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Slide 1 Certificate of Achievement Cookery Schools 2 Incorporating unit standards: 167.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 1 Certificate of Achievement Cookery Schools 2 Incorporating unit standards: 167."— Presentation transcript:

1 slide 1 Certificate of Achievement Cookery Schools 2 Incorporating unit standards: 167

2 slide 2 NZQA Unit standard 167: Practise food safety methods in a food business

3 slide 3 The aim of food safety is: to prevent food poisoning, and to maintain the quality of food through all stages of production until it is eaten.

4 slide 4 Food spoilage is: when food has deteriorated to a point when it is no longer fit to eat, for example, it looks, tastes or smells undesirable. when people become ill from eating contaminated food. Unlike food spoilage, where there are obvious signs that a food item has deteriorated, you cannot always tell when food is contaminated and may cause food poisoning. any biological, chemical or physical substance that can cause harm if eaten. Food poisoning is: A food safety hazard is:

5 slide 5 Biological food safety hazards Chemical food safety hazards Physical food safety hazards

6 slide 6 What are the three rules of food safety? Protect against contamination Prevent growth Kill the bacteria.

7 slide 7 Answers to Activity 1 1. What is the aim of food safety? To prevent food poisoning and to maintain the quality of food through all stages of production until it is eaten. 2. What are the three rules of food safety? Protect against contamination Prevent growth Kill the bacteria.

8 slide 8 Contamination is: the presence of pathogenic (dangerous) unwanted substances or micro-organisms in food. the transfer of pathogenic micro-organisms from a contaminated source to uncontaminated food. Cross-contamination is:

9 slide 9 To control the growth of micro- organisms: you need to make the conditions unfavourable for growth. –Temperature – Keep food out of the danger zone. –Time – Only use food within the use-by date. –Food – Take care when handling and storing high-risk foods. –pH – Use acids such as vinegar to preserve foods. –Moisture – Place perishable food that you do not need to use in the next day or two into the freezer.

10 slide 10 Conditions for growth TIME FOOD MOISTUR E WARMT H

11 slide 11 Answers to Activity 2 1. Examples of physical hazards include: Slugs and hair 2. Examples of chemical hazards include: Insecticides and the green on potatoes 3. Examples of biological hazards include: Bacteria, yeasts and moulds. 4. Micro-organisms like the following types of foods: High risk

12 slide The danger zone is: 5-63°C 6. Bacteria can double in numbers every: 20 minutes. 7. Micro-organisms need: Moisture 8. The ideal pH range for bacteria to survive is: Neutral 9. To control micro-organism growth you need to make at least one of the conditions for growth unfavourable. True

13 slide 13 Answers to Activity 3 Food poisoning When people become ill from eating contaminated food Food spoilage When food has deteriorated to a point when it is no longer fit to eat, for example it looks, tastes or smells undesirable Food safety hazard Any biological, chemical or physical substance that has the ability to cause harm if eaten Contamination When food has become unsafe because unwanted substances or micro- organisms have entered it Cross-contamination The transfer of pathogenic (dangerous) micro-organisms from a contaminated source to uncontaminated food Micro-organism An organism that is microscopic, usually too small to be seen by the naked human eye

14 slide 14 Personal Hygiene HANDSAPRONSHAIR OPEN WOUNDS TASTINGILLNESS

15 slide 15 Handling Rubbish Food hygiene practices Handling Chemical s Handlin g Money Handling Raw Food

16 slide 16 Answers to activity 4 List at least five unhygienic activities that would require you to wash you hands when working with food. Visiting the toilet, smoking, nose blowing, handling rubbish, handling money, handling chemicals, handling raw food.

17 slide 17 Illness Colds and Flu Vomiting Diarrhoea Sinus infections Hepatitis A

18 slide 18 Answers to Activity 8 1. When you are working with food, any cut, sore or skin condition should be covered with a coloured waterproof dressing to prevent it coming into contact with food and contaminating it. 2. You should not go to work if you have: The flu

19 slide 19 Gloves: Need to be changed as frequently as you would wash your hands. They need to be treated in the same way as exposed hands, as they can cause cross- contamination if not changed between food groups or after any unhygienic activity.

