Contextual Dimension The board understands and takes into account the culture and norms of the organization it governs. The board: -Adapts to the characteristics and culture of the school’s environment. -Relies on the institution’s mission, values, and traditions as a guide for decisions. -Acts so as to exemplify and reinforce the organization’s core values.

12 CONTEXTUAL DIMENSION Sample Item: “Orientation programs for new board members specifically include a segment about the organization’s history and traditions.”

13 Competency 2: Educational Dimension The board takes the steps to ensure that trustees are well- informed about the institution, the profession, and the board’s roles, responsibilities and performance. The board: -Creates opportunities for trustee education and development. -Regularly seeks information and feedback on its own performance. -Pauses periodically for self-reflection, to diagnose its strengths and limitations and to examine its mistakes.

14 EDUCATIONAL DIMENSION Sample Item: “At least once every two years, our board has a retreat or special session to examine our performance, how well we are doing as a board.”

15 Competency 3: Interpersonal Dimension The board nurtures the development of the trustees as a group, attends to the board’s collective welfare, and fosters a sense of cohesiveness. The board: -Creates a sense of inclusiveness among the trustees. -Develops group goals and recognizes group achievements. -Identifies and cultivates leadership within the board.

16 INTERPERSONAL DIMENSION Sample Item: “I have had conversations with other members of this board regarding common interests we share outside this organization.”

17 Competency 4: Analytical Dimension The board recognizes complexities and subtleties in the issues it faces and draws upon multiple perspectives to dissect problems and to synthesize appropriate responses. The board: -Approaches problems from a broad institutional outlook. -Searches widely for concrete information and actively seeks different viewpoints from multiple constituencies. -Tolerates ambiguity and recognizes that complex matters rarely yield to perfect solutions.

18 ANALYTICAL DIMENSION Sample Item: “Our board explicitly examines the ‘downside’ or possible pitfalls of any important decision it is about to make.”

19 Competency 5: Political Dimension The board accepts as one of its primary responsibilities the need to develop and maintain healthy relationships among key constituencies. The board: -Respects the integrity of the governance process and the legitimate roles and responsibilities of other stakeholders. -Consults often and communicates directly with key constituencies. -Attempts to minimize conflict and win/lose situations.

20 POLITICAL DIMENSION Sample Item: “This board communicates its decisions to all those who are affected by them.”

21 Competency 6: Strategic Dimension The board helps envision and shape institutional direction and helps ensure a strategic approach to the organization’s future. The board: -Cultivates and concentrates on processes that sharpen institutional priorities. -Directs its attention to priorities and decisions of strategic or symbolic magnitude to the institution. -Anticipates potential problems and acts before issues become urgent.

22 STRATEGIC DIMENSION Sample Item: “This board is more involved in trying to put out fires than in preparing for the future.”

23  The Board Self Assessment Questionnaire (BSAQ) AVERAGES reflect board member’s PERCEPTIONS  The higher the averages, the better the board thinks it meets the characteristics of each competency

24 Secondary Ed BSAQ 2014 Secondary Means (n = 54) 2013 Secondary Means (n = 26) 2012 Participant Means (n = 38) 2008 Katsouros Means (n = 34) Holland Means (n = 300) Contextual.74.73.68 Educational.54.53 Interpersonal.68.66.63 Analytical.67.66.61 Political.68.67.68.64 Strategic.68.69.68.65

25 The Six Competencies of Effective Boards (Chait, Holland, & Taylor) Competency 1: Contextual Dimension: The board understands and takes into account the culture and norms of the organization it governs.

26 Competency #1: The Contextual Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Contextual Competency? Organization should include an explicit introduction to organizational values, norms and traditions. Invite emeriti staff, board members, and administrators, and “living legends” to convey the institution’s history. Review the organization’s hallmark characteristics and bedrock values that set the organization apart from its competitors. Resocialize board members to the board’s role and the organization’s values through brief readings, a pledge, or sharing anecdotes.

