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Emergency Preparedness For Libraries 10 Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning Disaster Planning in the Library and Beyond Rockford Librarians July.

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Presentation on theme: "Emergency Preparedness For Libraries 10 Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning Disaster Planning in the Library and Beyond Rockford Librarians July."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emergency Preparedness For Libraries 10 Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning Disaster Planning in the Library and Beyond Rockford Librarians July 22, 2010 Holly Ann Burt

2 Course Objectives Identify risks to their regions and their institutions from natural and human-caused emergencies and disasters Develop a plan for continuation of core library services in the event of an emergency or disaster Identify advocacy possibilities within both the organization and the community Know how to obtain help within their regions or nationwide for assistance in providing continuity of services following an emergency or disaster Know where to obtain help and/or training in collection preservation where applicable

3 Part I 10-Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning

4 Part II Disaster Planning in the Library and Beyond

5 Agenda Disaster Struck Case Study Impact on Staff Know Your Library Preparations Beyond the Library ◦ Connecting with other Libraries ◦ Connections in the Community We’re Back - Now What? Wrap-Up and Evaluation

6 Definitions Response ◦ Actions immediately after emergency that provide temporary care for people, collections & property and prevent avoidable casualties & property damage Salvage ◦ Actions taken to evacuate or retrieve collections & property from damaged areas and to restore collections as close as possible to their original condition Recovery ◦ Actions taken after emergency to return to normal operations

7 Disaster Struck Case Study Fire broke out on the first floor of medical library at Springfield University at 2:00 a.m. Saturday morning Computer lab and reference, reserve and general collections, public service and technical services are on the first floor; Library administration, computer servers, journals and institutional archives are in the basement; There is no priority list for collection or equipment The building is one floor (no sprinklers), plus a sprinklered basement No electricity = no elevator or HVAC Fire department still on the scene; used as little water as possible, but the fire was very intense and “lots of stuff is burned and wet” Library director called you as you are member of the Disaster Team It is 7:00 a.m. and you are outside the library. In 2 hours you will have access to the building

8 Impact on Staff No one who witnesses a disaster is untouched by it.

9 Impact on Staff Human Dynamics ◦ People approach tasks differently ◦ People interact differently ◦ People have issues going on in their lives that affect their responses Stages of Grief ◦ Shock/Denial, Pain/Guilt, Anger/Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome

10 Impact on Staff Phases of Stress Reaction ◦ Pre-crisis phase  Planning and disaster preparation [Disaster occurs] ◦ Impact phase ◦ Immediate post disaster phase  Recoil and rescue  Confusion / disorganization / trial & error ◦ Recovery phase

11 Impact on Staff Does the Disaster Plan include Staff Care? ◦ Impact Phase:  Account for all personnel  Care for injured  Emergency contacts  To get help for injured  To contact family members  Individual Continuity of Operations plan

12 Impact on Staff Does the Disaster Plan include Staff Care? ◦ Immediate post disaster/Recovery  Support opportunities (Institutional, Community Mental Health Centers)  Short term staffing (Up to 1 week )  Longer term staffing  Communication  Maintaining moral  Sharing stories  Debriefing opportunities

13 Impact on Staff Maintaining Morale ◦ Communicate ◦ Set up regular debriefings ◦ Give people time to talk about the experience ◦ Provide flexibility in scheduling and a variety of tasks ◦ Get local companies to donate food, snacks and drinks for staff and volunteers

14 Impact on Staff Debriefing – focus on healing o Fact gathering What happened? What did you do? What was your role? o Thoughts What would you do differently? o Physical/emotional Are you exhibiting any symptoms indicating you need help? o Teaching self care Stay in touch with friends, eat well, laugh, avoid dependence on alcohol/drugs, exercise

15 Know Your Library Location, Location, Location Types of Plans Communication Technology Documentation and Materials

16 Know Your Library Location, Location, Location ◦ Institutional organization chart ◦ Role of library in institutional disaster plan ◦ Relationship with Incident Command System ◦ Partnerships with institutional emergency committees (risk, safety, etc.)

17 Know Your Library Types of Plans ◦ Library Continuity of Service  Major Disaster  Minor Disaster (5 or less days out of office)  Pandemics ◦ dPlan (usually at the institutional level) ◦ PReP - Pocket Response Plan (includes Communications and Actions) See for examples of plans

18 Know Your Library Communication ◦ Internal communications  Library staff in building / not in building  During differing phases of a disaster ◦ Cross-organizational  Information shared with appropriate leadership  Partnering/Advocacy  Hazard Vulnerability Assessment (Institution and/or library)  Who’s in charge of PR/Media during a disaster?

