Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Probabilistic sequence modeling I: frequency and profiles Haixu Tang School of Informatics.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Probabilistic sequence modeling I: frequency and profiles Haixu Tang School of Informatics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Probabilistic sequence modeling I: frequency and profiles Haixu Tang School of Informatics

2 Genome and genes Genome: an organism’s genetic material (Car encyclopedia) Gene: a discrete units of hereditary information located on the chromosomes and consisting of DNA. (Chapters to make components of a car, or to use and drive a car).

3 Gene Prediction: Computational Challenge aatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaa tgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgc taagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatt taccttggaatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaa tggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctggga tccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcc gatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggat ccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcct gcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagctgggatcc gatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatat gctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctggga tccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcc gatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcatgc ggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaat gcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgct aagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcggctatgctaatgaat ggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggc tatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgcatgcggctat gctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgc ggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctg cggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcatgcgg

4 Gene Prediction: Computational Challenge aatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaa tgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgc taagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatt taccttggaatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaa tggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctggga tccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcc gatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggat ccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcct gcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagctgggatcc gatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatat gctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctggga tccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcc gatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcatgc ggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaat gcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgct aagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcggctatgctaatgaat ggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggc tatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgcatgcggctat gctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgc ggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctg cggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcatgcgg

5 Gene Prediction: Computational Challenge aatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaa tgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgc taagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatt taccttggaatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaa tggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctggga tccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcc gatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggat ccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcct gcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagctgggatcc gatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatat gctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctggga tccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatcc gatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcatgc ggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaat gcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgct aagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcggctatgctaatgaat ggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggc tatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgcatgcggctat gctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgc ggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctg cggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcatgcgg Gene!

6 Gene: A sequence of nucleotides coding for protein Gene Prediction Problem: Determine the beginning and end positions of genes in a genome Gene Prediction: Computational Challenge

7 A simple model for gene prediction: frequency-based DNA modeling DNA is a double strand molecule –G-C pair  strong –A-T pair  weak Coding regions often have higher GC content than non-coding regions

8 Frequency-based DNA modeling of coding vs. non-coding regions To predict coding regions in an organism (e.g. human), collect a set of known coding and non-coding DNA sequences from this organism (training set) Compute the frequency distribution of GC and AT pairs in coding and non-coding regions, respectively: F (f GC |c), F (f AT |c)=1- F (f GC |c); F (f GC |nc), F (f AT |nc)=1- F (f GC |nc);

9 A example from zygomycete Phycomyces blakesleeanus f GC non-coding coding

10 Model comparison Two models: coding vs. non-coding Given a DNA sequence, its likelihood of being a coding sequence, based on its GC content f GC f GC non-coding coding P(c|f GC )=P(c)(P(f GC |c)/[P(f GC |c)P(c)+ P(f GC |nc)]P(nc)) P(nc|f GC )=P(nc)(P(f GC |nc)/[P(f GC |c)P(c)+ P(f GC |nc)P(nc)]) Assume P(c)=P(nc), P(f GC |c)= F (ff GC |nc), C=log(P(f GC |c)/P(f GC |nc))

11 Sliding window approach aatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatg ctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgc ggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcgg ctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccg atgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctg cggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcat gcggctatgcaagctgggatcctgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgctaagct gggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaatgca tgcggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggcta tgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgcatgcg gctatgctaagctcatgcggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatga caatgcatgcggctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctgcggc tatgctaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatgcta agctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcggctatgctaatgaatggtcttgggatttaccttggaatatgctaa tgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggaatgcatgcggctatgctaagctgggatccgatgacaatgcatgcg gctatgctaatgcatgcggctatgcaagctgggatccgatgactatgctaagctgcggctatgctaatgca tgcggctatgctaagctcatgcgg

12 Sliding window approach c Sequence Coding region

13 Protein RNA DNA transcription translation CCTGAGCCAACTATTGATGAA PEPTIDEPEPTIDE CCUGAGCCAACUAUUGAUGAA A more complicated model: codon usages

14 Codon: 3 consecutive nucleotides 4 3 = 64 possible codons Genetic code is degenerative and redundant –Includes start and stop codons –An amino acid may be coded by more than one codon (codon degeneracy) Translating Nucleotides into Amino Acids

15 In 1961 Sydney Brenner and Francis Crick discovered frameshift mutations Systematically deleted nucleotides from DNA –Single and double deletions dramatically altered protein product –Effects of triple deletions were minor –Conclusion: every triplet of nucleotides, each codon, codes for exactly one amino acid in a protein Codons

16 UAA, UAG and UGA correspond to 3 Stop codons that (together with Start codon ATG) delineate Open Reading Frames Genetic Code and Stop Codons

