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Middle School Workshops World History and Geography Seminar Series Conclusion: Contemporary Global Issues and Wrap Up Dr. Craig Benjamin Session Ten: Conclusion.

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Presentation on theme: "Middle School Workshops World History and Geography Seminar Series Conclusion: Contemporary Global Issues and Wrap Up Dr. Craig Benjamin Session Ten: Conclusion."— Presentation transcript:

1 Middle School Workshops World History and Geography Seminar Series Conclusion: Contemporary Global Issues and Wrap Up Dr. Craig Benjamin Session Ten: Conclusion

2 The Final Session! Hope you’ve enjoyed this INTENSIVE and EXHAUSTING two-day workshop on the new Michigan World History Content Expectations for Middle School teachers Covered an enormous amount of ground through the illustrated lectures on the content of the new CEs Remember every lecture PP is available to you for your use in the classroom, or in preparing your own lessons We will try and wrap everything up by tying all this content to the Contemporary Global Issues section of the CEs

3 Part One: The Contemporary Global Issues Component of the New Content Expectations

4 History as a Whole The Great Eras of Human History ERA 1: PALEOLITHIC From 200,000 – 12,000 BP Most of human history; early signs of ‘collective learning’; small communities; global migrations; megafaunal extinctions; slow population growth ERA 2: AGRARIAN From 12,000 BP – 200 BP Intensification; rapid population growth; cities, states, empires; writing; different histories in different world zones ERA 3: MODERN From 200 BP - Now Single, global system; rapid growth in energy use; increasing rate of extinctions; increased life expectancies

5 Three Eras of Human History Based on Population Growth Data from David Christian, Maps of Time, p. 143 Paleolithic Era: extremely slow change Agrarian Era: Change accelerates Modern Era: Change faster than ever

6 Grade Six (p. 54) Global Issues Past and Present (H1.4.3, G1.2.6) Throughout the school year the students are introduced to topics that address global issues that integrate time and place Included are capstone projects that entail the investigation of historical and contemporary global issues that have significance for the student and are clearly linked to the world outside the classroom The topics and issues are developed as capstone projects within units and at the end of the course Regular experiences with those topics and issues are necessary during each grade in order to build the background students will require to complete in-depth capstone projects

7 G6.1 Global Topic Investigation and Issue Analysis (P2) Capstone projects require the student to use geography, history, economics, and government to inquire about major contemporary and historical issues and events linked to the world outside the classroom The core disciplines are used to interpret the past and plan for the future. During the school year the students will complete at least three capstone projects. (National Geography Standards 17 and 18, p. 179 and 181) 6 – G6.1.1 Contemporary Investigations – Conduct research on contemporary global topics and issues, compose persuasive essays, and develop a plan for action. (H1.4.3, G1.2.6, See P3 and P4)

8 Contemporary Investigation Topic One Global Climate Change – Investigate the impact of global climate change and describe the significance for human/environment relationships Desertification in China

9 Contemporary Investigation Topic Two Globalization – Investigate the significance of globalization and describe its impact on international economic and political relationships.

10 Contemporary Investigation Topic Three Migration – Investigate issues arising from international movement of people and the economic, political, and cultural consequences.

11 Contemporary Investigation Topic Four Human-Environmental Interactions – Investigate how policies from the past and their implementation have had positive or negative consequences for the environment in the future Extinct Megafauna, Australia

12 Contemporary Investigation Topic Five Natural Disasters – Investigate the significance of natural disasters and describe the effects on human and physical systems, and the economy, and the responsibilities of government. Flooding in Bangladesh

13 Contemporary Investigation Topics Related Specifically to Ancient World History 6 – G6.1.2 Investigations Designed for Ancient World History Eras – Conduct research on global topics and issues, compose persuasive essays, and develop a plan for action (H1.4.3, G1.2.6, See P3 and P4) Note: Additional global investigation topics have been identified for connections to World History Eras 1, 2, and 3 studies Students investigate contemporary topics and issues that they have studied in an ancient world history context The investigations may be addressed at the conclusion of each Era or may be included at the conclusion of the course

14 Contemporary Investigation Topics – Related to Content in World History and Contemporary Geography WHG Era 1 Population Growth and Resources – Investigate how population growth affects resource availability Migration – Investigate the significance of migrations of peoples and the resulting benefits and challenges

15 Ideas for both the ‘Western Hemisphere’ topics in.. Lect 2: Paleolithic migrations (within Africa and globally); population growth as related to resource availability Lect 3: Population growth with the adoption of agriculture Lect 4: Early migrations to the Americas; early plant and animal domesticates; population growth in early American cultures Lect 5: Migrants who created Aztec and Inca societies; where they settled related to resource availability; settlements in North America dependant on resource availability (e.g. Anasazi, Inuit, Cahokia); estimated populations of the Americas on eve of arrival of Europeans

16 Investigate the significance of sustainable agriculture and its role in helping societies produce enough food for people Ideas for this topic in: Lect 3: Agriculture Lect 4: Farming practices of early American societies; Mayan decline as a result of over farming Lect 5: Farming practices of Aztecs and Incas (e.g. chinampas and terracing); sustainable agriculture in North America – Anasazi, Cahokia; impact of significant differences in agricultural ‘timing’ in the Americas and Afroeurasia WHG Era 2 – Sustainable Agriculture

17 WHG Era 3 Development Investigate economic effects on development in a region and its ecosystems and societies. Ideas in: Lect 5: Development of Meso- and South America by Aztecs and Incas; impact on ecosystems; economic growth; impact on society; how do we explain differences between American and Afroeurasian economies and populations in 1500

18 Grade Seven (p. 67) G6 Global Issues Past and Present (H1.4.3, G1.2.6) Throughout the school year the students are introduced to topics that address global issues that integrate time and place Included are capstone projects that entail the investigation of historical and contemporary global issues that have significance for the student and are clearly linked to the world outside the classroom The topics and issues are developed as capstone projects within units and at the end of the course Regular experiences with those topics and issues are necessary during each grade in order to build the background students will require to complete in-depth capstone projects.

