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Damaged Fuel Storage and Recovery A Case Study Natraj C. Iyer Savannah River National Laboratory June 2, 2010 May 31,- June 4, 2010, IAEA, Vienna, Austria.

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Presentation on theme: "Damaged Fuel Storage and Recovery A Case Study Natraj C. Iyer Savannah River National Laboratory June 2, 2010 May 31,- June 4, 2010, IAEA, Vienna, Austria."— Presentation transcript:

1 Damaged Fuel Storage and Recovery A Case Study Natraj C. Iyer Savannah River National Laboratory June 2, 2010 May 31,- June 4, 2010, IAEA, Vienna, Austria Co-Authors: D.L. Fisher, R.L. Thomas, J.E. Thomas, T.J. Spieker International Conference for Management of Spent Fuel from Nuclear Power Reactors

2 2 Outline Damaged Fuel Storage in Isolation Canisters Called “Oversize (OS) Canisters” Contents - Early Test Reactor Fuel Pieces and Damaged Fuel Fuel Direct-Stored or In Other Cans within the OS Canisters Special Underwater Filter/Deionizer for Damaged Fuel Recovery Remove Cesium from High Activity Water (up to 5.8E6 Bq/ml in 3800 liters) from Six OS Canisters (No Release Into General Basin Water) Special Design Apparatus for Underwater Remote Operation Operation Results OS Canister for L-Basin Damaged Fuel Storage Design Features Damaged Fuel Management at the Savannah River Site: - System to Store Damaged Fuel Underwater, Isolating It from General Basin; - System to Remove Water Activity from Oversize Canisters

3 3 Spent Fuel Storage Experience Storage of MTR and non-MTR Spent Fuels Stainless Steel, Zircaloy and Aluminum Clad Research Reactor Fuel Aluminum Clad – Depleted Uranium Targets Fuel Core (Meat): Depleted U, U- Aluminide, U-Sr Hydride, U- Silicide, U-Mo, UO 2 Enrichment: 20 to 93% Variety of SNF in Basin Storage Storage of Variety of Spent Fuels for >40+ Years Primary Basin Storage Facility in U.S. for DOE Spent Fuel

4 4 Damaged Fuel Storage Configuration in OS Canisters Fuel Pieces and Damaged Fuel Storage Tubes, tube sections, and pins For Example - Fuel irradiated in the site Heavy Water Components Test Reactor and site production reactors: Cladding: Zircaloy, Aluminum Fuel Core: U metal, UO 2 U-Zr, U-Al, U-Mo, U- Fe Place pieces in cans (Z-cans, B-cans) Oversize (OS) Canisters Al or SS Construction ~4m (14’) Long, 0.33m(~14”) Diameter J-Tube Vented Z-Can (#Z13) with Fuel Pieces OS Aluminum Canister

5 5 Deinventory of Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuel Savannah River Site RBOF Building L-BASIN Building Goal: RBOF De-Inventory by September 2006 – Completed September 2003 Completed MTR transfer March 2001 ~3800 Assemblies transferred starting Transfer goal was July 2001 Completed 1st Non-MTR transfer March 2001 De-inventory shipments included SFO, EBR-II (Oct-00), TRR (Feb- 98), Mk-42 (Oct-00), Mk-31 Completed OS Canister recovery and transfer September 2003

6 6 SRS Underwater Resin Deionizer Design Background Oversize (OS) Cans Contained Fuel Pieces Oversize (OS) Cans had High Activity Levels (5.8x10 6 Bq/ml) from Cs-137 Need to Open OS Cans to Re-Pack Fuel Without Releasing High Activity to Basin Underwater System Designed and Built to Provide Deionization of OS Cans Portable, Skid-Mounted System 28 liters CG8-H resin (strong acid cation resin) 100  m Filter - Sintered Stainless Steel Metal Filter 2 Independent Air Motors with Remote Operation Using Building Air Supply Attach/Detach Lines with Typical Basin Handling Tools Resin Can in Shroud Filter Air Motor Pump Flow Meter Discharge Port Inlet Port Hose to resin column Discharge Inlet

7 7 Operation to Flush Oversize (OS) Cans Inlet at Bottom of Can to Avoid Plugging by Debris in the OS Can Opened Flanged Connection on the OS Can Inlet Water from Basin Outlet Water to Basin Run for 1 Hour at 12 L/m

8 8 OS Flushing – Results ‘ Red-line ’ Underwater Deionizer in RBOF Air Motor Remote Controls OS Can RO7 Meter to Record Resin Column Activity at “Red Line” Underwater Water Activity Initial (OS Can A3): 120,000 Bq/ml Water Activity Final (OS Can A3): 1,700 Bq/ml after 1 hour single-pass flushing at 12 lpm through 3800 liter OS Can volume Performance Example

9 9 OS Flushing – Results Flushed A3, A1, A2, A6, A7 and A5 Cans Can NumberRO7 Initial Reading RO7 Final Reading Duration of Flush Contents A314 mR/hr1 mR/hr1 hour1 FEC A129 mR/hr1 mR/hr1 hour1 FEC A2410 mR/hr2 mR/hr1.5 hours1 FEC A6323 mR/hr4 mR/hr1.5 hours2 FECs A7290 mR/hr2 mR/hr2 hours2 ‘Z’ cans 1 4” can A52.4 R/hr10 mR/hr3 hours4 ‘Z’ cans 100 R = 1 Gy

10 10 OS Flushing – Results 6 OS cans flushed internal cans containing pieces/failed tubes (vented) primarily Zr cladding fuel age: 1958/62 irradiation 319 Ci Cs-137 captured 1 cu. Ft CG8-H resin 1 month total operation Findings 3 ruptured Z-cans 36 lbs. Oxide at bottom of 1 OS can 12 lbs. fines dispersed thru filter 6300 R/hr at red line final exposure rate

11 11 Failed ‘Z’ and ‘B’ Cans Within OS Canisters

12 12 Damaged Fuel Transferred to L-Basin Fuel with Through-Clad Breaches May be Acceptable for Continued Direct Basin Storage Evaluate Cs Release with Sip Test Evaluate Expected Continued Release Based on Corrosion Model Evaluate Capacity of Basin Deionization System Damaged Fuel in Cans Placed in New OS Canisters Oversize (OS) Canisters for L-Basin L-Basin OS Canister Rack

13 13 OS Canister Improved Design and L-Basin Storage OS Canister with Improved J-tube Isolates Enables Gas Release Fuel Direct-Stored or In Cans within OS Canisters 13 New OS Canisters Stored in L-Basin for Damaged Fuel 1 New OS Canister for Resin Column Latest J-tube Design on OS Canister

14 14 Summary Savannah River Site Experience in Underwater Storage of Severely Damaged Fuel Successful in Storage/Recovery/Repack Campaign Fuel Recovery from OS Cans Used Special Design Underwater Deionizer Damaged Fuel Management at the Savannah River Site: -System to Store Damaged Fuel Underwater: Vented Canister Storage with Isolation of Canister Water from General Basin Water; - System to Remove Water Activity from Oversize Canisters


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