27 Questions Frequently Asked by Board Members About What to Expect from Board Service Part I:FAQ 1. Board Member Selection What personal attributes do we seek in prospective board members? What expertise and experience do we seek? What is the nomination and election process? How may I recommend possible candidates? 2. Board Organization and Structure What is the board’s committee structure? How are committee assignments made? Can non-board members serve on board committees? Who names committee chairs? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

28 Questions Frequently Asked by Board Members About What to Expect from Board Service Part I:FAQ 2. Board Organization and Structure (con’t) What attributes do we seek in the board chair? Is there an executive committee? If so, what does it do? Do we ever use task forces or ad hoc groups? 3. Past, Present, and Future Challenges What were the most important decisions that the board has made in the last few years? What are the most important decisions on the horizon? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

29 Questions Frequently Asked by Board Members About What to Expect from Board Service Part I:FAQ 4. Board Meetings Logistics/Operations If I am unable to attend a meeting, should I let someone know? Whom should I contact if I want to be updated on a meeting I missed? How often do the board and committees meet? Who, besides board members, attends our meetings? Are our meetings open to the press? How may I suggest agenda items for committee or board meetings? Do we meet in the executive session with the CEO? Without the CEO? What are the ground rules for the sessions? Is there a dress code for meetings? Are there assigned seats? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

30 Questions Frequently Asked by Board Members About What to Expect from Board Service Part I:FAQ 5.Other Matters What are the expectations for giving? Am I expected to help with fundraising? Is there an orientation process for new board members? Is there a ”board buddy” or “mentor” assigned to new board members? Is there a conflict of interest policy in place for board members? What expectations do we have about personal giving? Are board members expected to help identify and cultivate development prospects? What process do we use to evaluate the CEO? Do we participate in the evaluation of any other senior officers? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

31 Questions Frequently Asked by Board Members About What to Expect from Board Service Part II. Mutual Expectations 1.Inside the Boardroom Are there attendance requirements? Is it acceptable to arrive late or leave early? Is everything confidential? How do I raise or discuss sensitive issues? What should I do if I disagree with a committee or management recommendation? How do I balance a constructive partnership with a culture of accountability? What happens if there is a split vote on the board? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

32 Questions Frequently Asked by Board Members About What to Expect from Board Service Part II. Mutual Expectations 1.Inside the Boardroom (con’t) Should I keep quiet in meetings for the first year or two? Are there discussion guidelines? (for example, how often I can speak, expressing disagreement, calling for a vote) Are there other points of etiquette? (for example, may I check my PDA? Cell phone? Have sidebar conversations?) How can I best prepare for board and committee meetings? Do we evaluate the board’s performance? Individual board members? If so, how often? What do we do with the results? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

33 Questions Frequently Asked by Board Members About What to Expect from Board Service Part II. Mutual Expectations 2. Outside the Boardroom Can I contact the CEO directly? Can I contact senior management directly for information or to offer suggestions? What should I do if I am approached by the press, or other constituent representatives with questions or requests for information? What do I do with grapevine information or gossip? Are board members expected to attend functions in addition to board and committee meetings? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

34 An orientation should: (1) help new board members understand the board’s norms and preferred protocol of behavior (2) explain how the board really works (3) illustrate that there are no secrets or forbidden questions (Chait, Holland and Taylor 1996,74) Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

35 A careful, explicit, and thorough review of the board’s norms, rules of engagement, and characteristics and behaviors of effective board members for this board. A brief history of major changes the board has made in recent years in the way it does business and why those changes were made. Discussion of recent decisions that best illustrate core values of the organization-the values that may currently be under stress with issues on the horizon-and the processes the board uses to discern the issues on which to focus, and how the board discusses them, and how it makes decisions. If the board utilizes a Web portal, orientation should include a lesson on its use. Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass New Board Member Orientation

36 A glossary of terms and sector acronyms. Background briefing on upcoming deliberations so new board members are informed and ready to participate. Briefing on how the board evaluates itself and its members with an eye to team play, group dynamics, board member engagement, and board effectiveness. Some time with the new member’s mentor. It is especially important to provide a mentor or board “buddy” for a board member’s first year who can help answer questions and privately explain things that happen in the boardroom which might be unclear to a newcomer. Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass New Board Member Orientation (con’t)

37 The Six Competencies of Effective Boards (Chait, Holland, & Taylor) Competency 2: Educational Dimension: The board takes the necessary steps to ensure that members are well-informed about the organization, the profession and the board’s roles, responsibilities and performance..

