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 Situational Leadership & Teamwork John Roberto LifelongFaith Associates

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Presentation on theme: " Situational Leadership & Teamwork John Roberto LifelongFaith Associates"— Presentation transcript:

1  Situational Leadership & Teamwork John Roberto LifelongFaith Associates

2 Leadership for Adult Faith Formation “The leader of the future isn’t a person. It is a team. It is a group of people gifted and called by God to lead. It is a community drawn together by a sense of the possible within a congregation and committed to making God’s kingdom just a bit more real in their time and place. This fact alone changes the notions of leadership that pastors and congregations have operated under for years. It breaks down barriers between professional and lay leaders. It refocuses our attention on gifts and call as being the basis for ministry.”

3 Leadership for Adult Faith Formation “The focus on gifts and call leads us to a new humility about leadership. It reminds us that no one has all the gifts, but all the gifts are present within the Body. This is why a leadership team is essential for the future. When the challenges before us are great we need to take advantage of every gift God has given. That is only possible if we approach the task of leadership as a team.”

4 Leadership for Adult Faith Formation “Someone will need to see his or her primary call as bringing together the group… That responsibility requires the eyes of Jesus to see the gifts in others and call them into ministry… The team leader’s responsibility will be to gather those who are needed, guide the development of a common vision for their work, and support and encourage their efforts.” (Jeffrey Jones, “Leading for the Future,” Congregations, Winter 2006)

5 Leadership for Adult Faith Formation Part 1. Situational Leadership 1. Leadership Behaviors: Directive and Supportive 2. Development Level of Team 3. Four Leadership Styles

6 Leadership for Adult Faith Formation Part 2. Facilitating Teams 1. Role of a Facilitator 2. Planning a Meeting 3. Facilitating a Meeting 4. Stages of Group Development 5. Balancing Task and Relationship Functions in Groups 6. Leading Effective Group Discussions 7. Decision-Making with Groups

7 Leading Teams Leader Behaviors  Directive Behavior is defined as: The extent to which a leader engages in one-way communication; spells out the follower(s) role and tells the follower(s) what to do, where to do it, when to do it and how to do it; and then closely supervises performance. Three words can be used to define Directive Behavior: structure, control, and supervise.

8 Leading Teams Leader Behaviors  Supportive Behavior is defined as: The extent to which a leader engages in two-way communication, listens, provides support and encouragement, facilitates interaction, and involves the follower(s) in decision-making. Three words can be used to define Supportive Behavior: praise, listen, and facilitate.

9 Leading Teams Development Level  D1 - Low Competence, High Commitment “Enthusiastic Beginner”  D2 - Some Competence, Low Commitment “Disillusioned Learner”  D3 - Moderate to High Competence, Variable Commitment “Reluctant Contributor”  D4 - High Competence, High Commitment “Peak Performer”

10 S3 S1S4 S2 Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior DEVELOPMENT LEVEL OF FOLLOWER(S) DEVELOPED DEVELOPING HIGH LOW MODERATE D4 D1 D2 D3 THE FOUR LEADERSHIP STYLES DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR (High) (Low) SUPPORTIVE BEHAVIORSUPPORTIVE BEHAVIOR

11 S3 S1S4 S2 Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior THE FOUR LEADERSHIP STYLES DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR (High) (Low) SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIORSUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DEVELOPMENT LEVEL OF FOLLOWER(S) DEVELOPED DEVELOPING HIGH LOW MODERATE D4 D1 D2 D3

12 Leading Teams Directing  High Directive, Low Supportive  Leader Defines Roles of Followers  Problem Solving and Decision Making Initiated by the Leader  One-way Communication

13 DEVELOPMENT LEVEL OF FOLLOWER(S) S3 S1S4 S2 Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior THE FOUR LEADERSHIP STYLES DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR (High) (Low) SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIORSUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DEVELOPED DEVELOPING HIGH LOW MODERATE D4 D1 D2 D3

14 Leading Teams Coaching  High Directive, High Supportive  Leader Now Attempts to Hear Followers Suggestions, Ideas, and Opinions  Two-way Communication  Control Over Decision Making Remains with the Leader

15 S3 S1S4 S2 Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior THE FOUR LEADERSHIP STYLES DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR (High) (Low) SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIORSUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DEVELOPMENT LEVEL OF FOLLOWER(S) DEVELOPED DEVELOPING HIGH LOW MODERATE D4 D1 D2 D3

16 Leading Teams Supporting  High Supportive, Low Directive  Focus of Control Shifts to Follower  Leader Actively Listens  Follower Has Ability and Knowledge to Do the Task

17 S3 S1S4 S2 Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior DEVELOPMENT LEVEL OF FOLLOWER(S) DEVELOPED DEVELOPING HIGH LOW MODERATE D4 D1 D2 D3 THE FOUR LEADERSHIP STYLES DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR (High) (Low) SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIORSUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR

18 Leading Teams Delegating  Low Supportive, Low Directive  Leader Discusses Problems With Followers  Seeks Joint Agreement on Problem Definitions  Decision Making Is Handled by the Subordinate  They “Run Their Own Show”

19 S3 S1S4 S2 Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior DEVELOPMENT LEVEL OF FOLLOWER(S) DEVELOPED DEVELOPING HIGH LOW MODERATE D4 D1 D2 D3 THE FOUR LEADERSHIP STYLES DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR (High) (Low) SUPPORTIVE BEHAVIORSUPPORTIVE BEHAVIOR

20 Leading Teams The Leader’s Goal Build your follower’s development level so you can start using less time- consuming styles (S3 and S4) and still get high quality results.

