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MIS: Chapter 14 Cumulative concepts, features and functions, plus new functions COUNTIFS, SUMIFS, AVERAGEIFS (Separate ppt on REACH.louisville.edu) All.

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Presentation on theme: "MIS: Chapter 14 Cumulative concepts, features and functions, plus new functions COUNTIFS, SUMIFS, AVERAGEIFS (Separate ppt on REACH.louisville.edu) All."— Presentation transcript:

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2 MIS: Chapter 14 Cumulative concepts, features and functions, plus new functions COUNTIFS, SUMIFS, AVERAGEIFS (Separate ppt on REACH.louisville.edu) All assigned course Homework and Lab Assignments

3 Lookup Functions VLOOKUP HLOOKUP INDEX-MATCH Text Functions FIND LEFT LEN RIGHT MID UPPER LOWER PROPER TRIM CONCATENATE Database Functions DAVERAGE DCOUNT DMAX DMIN DSUM

4 FIND =FIND(find_text,within_text,[start_num]) LEFT =LEFT(text,[num_chars]) LEN =LEN(text) RIGHT =RIGHT(text,[num_chars]) UPPER =UPPER(text) LOWER =LOWER(text) PROPER =PROPER(text) CONCATENATECONCATENATE ((including &) =CONCATENATE(text1, [text2],...)

5 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =FIND(find_text,within_text,[start_num]) Arguments: find_text Required  The text you want to find. within_text Required  The text string containing the text you want to find. start_num Optional  Specifies the character at which to start the search.

6 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Locates one text string within a second text string, and returns the number of the starting position of the first text string from the first character of the second text string Remarks: FIND always counts each character. The first character in within_text is character number 1. If you omit start_num, it is assumed to be 1. FIND is case sensitive. If find_text is "" (empty text), FIND matches the first character in the search string (that is, the character numbered start_num or 1).

7 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Errors: #VALUE! – If find_text does not appear in within_text #VALUE! – If start_num is not greater than zero #VALUE! – If start_num is greater than the length of within_text

8 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 11Miriam McGovern =FIND(“M”,A11) =1

9 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 11Miriam McGovern =FIND(“M”,A11,3) =8

10 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 11Miriam McGovern =FIND(“m”,A11) =6

11 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =LEFT(text,[num_chars]) Arguments: text Required  The text string that contains the characters you want to extract. num_chars Optional  Specifies the number of characters you want LEFT to extract.

12 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Returns the first character or characters in a text string, based on the number of characters you specify Remarks: LEFT always counts each character. Num_chars must be => 0.

13 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Sale Price =LEFT(A2,4) =Sale

14 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Sale Price 3Sweden =LEFT(A3) =S

15 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =LEN(text) Arguments: text Required  The text whose length you want to find.

16 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Returns the number of characters in a text string. Remarks: Spaces count as characters.

17 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Phoenix, AZ One =LEN(A2) =11

18 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Phoenix, AZ One =LEN(A4) =0

19 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Phoenix, AZ One =LEN(A6) =8

20 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =RIGHT(text,[num_chars]) Arguments: text Required  The text string that contains the characters you want to extract. num_chars Optional  Specifies the number of characters you want RIGHT to extract.

21 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Returns the last character or characters in a text string, based on the number of characters you specify. Remarks: RIGHT always counts each character. Num_chars must be => 0.

22 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Sale Price 3 4Stock Number =RIGHT(A2,5) =Price

23 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Sale Price 3 4Stock Number =RIGHT(A2,LEN(A2)-FIND(“ “,A2)) =RIGHT(A2,10-5) =RIGHT(A2,5) =Price

24 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions A 1Data 2Sale Price 3 4Stock Number =RIGHT(A4) =r

25 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =MID(text,start_num,num_chars) Arguments: text Required  The text string that contains the characters you want to extract. start_num Required  Specifies the number of character you want to start extracting from. text Required  Specifies the number of characters you want to extract.

26 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =MID(A1,11,6) =string =MID(A3,4,2) =is

27 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =UPPER(text) Arguments: text Required  The text you want converted to uppercase.

28 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Converts text to uppercase. Remarks: Text can be a reference or text string.

29 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =UPPER(A2) =TOTAL

30 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =UPPER(A3) =YIELD

31 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =LOWER(text) Arguments: text Required  The text you want converted to lowercase.