38 Competency #2: The Educational Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Educational Competency? Set aside time at each board meeting for a “seminar” to learn about an important matter of substance or process or to discuss a common reading. Conduct extended 24-48 hour retreats every year or two for the same purpose and to analyze the board’s mistakes. Ask board members or senior staff to report briefly on the best idea they heard at a recent conference meeting. Meet periodically with “role counterparts” from comparable institutions. Rotate committee assignments. Have an annual “pop quiz.”.

39 Competency #2: The Educational Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Educational Competency? Establish internal feedback mechanisms by: 1.Requesting comments at the end of each meeting either by going around the room or submitting suggestions on an index card. 2.Collecting “critical incidents” to discuss at a retreat. 3.Conducting an annual survey of board members on their individual and the board’s collective performance. 4.Enlarging the role of the nominating committee to include monitoring the board’s performance and overall health.

40 More than satisfactory SatisfactoryLess than satisfactory Degree to which meeting successfully addressed strategic issues Quality and significance of discussions Time allotment for discussions Information provided in advance Overall effectiveness of meeting Meeting Evaluation Form * *2013, Strengthening the Board through the Governance Committee, AGB National Conference of Trusteeship, Washington, DC

41 Meeting Evaluation Form * *2013, Strengthening the Board through the Governance Committee, AGB National Conference of Trusteeship, Washington, DC What issues or topics would you like to see addressed at future meetings? Other suggestions or comments to improve board or committee meetings: If you would like to provide personal feedback on the board meetings, please fee free to write boardchair@internet.com Thank you for serving on the Board of Trustees and participating in these meetings and events.

42 Strongly Agree AgreeDisagreeStrongly Disagree I understand what is expected of me as a board member. I am reasonably well-informed about the organization. I am reasonably well-informed about trends affecting the organization. I have received feedback on my performance as a board member. I serve on a committee(s) that makes use of my talents. I understand the organization’s mission. I understand the board’s mission. Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Individual Board Member Performance Self-Assessment

43 Strongly Agree AgreeDisagreeStrongly Disagree I participate fully at board meetings. I give to the organization in accordance with expectations. I usually leave board meetings feeling it was important for me to be there. I have a good working relationship with the CEO. I have a good working relationship with the board chair. I understand how I can take on greater leadership responsibilities (for example chair a board committee or task force). Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Individual Board Member Performance Self-Assessment (con’t)

44 Individual Board Member Performance Self-Assessment  You have many commitments, perhaps including volunteering on other boards. Why are you on this board?  What do you find most fulfilling about serving on this board?  What do you find most frustrating about serving on this board?  Are there specific ways we could make better use of your time and talents? Please describe. Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

45 The Six Competencies of Effective Boards (Chait, Holland, & Taylor) Competency 3: Interpersonal Dimension: The board nurtures the development of its members as a group, attends to the board’s collective welfare, and fosters a sense of cohesiveness.

46 Competency #3: The Interpersonal Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Interpersonal Competency? 1: Create a sense of inclusiveness: Organize events that enable board members to become better acquainted with one another socially and personally. Produce an annual notebook with up-to-date biographical sketches of each member. Build some “slack time” for informal interaction. Share information and communicate regularly.

47 Characteristics Differentiating Boards from Other Teams Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Typical TeamsBoards as Teams Affiliation Members work for the same organization. Outside directors may be members of more than one board; this is not their “day job.” Interaction Members spend considerable time together; experience intense personal interaction. Directors spend little time together, making it difficult for them to build working relationships. Time and information Constantly immersed in company’s business. Limited time available to devote to mastering issues of complex company. Leaders as members Most members are not accustomed to sitting at the head of the table. Majority of members may be CEOs who are used to leading, not following.