20 slide 20 Answers to Activity 9 1. When using disposable gloves you should: Change them between different foods or any unhygienic activity 2. Paper towels are a good alternative to: All of the above. 3. To make sure tongs are safe for handling food they should be: Cleaned and sanitised between uses 4. When sampling food you should use: A clean spoon

21 slide 21 Cleaning means removing visible dirt and debris. Something that looks clean can still harbour dangerous bacteria that are invisible to the eye. Sanitising means removing bacteria that the eye cannot see and therefore reducing contamination. Sterilising is taking sanitising one step further and removing all bacteria. In a kitchen environment, this is usually done by exposing the item to boiling water or high temperatures for several minutes, such as in a commercial dishwasher.

22 slide 22 To make sure work areas and equipment are cleaned and sanitised correctly: Use correct cleaning procedures. Use the correct cleaning agent. Prepare cleaning agents according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

23 slide 23 Answers to Activity 12 List at least five different types of high-risk foods in the space below. All cooked meat and poultry Cooked meat products including gravy, stock, and roll/sandwich fillings Milk, cream, artificial cream, custards and dairy products Cooked eggs and products made with eggs (e.g. Mayonnaise) Shellfish and other seafood Cooked rice

24 slide 24 Answers to Activity 15 1.Which of the following are high-risk foods? Roast chicken, seafood salad, cream doughnut, ham and egg filled roll. All are high-risk foods. 2.If you open a new packet of dry goods, such as flour or cereal, what should you do? Answer similar to: Reseal the packet tightly or transfer the contents to a storage container. 3.Fridges and chillers should be at what temperature? 4  C or below. 4.Freezers should be at what temperature? -18˚C or below. 5.To avoid cross-contamination, how should raw meat, poultry or fish be stored in the fridge? Answer similar to: They should be well covered, on the bottom shelf of the fridge and away from other foods, especially cooked and ready-to-eat foods.

25 slide 25 6.Why is it important to wash fruit or vegetables that are going to be eaten raw? Answer similar to: They may have traces of chemicals such as pesticides or fertilisers on their skins. 7.Why is it dangerous to thaw frozen food on the kitchen bench? Answer similar to: The outside edges of the food, which thaw first, could be in the temperature Danger Zone, allowing bacteria to multiply while you wait for the inside to thaw. 8.How can you check if a piece of chicken is cooked right through? Answer similar to: You could use a meat thermometer or pierce it with a knife at the thickest point and check that any juices that run out are clear, not bloody. The internal temperature should be over 72  C. 9.Why is it important to cool cooked food quickly before refrigerating or freezing it? Answer similar to: To avoid the food sitting in the Danger Zone (5  - 63  C). 10.Name two (2) ways of cooling cooked food quickly. Two of the following: divide it into smaller portions, put it in a shallow container, stir it frequently.

26 slide 26 Remember the right temperatures for safe food: Hot food should be really hot; cold food should be kept really cold. The internal temperature of cooked food should reach 72  C or above. All hot foods must be held at a temperature of 63  C or above. Chilled and cold foods must be held at 4  C or below. Frozen foods must be held at -18  C or below. Remember the right temperatures for safe food:

27 slide 27 Answers to activity 16

28 slide 28 Answers to activity 17 Bacteria multiply best between 5 o C and 63 o C. At temperatures below 5 o C, most bacteria multiply very slowly. That’s why food that would normally ‘go off’ if left at room temperature can last for several days if kept in the fridge – the bacteria that spoil the food can only multiply very slowly at the low temperature. At -18 o C or below micro-organisms stop multiplying. Most do not die so they can start to multiply again if warm conditions return. Food should not be left in the Danger Zone for longer than 1 hour.

29 slide 29 Answers to activity How long did it take for the pie to reach a safe internal core temperature? Answers will vary depending on the microwave used and the temperature of the pies prior to heating. Candidate should be able to read the graph they have plotted and give an approximate time for when the pie reached safe internal temperature of 72°C. 2. What should you do to prevent cross-contamination when using your temperature probe? Clean and sanitise between uses. 3. At what temperature do bacteria grow best? Danger zone = 5-63°C 4. What could happen if you ate the pie before it reached a safe temperature? Possibility of getting food poisoning.

30 slide 30 Pests

31 slide 31 Answers to Activity What should a food handler always do after emptying a rubbish bin? Wash his or her hands. 1. Why should outside rubbish bins have well- fitting lids? Answer similar to: To keep out birds, insects and animals.


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