17 Six Frames in a DNA Sequence stop codons – TAA, TAG, TGA start codons - ATG GACGTCTGCTTTGGAGAACTACATCAACCGGACTGTGGCTGTTATTACTTCTGATGGCAGAATGATTGTG CTGCAGACGAAACCTCTTGATGTAGTTGGCCTGACACCGACAATAATGAAGACTACCGTCTTACTAACAC GACGTCTGCTTTGGAGAACTACATCAACCGGACTGTGGCTGTTATTACTTCTGATGGCAGAATGATTGTG CTGCAGACGAAACCTCTTGATGTAGTTGGCCTGACACCGACAATAATGAAGACTACCGTCTTACTAACAC

18 Testing reading frames Create a 64-element hash table and count the frequencies of codons in a reading frame; Amino acids typically have more than one codon, but in nature certain codons are more in use; Uneven use of the codons may characterize a coding region;

19 Codon Usage in Human Genome

20 AA codon /1000 frac Ser TCG Ser TCA Ser TCT Ser TCC Ser AGT Ser AGC Pro CCG Pro CCA Pro CCT Pro CCC AA codon /1000 frac Leu CTG Leu CTA Leu CTT Leu CTC Ala GCG Ala GCA Ala GCT Ala GCC Gln CAG Gln CAA Codon Usage in Mouse Genome

21 Using codon frequency to find correct reading frame Consider sequence x 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 5 x 6 x 7 x 8 x 9…. where x i is a nucleotide let p 1 = p x1 x2 x3 p x4 x5 x6 …. p 2 = p x2 x3 x4 p x5 x6 x7 …. p 3 = p x3 x4 x5 p x6 x7 x8 …. then probability that ith reading frame is the coding frame is: p i p 1 + p 2 + p 3 slide a window along the sequence and compute P i P i =

22 Adding the background model: gene finding In the previous model, we assume at least one reading frame is the codon sequence  testing reading frames, not gene finding Adding a background model –p 0 = p x1 p x2 p x3 p x4 …. –Based on the nucleotide frequency in the non-coding sequence –P i = p i / (p 0 +p 1 +p 2 +p 3 ) In practice, this model should be extended to all six reading frames.

23 Protein secondary structure prediction Amino acid sequence NLKTEWPELVGKSVEE AKKVILQDKPEAQIIVL PVGTIVTMEYRIDRVR LFVDKLDNIAEVPRVG folding

24 Basic structural units of proteins: Secondary structure α-helix β-sheet Secondary structures, α-helix and β-sheet, have regular hydrogen-bonding patterns.

25 Secondary Structure Prediction Given a protein sequence, secondary structure prediction aims at predicting the state of each amino acid as being either H (helix), E (extended=strand), or O (other). The quality of secondary structure prediction is measured with a “3-state accuracy” score, or Q 3. Q 3 is the percent of residues that match “reality” (X-ray structure).

26 Chou and Fasman: a frequency model P(  |S)=  s p(  |s)=  s p(  |f(s)) –p(  |f(s))~p(f(s)|  )/p(f(s)) –Similarly for  and turn structures

27 Amino Acid  -Helix  -SheetTurn Ala Cys Leu Met Glu Gln His Lys Val Ile Phe Tyr Trp Thr Gly Ser Asp Asn Pro Arg Chou and Fasman: a frequency model Favors  -Helix Favors  -strand Favors turn

28 Profile model The frequency model does not consider the order of the training sequences –Permuting the training sequences will not change the model In some cases, the order is of important biological meaning, e.g. sequence motifs; Profile model fully constrains the order of the training sequences

29 Profile / PSSM LTMTRGDIGNYLGLTVETISRLLGRFQKSGML LTMTRGDIGNYLGLTIETISRLLGRFQKSGMI LTMTRGDIGNYLGLTVETISRLLGRFQKSEIL LTMTRGDIGNYLGLTVETISRLLGRLQKMGIL LAMSRNEIGNYLGLAVETVSRVFSRFQQNELI LAMSRNEIGNYLGLAVETVSRVFTRFQQNGLI LPMSRNEIGNYLGLAVETVSRVFTRFQQNGLL VRMSREEIGNYLGLTLETVSRLFSRFGREGLI LRMSREEIGSYLGLKLETVSRTLSKFHQEGLI LPMCRRDIGDYLGLTLETVSRALSQLHTQGIL LPMSRRDIADYLGLTVETVSRAVSQLHTDGVL LPMSRQDIADYLGLTIETVSRTFTKLERHGAI DNA / proteins Segments of the same length L; Often represented as Positional frequency matrix;

30 A DNA profile (matrix) TATAAA TATAAT TATAAA TATTAA TTAAAA TAGAAA T C A G T C A G Sparse data  pseudo-counts

31 Searching profiles: sampling Give a sequence S of length L, compute the likelihood ratio of being generated from this profile vs. from background model: –R(S|P)= –Searching motifs in a sequence: sliding window approach