32 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Converts all uppercase letters in a text string to lowercase. Remarks: LOWER does not change characters in text that are not letters.

33 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =LOWER(A2) =e.e. cummings

34 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =LOWER(A3) =apt. 2b

35 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =PROPER(text) Arguments: text Required  Text enclosed in quotation marks, a formula that returns text, or a reference to a cell containing the text you want to partially capitalize.

36 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Capitalizes the first letter in a text string and any other letters in text that follow any character other than a letter. Remarks: PROPER converts all other letters to lowercase letters.

37 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =PROPER(A2) =This Is A Title

38 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =PROPER(A3) =2-Cent’S Worth

39 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =PROPER(A4) =76Budget

40 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =TRIM(text) Arguments: text Required  text is the text value to remove the leading and trailing spaces from.

41 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions =TRIM(A1) =“Tech on the Net” =TRIM(A2) =“1234”

42 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Syntax: =CONCATENATE(text1, [text2],...) Arguments: text1 Required  The first text item to be concatenated. text2 Optional  Additional text items, up to a maximum of 255 items, which must be separated by commas.

43 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions Description: Joins up to 255 text strings into one text string. Remarks: The joined items can be text, numbers, cell references, or a combination of those items.

44 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions ABC 1Data 2Brook trout AndreasHauser 3speciesFourthPine 432 =CONCATENATE(“Stream Population for “,A2,” “,A3, “ is “,A4,”/mile”) =Stream Population for Brook trout species is 32/mile

45 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions ABC 1Data 2Brook trout AndreasHauser 3speciesFourthPine 432 =CONCATENATE(B2, “ “, C2) =Andreas Hauser

46 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions ABC 1Data 2Brook trout AndreasHauser 3speciesFourthPine 432 =CONCATENATE(C2, “, “, B2) =Hauser, Andreas

47 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions ABC 1Data 2Brook trout AndreasHauser 3speciesFourthPine 432 =CONCATENATE(B3, “ & “, C3) =Fourth & Pine

48 Microsoft ® Excel ® Text Functions ABC 1Data 2Brook trout AndreasHauser 3speciesFourthPine 432 =B3& “ & “ &C3 =Fourth & Pine

49 DAVERAGE =DAVERAGE(database,field,criteria) DCOUNT =DCOUNT(database,field,criteria) DMAX =DMAX(database,field,criteria) DMIN =DMIN(database,field,criteria) DSUM =DSUM(database,field,criteria)

50 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DMIN(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:B2) The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

51 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DMIN(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:B2) The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

52 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DMIN(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:B2) The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

53 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DMIN(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:B2) The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

54 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DMIN(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:B2) =75 The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

55 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DCOUNT(A4:E10,"Age",A1:F2) This function looks at the records of apple trees between a height of 10 and 16 and counts how many of the Age fields in those records contain numbers.

56 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DCOUNT(A4:E10,"Age",A1:F2) This function looks at the records of apple trees between a height of 10 and 16 and counts how many of the Age fields in those records contain numbers.

57 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DCOUNT(A4:E10,"Age",A1:F2) This function looks at the records of apple trees between a height of 10 and 16 and counts how many of the Age fields in those records contain numbers.

58 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DCOUNT(A4:E10,"Age",A1:F2) This function looks at the records of apple trees between a height of 10 and 16 and counts how many of the Age fields in those records contain numbers.

59 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DCOUNT(A4:E10,"Age",A1:F2) =1 This function looks at the records of apple trees between a height of 10 and 16 and counts how many of the Age fields in those records contain numbers.

60 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DSUM(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:A2) The total profit from apple trees.

61 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DSUM(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:A2) The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

62 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DSUM(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:A2) The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

63 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DSUM(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:A2) The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

64 Microsoft ® Excel ® Database Functions =DSUM(A4:E10,"Profit",A1:A2) =225 The minimum profit of apple trees over 10 in height.

65 VLOOKUP =VLOOKUP(lookup_value, table_array, col_index_num, [range_lookup]) INDEX =INDEX(array,row_num,[column_num]) MATCH =MATCH(lookup_value, lookup_array, [match_type])

66 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Syntax: =VLOOKUP(lookup_value,table_array,col_index_num,[range_lookup]) Arguments: lookup_value Required  The value to search in the first column of the table or range. table_array Required  The range of cells that contains the data. col_index_num Required  The column number in the table_array argument from which the matching value must be returned. range_lookup Optional  A logical value that specifies whether you want VLOOKUP to find an exact match or an approximate match.