48 Characteristics Differentiating Boards from Other Teams (con’t) Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Typical TeamsBoards as Teams Authority relationships Members’ roles on the team often reflect their status in the company. Lines of authority complex and unclear; chairmen/CEO both lead and report to boards. Changing expectations Usually created with reasonably clear charter- such as completing project- in mind. Difficult to achieve consensus in a climate of unprecedented scrutiny and pressure. Formality High degree of formality is rare generally reflects the culture of the company. Physical setting and social rituals reinforce aura of power and privilege. Meeting focus Work of teams continues between meetings. Little time devoted to board’s work between meetings.

49 Competency #3: The Interpersonal Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Interpersonal Competency? 2. Communicate group norms: Be sure that everyone understands the unwritten, unspoken “Rules of the Game.” Pair newcomers with a mentor or coach. Cultivate the notion of the board as a group by establishing and publicizing group goals for the board. Systematically groom the board’s future leaders. 3. Ensure that the group has adequate leadership: Develop a “farm system.” Use member “growth contracts.”

50 The Six Competencies of Effective Boards (Chait, Holland, & Taylor) Competency 4: Analytical Dimension: The board recognizes complexities and subtleties in the issues it faces, and draws upon multiple perspectives to dissect complex problems and to synthesize appropriate responses.

51 Competency #4: The Analytical Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Analytical Competency? Foster “cognitive complexity” by using multiple frames to analyze issues and events. Seek concrete and even contradictory information on ambiguous matters. Ask a few members to be critical evaluators or devil’s advocates, explore the downside of recommendations and the worst case scenarios. Develop contingency plans. Ask members to assume the perspective of key constituencies by role playing. Brainstorm, silently or openly. Consult outsiders, seek “dissensus.” Reinforce and reward constructive criticism.

52 Board Team Assessment Survey Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass ItemStrongly Agree AgreeDisagreeStrongly Disagree Meeting goals were explicitly stated. Board members were respectful of one another. Dissent was encouraged. Board members listened carefully to one another. Board members were open to different viewpoints. There was ample dialogue between board members.

53 Board Team Assessment Survey (con’t) Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass ItemStrongly Agree AgreeDisagreeStrongly Disagree There was good give-and-take with senior staff members/executives. There was widespread participation. No one exercised undue influence. The atmosphere was collegial. No one was marginalized.

54 Board Team Assessment Survey (con’t)  On a scale of 1 to 9, where 9 is best, how do you rate our overall performance as a team today?  Were there any major infractions of group norms?  If so, were the infractions explicitly addressed? Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

55 The Six Competencies of Effective Boards (Chait, Holland, & Taylor) Competency 5: Political Dimension: The board accepts as one of its primary responsibilities the need to develop and maintain healthy relationships among key constituencies.

56 Competency #5: The Political Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Political Competency? Broaden channels of communication: Distribute an annual board report and board agenda. Invite staff and consumers to serve on board committees. Invite staff to address the board periodically. Visit staff in their “natural habitats.” Establish multi-constituency task forces.

57 Competency #5: The Political Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Political Competency? The CEO should be instrumental in developing, maintaining, and refining the processes that enable trustees to communicate and consult directly with stakeholders. Monitor the health of relationships and morale within the organization. Keep options open and avoid win/lose situations. Be sensitive to the legitimate roles and responsibilities of stakeholders and to the integrity of the governance process. Distribute annually a profile of board members.

58 The Six Competencies of Effective Boards (Chait, Holland, & Taylor) Competency 6: Strategic Dimension: The board helps envision and shape future direction and helps ensure a strategic approach to the organization’s future.

59 Competency #6: The Strategic Dimension How do you Strengthen a Board’s Strategic Competency? Focus on the board’s attention on strategic issues: Request that the CEO develop an annual memorandum of strategy. Establish priorities, work plan, and a “continuous agenda” for the board and its committees based on the CEO’s memorandum.