32 Testing a motif Equivalent to computing the significance of a sequence motif TATAAA TATAAT TATAAA TATTAA TTAAAA TAGAAA TCGAAT GCATTT ACTTAA CGCTGC AAACCG CGATAC CCAAGT GACCTA T C A G T C A G

33 Model comparison: relative entropy H(x) =  i  P(x j ) log (P(x j )/P 0 (x j ))= –b j  the random background distribution T C A G T C A G

34 Probability distribution What is the probability P(H|B) of getting a matrix with a relative entropy H from the background model B = {b j }? p(h)  the probability distribution of relative entropy score for the frequency of a single column (can be pre-calculated) P(H) = –convolution of function p(s), can be calculated only approximately by Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT)

35 Finding a motif atgaccgggatactgatagaagaaaggttgggggcgtacacattagataaacgtatgaagtacgttagactcggcgccgccg acccctattttttgagcagatttagtgacctggaaaaaaaatttgagtacaaaacttttccgaatacaataaaacggcggga tgagtatccctgggatgacttaaaataatggagtggtgctctcccgatttttgaatatgtaggatcattcgccagggtccga gctgagaattggatgcaaaaaaagggattgtccacgcaatcgcgaaccaacgcggacccaaaggcaagaccgataaaggaga tcccttttgcggtaatgtgccgggaggctggttacgtagggaagccctaacggacttaatataataaaggaagggcttatag gtcaatcatgttcttgtgaatggatttaacaataagggctgggaccgcttggcgcacccaaattcagtgtgggcgagcgcaa cggttttggcccttgttagaggcccccgtataaacaaggagggccaattatgagagagctaatctatcgcgtgcgtgttcat aacttgagttaaaaaatagggagccctggggcacatacaagaggagtcttccttatcagttaatgctgtatgacactatgta ttggcccattggctaaaagcccaacttgacaaatggaagatagaatccttgcatactaaaaaggagcggaccgaaagggaag ctggtgagcaacgacagattcttacgtgcattagctcgcttccggggatctaatagcacgaagcttactaaaaaggagcgga

36 Motif finding is Difficult atgaccgggatactgatAgAAgAAAGGttGGGggcgtacacattagataaacgtatgaagtacgttagactcggcgccgccg acccctattttttgagcagatttagtgacctggaaaaaaaatttgagtacaaaacttttccgaatacAAtAAAAcGGcGGGa tgagtatccctgggatgacttAAAAtAAtGGaGtGGtgctctcccgatttttgaatatgtaggatcattcgccagggtccga gctgagaattggatgcAAAAAAAGGGattGtccacgcaatcgcgaaccaacgcggacccaaaggcaagaccgataaaggaga tcccttttgcggtaatgtgccgggaggctggttacgtagggaagccctaacggacttaatAtAAtAAAGGaaGGGcttatag gtcaatcatgttcttgtgaatggatttAAcAAtAAGGGctGGgaccgcttggcgcacccaaattcagtgtgggcgagcgcaa cggttttggcccttgttagaggcccccgtAtAAAcAAGGaGGGccaattatgagagagctaatctatcgcgtgcgtgttcat aacttgagttAAAAAAtAGGGaGccctggggcacatacaagaggagtcttccttatcagttaatgctgtatgacactatgta ttggcccattggctaaaagcccaacttgacaaatggaagatagaatccttgcatActAAAAAGGaGcGGaccgaaagggaag ctggtgagcaacgacagattcttacgtgcattagctcgcttccggggatctaatagcacgaagcttActAAAAAGGaGcGGa AgAAgAAAGGttGGG cAAtAAAAcGGcGGG..|..|||.|..|||

37 The Motif Finding Problem Given a set of DNA sequences: cctgatagacgctatctggctatccacgtacgtaggtcctctgtgcgaatctatgcgtttccaaccat agtactggtgtacatttgatacgtacgtacaccggcaacctgaaacaaacgctcagaaccagaagtgc aaacgtacgtgcaccctctttcttcgtggctctggccaacgagggctgatgtataagacgaaaatttt agcctccgatgtaagtcatagctgtaactattacctgccacccctattacatcttacgtacgtataca ctgttatacaacgcgtcatggcggggtatgcgttttggtcgtcgtacgctcgatcgttaacgtacgtc Find the motif in each of the individual sequences

38 The Motif Finding Problem If starting positions s=(s 1, s 2,… s t ) are given, finding consensus is easy because we can simply construct (and evaluate) the profile to find the motif. But… the starting positions s are usually not given. How can we find the “best” profile matrix? –Gibbs sampling –Expectation-Maximization algorithm

39 Conclusion Frequency and profile are two basic models for sequence analysis; They represent two extreme models in terms of incorporating order information in the sequences; Model selection should be based on biological ideas;


Download ppt "Probabilistic sequence modeling I: frequency and profiles Haixu Tang School of Informatics."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google