19 G6.1 Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4) Capstone projects require the student to use geography, history, economics, and government to inquire about major contemporary and historical issues and events linked to the world outside the classroom The core disciplines are used to interpret the past and plan for the future During the school year the students will complete at least three capstone projects. (National Geography Standards 17 and 18, p. 179 and 181) 7 – G6.1.1 Contemporary Investigations – Conduct research on contemporary global topics and issues, compose persuasive essays, and develop a plan for action. (H1.4.3, G1.2.6, See P3 and P4)

20 Contemporary Investigation Topic One Conflict, Stability, and Change – Investigate the significance of conflict, stability, and change in governmental systems within the region. Sarajevo, 1990s Biafran Civil War, Nigeria,

21 Contemporary Investigation Topic Two Diversity and Nationalism – Investigate the tensions that may develop between cultural diversity and nationalism within a country and their consequences.

22 Contemporary Investigation Topic Three Urbanization – Investigate urbanization and its consequences for the world’s population.

23 Contemporary Investigation Topic Four Oil and Society – Investigate the significance of how oil has changed nations as both consumers and producers of this natural resource.

24 Contemporary Investigation Topic Five Children in the World – Investigate issues affecting children such as health, labor, and war.

25 Contemporary Investigation Topic Six Regional Cooperation – Explain the significance of and barriers to regional cooperation.

26 7 – G6.1.2 Investigations Designed for Ancient World History Eras – Conduct research on global topics and issues, compose persuasive essays, and develop a plan for action. (H1.4.3, G1.2.6, See P3 and P4) Note: Additional global investigation topics have been identified for connections to World History Eras 1, 2, and 3 studies Students investigate contemporary topics and issues that they have studied in an ancient world history context The investigations may be addressed at the conclusion of each Era or may be included at the conclusion of the course.

27 Contemporary Investigation Topics – Related to Content in World History and Contemporary Geography WHG Era 1 Population Growth and Resources – Investigate how population growth affects resource availability. Migration – Investigate the significance of migrations of peoples and the resulting benefits and challenges.

28 Ideas for both these ‘Eastern Hemisphere’ topics in: Lect 6: Pastoralist migrations; Semitic migrations; Indo-European migrations; migration of Hyksos into Egypt Lect 7: Migrations into India; Indus Civilization populations and resources; Indian climate; Aryan invasions (?); Chinese climate and resources Lect 8 Part III: Bantu migrations in early Africa

29 WHG Era 2 Sustainable Agriculture Investigate the significance of sustainable agriculture and its role in helping societies produce enough food for people. Ideas in: Lect 6: Agricultural practices of Sumerians and Egyptians Lect 7: Indus Civilization agriculture; Indus environmental degradation; early farming cultures in China; significance of two great Chinese rivers for farming Lect 8 Part III: Early agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa

30 Contemporary Investigation Topics – Related to Content in World History and Contemporary Geography WHG Era 3 Development – Investigate economic effects on development in a region and its ecosystems and societies. Religious Conflict – Investigate conflict that arises from varying religious beliefs.

31 Ideas for ‘Eastern Hemisphere’ Development Topic in: Lect 8 Part I: Impacts of economic development of Zhou China; of Qin China; of Han China Lect 8 Part II: Indian social and economic development; Mauryan economy Lect 8 Part III: Impact of economic and agricultural development on African cultures Lect 8 Part IV: Economic (trade) growth and impact on classical Minoans, Mycenaeans and classical Greece Lect 8 Part V: Economic development of the growth of empire on Roman society Lect 8 Part VI: The Silk Roads as the first ‘world-system’ and the beginning of globalization

32 Ideas for ‘Eastern Hemisphere’ Religious Conflict Topic in: Lect 8 Part II: Reactions against classical Indian Vedic religion Lect 9: Rise of Buddhism; official support for Buddhism; spread along Silk Roads; rise of Hinduism; rise of Judaism; conflicts with Philistines etc; conflicts between Roman pagan religion and early Christianity; rise of Islam; major points of difference between Islam and Hinduism; Islamic cultural practices (role of women eg)

33 Conclusion Good luck as you embark upon this new and exciting era in Michigan social studies teaching Those of us who designed the new social studies content expectations are excited about the impact this enhanced global awareness will have on the children of Michigan The CEs are now regarded as the best in the nation, and the standard to which all other states aspire We do realize that these new CEs create a huge challenge for Michigan teachers at all levels But we believe that in the hands of outstanding teachers like you folks, the future of education, and the lives of tens of thousands of young Michigan students, are in great hands! Goodbye and good luck fellow teachers Thanks for inviting me, and have a great time teaching world history and geography!


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