67 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Description: Searches the first column of a range of cells, and then returns a value from any cell on the same row of the range. Remarks: The values in the first column of table_array can be text, numbers, or logical values. Uppercase and lowercase text are equivalent. If range_lookup is TRUE, the values in the first column of table_array must be placed in ascending order. If range_lookup is TRUE or omitted, an approximate match is returned. If range_lookup is FALSE, an exact match will be attempted.

68 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Errors: #VALUE! – If col_index_num is less than 1 #REF! – If col_index_num is greater than the number of columns in the table_array #N/A – If range_lookup is FALSE and an exact match cannot be found #N/A – If lookup_value is less than the smallest value in the first column of table_array

69 (1)=VLOOKUP(C11*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) (2)=VLOOKUP(IF(MIN(B6:F18)<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) (3)=VLOOKUP(MAX(B3:G4)*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) (4)=VLOOKUP(C3*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) (5)=VLOOKUP(LARGE(D10:G17,4), $C$8:$F$20, 5, FALSE)

70 (1)=VLOOKUP(C11*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE)

71 =VLOOKUP(44*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE)

72 (1)=VLOOKUP(C11*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(44*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE)

73 (1)=VLOOKUP(C11*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(44*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE)

74 (1)=VLOOKUP(C11*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(44*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, 66/E6, TRUE)

75 (1)=VLOOKUP(C11*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(44*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, 66/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, 66/11, TRUE)

76 (1)=VLOOKUP(C11*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(44*2, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, G18/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, 66/E6, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, 66/11, TRUE) =VLOOKUP(88, $B$8:$G$24, 6, TRUE)

77 (2) =VLOOKUP(IF(MIN(B6:F18)<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3)

78 =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3)

79 (2)=VLOOKUP(IF(MIN(B6:F18)<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>11, 38, 83), E11:G22,3)

80 (2)=VLOOKUP(IF(MIN(B6:F18)<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>11), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(FALSE, 38, 83), E11:G22,3)

81 (2)=VLOOKUP(IF(MIN(B6:F18)<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>11), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(FALSE, 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(83, E11:G22,3)

82 (2)=VLOOKUP(IF(MIN(B6:F18)<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>MAX(D3:G5), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(11<>11), 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(IF(FALSE, 38, 83), E11:G22,3) =VLOOKUP(83, E11:G22,3)

83 (3) =VLOOKUP(MAX(B3:G4)*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE)

84 =VLOOKUP(17*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE)

85 (3)=VLOOKUP(MAX(B3:G4)*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*18/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE)

86 (3)=VLOOKUP(MAX(B3:G4)*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*18/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(306/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE)

87 (3)=VLOOKUP(MAX(B3:G4)*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*18/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(306/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(306/6, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE)

88 (3)=VLOOKUP(MAX(B3:G4)*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*18/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(306/6, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(51, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE)

89 (3)=VLOOKUP(MAX(B3:G4)*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*B6/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(17*18/G3, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(306/6, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(51, $C$8:$F$20, 3, FALSE) #N/A

90 (4) =VLOOKUP(C3*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4))

91 =VLOOKUP(11*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4))

92 (4)=VLOOKUP(C3*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(11*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(11*5, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4))

93 (4)=VLOOKUP(C3*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(11*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(11*5, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(55, C8:F20, IF(1000>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4))

94 (4)=VLOOKUP(C3*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(11*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(11*5, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(55, C8:F20, IF(1000>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(55, C8:F20, IF(1000>924, 2, 4))

95 (4)=VLOOKUP(C3*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) … =VLOOKUP(55, C8:F20, IF(1000>924, 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(55, C8:F20, IF(TRUE, 2, 4)) =VLOOKUP(55, C8:F20, 2)

96 (4)=VLOOKUP(C3*E3, C8:F20, IF(SUM(B3:B24)>SUM(F3:F24), 2, 4)) … =VLOOKUP(55, C8:F20, 2)

97 (5)=VLOOKUP(LARGE(D10:G17,4), $C$8:$F$20, 5, FALSE)

98 =VLOOKUP(58, $C$8:$F$20, 5, FALSE)

99 (5)=VLOOKUP(LARGE(D10:G17,4), $C$8:$F$20, 5, FALSE) =VLOOKUP(58, $C$8:$F$20, 5, FALSE) #REF!