21 Leading Teams Increasing Performance Potential 1. Tell Them What You Want Them to Do. 2. Show Them What You Want Them to Do. 3. Observe Performance - Focus on the Positive. 4. Praise progress, or 5. Redirect.

22 Leading Teams Why teams fail Lack of a defined purpose and a team approach to achieving it 2. Inability to decide the work for which they are interdependent and mutually accountable 3. Lack of mutual accountability 4. Lack of resources to do the job, including time

23 Leading Teams 5. Lack of effective leadership; lack of shared leadership 6. Lack of norms that foster creativity and excellence 7. Lack of planning 8. Lack of management support 9. Inability to deal with conflict 10. Lack of training on all levels on group skills

24 Leading Teams 7 Characteristics of High Performing Teams 1. Purpose and values 2. Empowerment 3. Relationships and communication 4. Flexibility 5. Optimal productivity 6. Recognition and appreciation 7. Morale

25 S3 S1S4 S2 Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior DEVELOPED DEVELOPING HIGH LOW MODERATE D4 D1 D2 D3 THE FOUR LEADERSHIP STYLES DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR (High) (Low) SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIORSUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR 4. Production 3. Integration 2. Dissatisfaction 1. Orientation Matching Leadership Style to Team Development Stages

26 Facilitation Core Practices 1. Stay neutral on content 2. Listen actively 3. Ask questions 4. Paraphrase to clarify 5. Synthesize ideas 6. Stay on track 7. Give and receive feedback 8. Test assumptions

27 Facilitation Core Practices 9. Collect ideas 10. Summarize clearly 11. Label sidetracks 12. Park it 13. Use the spell-check button

28 Facilitating Groups The Role of a Facilitator  defining overall goal  providing processes that help members make high-quality decisions  guiding group discussion to keep it on track  making accurate notes that reflect the ideas of members  making sure that assumptions are surfaced and tested  making decisions that take all members’ opinions into account

29 Facilitating Groups  providing feedback to the group  managing conflict using a collaborative approach  helping the group communicate effectively  creating an environment in which members enjoy a positive, growing experience while they work to attain group goals  fostering leadership in others by sharing the responsibility for leading the group

30 Facilitating Groups Planning a Meeting 3 Objectives 3 Timing 3 Participants 3 Agenda 3 Physical Needs 3 Room Arrangement 3 Role Assignments 3 Follow-up Methods

31 Facilitating Groups Stages of Group Development  Forming: Gathering and Orientation  Storming: Making Connections  Norming: Establishing an Identity  Performing: Getting the Job Done

32 Facilitating Groups Balancing Task and Relationship Functions in Groups  Relationship Behavior/Functions  Task Behavior/Functions

33 Developing Leadership 3 Components of a Leadership System 1. Inviting People into Leadership 2. Preparing and Training Leaders 3. Supporting Leaders

34 Developing Leadership 1. Inviting People into Leadership  Identifying the leaders you need for lifelong faith formation  Developing job descriptions for each leadership position  Searching for persons with leadership potential using parish-wide strategies and personal invitation  Placing people in leadership positions

35 Developing Leadership Parish-Wide Strategies Personal Invitation Strategies

36 Developing Leadership  Personal invitations  Personal recommendations and invitations: letter with brochure and interest finder, phone calls, personal meetings  Current leaders invite new leaders  Different parish groups/ministries take responsibility for aspects of the program  Integrate leadership needs within an annual parish-wide time and talent survey/stewardship Sunday.

37 Developing Leadership  Come and see opportunities  Descriptions of leadership positions (“want ads”) in parish newsletter or bulletin  An informational dinner for potential parish leaders with an information packet on the programming, presentations (visual), and invite them into leadership roles. Develop a “want ad” placemat to describe ways they can be involved as a leader.

38 Developing Leadership 2. Preparing and Training Leaders  Provide a variety of ways to learn.  Customize the training options to each individual and the ways they learn best.  Make explicit connections between training and the work of the leader/facilitator.  Focus on just-in-time and in-context learning.  Build-in transfer of learning strategies.

39 Developing Leadership 1. Independent Learning 2. Apprenticeship Learning 3. Group Learning 4. Institutional Learning 5. Spiritual Formation

40 Leadership Development 3. Supporting Leaders  Authorizing leaders to begin service  Providing the information and resources leaders need  Gathering information and evaluating the work of leaders  Expressing and celebrating the support of the church


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