60 Strategic Planning to Strategic Thinking Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Strategic Planning QuestionsStrategic Thinking Questions Do we have the money, space, and personnel? Is the business model viable? Does this plan build on our strengths? Are we a victim of our virtues? What is the size of the market?Are there new, unexplored markets? What is?What could be?

61 Strategic Planning to Strategic Thinking (con’t) Trower, C.(2013). The Practitioner’s Guide to Governance as Leadership: Building High Performing Nonprofit Boards. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Strategic Planning QuestionsStrategic Thinking Questions Are the assumptions valid?Should we consider making new rules? Can we predict the future?Do we understand the past? What are our internal preferences? What is the customer’s value proposition? What work does management have for committees to do? What is the most important work the board must organize to do?

62 Metrics? Why?* Simply because measuring is a large part (not the only part) of knowing:  Where we have been  Where we are  Therefore, where we are going *2013, Using Metrics Effectively, AGB National Conference of Trusteeship, Washington, DC

63 Why create a dashboard? Why Key Performance Indicators?  Undergirds any strategic or tactical plan. Your strategic plan has to be data-based.  Knowing your KPIs dramatically contributes to the board’s understanding of their fiduciary responsibilities.  Accreditation groups are looking for your KPIs.  KPIs create goals and benchmarking. Trustees see their institution’s history and set expectations.

64 Why create a dashboard? Why Key Performance Indicators?  Transparency-we are sharing and educating our constituency groups. Otherwise vacuums are filled with “magical narratives.” Data dissipate rumors.  KPIs are useful for both presidential/principal (CEO) and board self-assessments.  The board recognizes the institution’s place on the food chain.  KPIs create context and give a sense of where you are at this point of your narrative.

65 A Few Guidelines for Boards * 1Monitor your metrics over time 2Determine peer institutions at the institutional level 3Never use cohort or benchmark data to make your institution more like your competitors 4Have confidence in the numbers 5Strike a balance between too many metrics and too few -Robert A. Sevier *2013, Using Metrics Effectively, AGB National Conference of Trusteeship, Washington, DC

66 KPI for Secondary Education Boards Name of Institution___________________________________ Location _____________________________________________ Number of students_______________ Key Performance Indicators (all for fiscal year 2012-2013) 1.How many students applied for admission into your class of 2017?___________________________ 2.How many applicants did you accept?__________________________ 3.How many students enrolled?__________________________ 4. What percentage of students enrolled in 2012-2013 who did not re-enroll for 2013-2014?_______________ 5. What percentage of faculty and staff working at your school in 2012-2013 did not return for 2013-2014? __________ 6. What percentage of your solicitable alumni made financial contributions to your school? ________________ 7. What percentage of parents of current students made financial contributions to your school? _____________ 8. What is your median full-time faculty cash salary? _________

67 KPI for Secondary Education Boards (con’t) 9. What was your percentage of tuition increase from 2012-2013 to 2013-2014? __________________ 10. What percentage of your students receives financial aid and/or scholarship? __________________ 11.What is the ratio of students to faculty at your school? ________________________ 12.What is the ratio of students to total staff at your school? _____________________ 13. What was your endowment fund balance on June 30 th, 2013? ___________________ 14.What percentage of your budget is dedicated to faculty development? _________________ 15.What percentage of your budget is dedicated to technology (include salaries of your IT staff?) _____________ 16.What percentage of your students matriculated into a 4-year college or university after graduating from your school in 2013? _________________ 17.What percentage of your students matriculated into a 2-year college after graduating from your school in 2013?____________ 18.What was your school’s total operating expense for the 2012-2013 school year? _______________

68 Secondary Ed KPI 2012-2013 Secondary Means (n = 44) 2011-2012 Secondary Means (n = 30) 2010-2011 Secondary Means (n = 35) 2007-2008 Katsouros Means (n = 34) Total Students 811738859-- % Apps Accepted 80%79%73%72% % Who Enroll 72%65%61%78% % Student Attrition 4.9%3.9%4.7%3.5% % Faculty Attrition 6.4%6.8%4.7%7.7%