100 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Syntax: = HLOOKUP(lookup_value,table_array,row_index_num,range_lookup) Arguments: lookup_value Required  The value to search in the first row of the table or range. table_array Required  The range of cells that contains the data. row_index_num Required  The row number in table_array from which the matching value will be returned  range_lookup Optional  A logical value that specifies whether you want HLOOKUP to find an exact match or an approximate match.

101 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Description: Searches for a value in the top row of a table or an array of values, and then returns a value in the same column from a row you specify in the table or array. Remarks: If HLOOKUP can't find lookup_value, and range_lookup is TRUE, it uses the largest value that is less than lookup_value. If lookup_value is smaller than the smallest value in the first row of table_array, HLOOKUP returns the #N/A error value.

102 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Errors: #VALUE! – If row_index_num is less than 1 #REF! – If row_index_num is greater than the number of rows in the table_array #N/A – If range_lookup is FALSE and an exact match cannot be found #N/A – If lookup_value is less than the smallest value in the first row of table_array

103 ABC 1AxlesBearingBolts Formula Description (Result) Looks up Axles in row 1, and returns the value from row 2 that's in the same column. (4) =HLOOKUP("Axles",A1:C4,2,TRUE) =HLOOKUP("Bearings",A1:C4,3,FALSE) Looks up Bearings in row 1, and returns the value from row 3 that's in the same column. (7) =HLOOKUP("B",A1:C4,3,TRUE) Looks up B in row 1, and returns the value from row 3 that's in the same column. Because B is not an exact match, the next largest value that is less than B is used: Axles. (5) =HLOOKUP("Bolts",A1:C4,4) Looks up Bolts in row 1, and returns the value from row 4 that's in the same column. (11)

104 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Syntax: =INDEX(array,row_num,[column_num]) Arguments: array Required  A range of cells or an array constant. row_num Optional  Selects the row in array from which to return a value. o If row_num is omitted, column_num is required. column_num Optional  Selects the column in array from which to return a value. o If column_num is omitted, row_num is required.

105 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Description: Returns the value of an element in a table or an array, selected by the row and column number indexes. Remarks: If both the row_num and column_num arguments are used, INDEX returns the value in the cell at the intersection of row_num and column_num. Errors: #REF! – If row_num and column_num do not point to a cell within array

106 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Syntax: =MATCH(lookup_value, lookup_array, [match_type]) Arguments: lookup_value Required  The value that you want to match in lookup_array. lookup_array Required  The range of cells being searched. match_type Optional  Specifies how Excel matches lookup_value with values in lookup_array. o The number -1, 0, or 1

107 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions Description: Searches for a specified item in a range of cells, and then returns the relative position of that item in the range Remarks: The lookup_value argument can be a value (number, text, or logical value) or a cell reference to a number, text, or logical value. MATCH returns the position of the matched value within lookup_array, not the value itself. MATCH does not distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters when matching text values. Errors: #N/A – If MATCH is unsuccessful in finding a match

108 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions ValueBehaviorRestrictions 1 MATCH finds the largest value that is less than or equal to lookup_value. The values in the lookup_array argument must be placed in ascending order. 0 MATCH finds the first value that is exactly equal to lookup_value. None MATCH finds the smallest value that is greater than or equal to lookup_value. The values in the lookup_array argument must be placed in descending order. Default

109 Microsoft ® Excel ® Lookup Functions

110  Access creates databases ◦ Data is stored in various separate tables by subject or task ◦ The data is related and can be brought together in ways that you specify

111  _______ are the most important parts of a database.  ______ store your data in rows and columns. All databases contain one or more of these.  _______ retrieve and process your data. They can combine data from different tables, update your data, and perform calculations on your data.  _____ control data entry and data views. They provide visual cues that make data easier to work with.  _______ summarize and print your data. They turn the data in your tables and queries into documents for communicating ideas.

112  To distinguish one record from another, tables can contain a primary key field. ◦ The primary key is an identifier—such as a part number, a product code, or an employee ID—that's unique to each record. ◦ The primary key should be a piece of information that won't change frequently. ◦ When tables relate, the primary key of one table becomes a foreign key of the other table.


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