69 Secondary Ed KPI 2012-2013 Secondary Means (n = 44) 2011-2012 Secondary Means (n = 30) 2010-2011 Secondary Means (n = 35) 2007-2008 Katsouros Means (n = 34) % Alumni Donors 11%13%14%19% % Parent Donors 42%51%39%47% Median Salary $56,400$58,400-- % Tuition Increase 4.1%4.0%4.2%6.4% % Students With Aid 38%36%34%30%

70 Secondary Ed KPI 2012-2013 Secondary Means (n = 44) 2011-2012 Secondary Means (n = 30) 2010-2011 Secondary Means (n = 35) 2007-2008 Katsouros Means (n = 34) Students per Faculty 13.512.512.313.9 Students per Faculty & Staff 8.99.47.2-- Endowment Balance $10.5 M$10.8 M$12.9 M$18.5 M % Budget to Faculty Development 1.0%0.9%0.8%0.6% % Budget to Technology 3.8%4.3%2.8%

71 Secondary Ed KPI 2012-2013 Secondary Means (n = 44) 2011-2012 Secondary Means (n = 30) 2010-2011 Secondary Means (n = 35) 2007-2008 Katsouros Means (n = 34) %Students Who Enroll in 4-Yr Colleges 89%94%84%97% %Students Who Enroll in 2-Yr Colleges 9%5%6%-- Operating Expenses $12.0 M$13.2 M$12.8 M-- Per-Student Expenditure $14,700$18,000$14,400-- Operation to Endowment 4.74.40.8--

72 Nativity Miguel Schools KPI Nativity Means (n = 7) Total Students92 % Apps Accepted60% % Who Enroll96% % Student Attrition5.7% % Faculty Attrition12.0%

73 Nativity Miguel Schools KPI Nativity Means (n = 7) Median Salary$49,700 % Students With Reduced Lunch 83% % Revenue from Parents4% % Revenue from Charitable or Government Donations 75% % Revenue from Grants--

74 Nativity Miguel Schools KPI Nativity Means (n = 7) Students per Faculty8.2 Students per Staff5.7 Endowment Balance$1.3 M % Budget to Faculty Development 1.5% % Budget to Technology3.0%

75 Nativity Miguel Schools KPI Nativity Means (n = 7) %Students Who Matriculated to 4-Year Colleges 64% %Students Who Matriculated to 2-Year Colleges 18% Operating Expenses$1.8 M Per-Student Expenditure$19,000 Operation to Endowment2.1

76 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional KPI 2012-2013 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional (n=5) Total Students324 % Apps Accepted69% % Who Enroll80% % Student Attrition14.3% % Faculty Attrition9.5%

77 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional KPI 2012-2013 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional (n=5) % Alumni Donors-- % Parent Donors-- Median Salary$45,500 % Tuition Increase0.6% % Students With Aid 83%

78 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional KPI 2012-2013 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional (n=5) Students per Faculty14.1 Students per Faculty & Staff7.5 Endowment Balance$5.3 M % Budget to Faculty Development 0.9% % Budget to Technology2.8%

79 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional KPI 2012-2013 Cristo Rey & Non-Traditional (n=5) %Students Who Enroll in 4-Year Colleges 61% %Students Who Enroll in 2-Year Colleges 34% Operating Expenses $4.6 M Per-Student Expenditure $15,100 Operation to Endowment 0.9

80 Robert Reich: ROI versus Public Good The KPIs with the public dimension  How many financial aid recipients are in our school? How many are graduating?  Compare affirmative action for legacies vs. affirmative action for students from low income backgrounds.  Graduates who were students from modest means: Where are they? Are they in college? Are they working? Where?

81 Best Practices in the Board Room, and Using Metrics Effectively July 18, 2014 Steve Katsouros, S.J. Director, Institute for Catholic Educational Leadership


Download ppt "Best Practices in the Board Room, and Using Metrics Effectively July 18, 2014 Steve Katsouros, S.J. Director, Institute for Catholic Educational Leadership."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google