19 Know Your Library Initial Situation Report ◦ Who’s in charge? ◦ Safety issues? ◦ What has happened? Cause? ◦ Nature & extent of damage? ◦ Who discovered/reported? ◦ What’s been done so far? ◦ Can staff handle initially? ◦ Security status? ◦ Who’s handling the media?

20 Know Your Library Documentation and Materials ◦ Grab and Go Book – where the keys, codes, computer documentation, passwords, etc., are kept; everything needed to get going in a new location ◦ Grab and Go packs for individual staff members: i nclude  Car charger for cell phones  Battery for laptops ◦ Disaster Supplies

21 Disaster Supplies

22 Know Your Library Documentation and Materials ◦ Additional documents:  Emergency & Evacuation Procedures  Floor Plans & Facility/Location Assessment  Collection/Equipment Priorities (PreP for Collections)  Salvage Procedures  Insurance Policies  Inventory Control Process  Disaster Recovery Contract

23 Know Your Library Technology ◦ Library Webpage  Who’s in charge during a disaster  What changes should be made to site ◦ Wireless options – especially after a disaster ◦ Where are the hydroles (water/electric)? Are they mapped?

24 Ready.gov

25 Preparations Beyond the Library Connecting with other Libraries ◦ Partnerships ◦ Communication Connections in the Community ◦ Build Relationships with First Responders ◦ Identify Your Local State/Federal Agency Representatives ◦ Access Training Opportunities

26 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connecting with other Libraries When creating partnerships consider ◦ Capability criteria (Service lines, size, collection, consortia relationships) ◦ Services (Free Share, DOCLINE, COLC, NLM EAI, SFX, ILLIAD Net) ◦ Other Connections (Consortia, MLA Sections, library types – academic/medical/state/VA/corporate) Needs may differ depending on the type of disaster

27 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connecting with other Libraries Your Back-Up library agreement ◦ Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or Memorandum of Administrative Arrangements (MAA) ◦ Sample San Diego/Imperial County Libraries Disaster Response Network (SILDRN) Mutual Aid Agreement  Member participation  Member fees to pay for supplies  Disaster assistance ◦ Corporate compliance requirements

28 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connecting with other Libraries Recovery Cooperation ◦ Set up “buddy repository system” ◦ Form cooperative supply stockpiles ◦ Share staff and expertise ◦ Build on models of successful networks

29 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connecting with other Libraries Communication ◦ lists  National (ALA, MLA, SLA, NLM, and the NIH DISASTER-OUTREACH-LIB)  Regional (GMRLIST) ◦ Regional Coordinator ◦ Dev-ROKS (the NN/LM Office)

30 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connections in the Community Build Relationships with First Responders ◦ Connect with  Local Fire and Police Department  Local Public Health Department  City/County Emergency Medical Services  Community Mental Health Centers  Medical Reserve Corps ◦ Participate in Disaster Scenarios

31 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connections in the Community Identify Your Local State/Federal Agency Representatives ◦ State Emergency Management Agencies/Offices ◦ Homeland Security Advisor (if different from above) ◦ National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

32 National Archives

33 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connections in the Community Access Training Opportunities ◦ Basic response procedures (CPR, First Aid) ◦ Emergency preparedness and salvage  Archival organizations – local chapter of Society of American Archivists (SAA):  Conservation organizations – American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Work (AIC): ◦ Disaster Information Specialist (in process)  Follow DISASTR-OUTREACH-LIB list

34 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connections in the Community Access Training Opportunities (cont.) ◦ Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) https://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/index.shtm ◦ FEMA Emergency Management Institute  Incident Command System (ICS)  National Incident Management System (NIMS)

35 NIMS Resource Center

36 US. Service Providers

37 Preparations Beyond the Library: Preparations Beyond the Library: Connections in the Community Access Training Opportunities (cont.) ◦ Some OCLC regional networks provide comprehensive disaster training ◦ Additional Disaster Training NN/LM EP

38 We’re Back - Now What? Salvage (Service of Continuity Steps 7-9) ◦ Inventory Control ◦ Services and Vendors ◦ Funding Share Lessons Learned

39 We’re Back - Now What? Inventory Control ◦ Purpose: keep track of materials removed for storage, treatment & restoration, or disposal  Vital for control & insurance purposes  Key to a timely & efficient recovery ◦ Methods of Inventory Control  Call number or main call number on box keyed to Inventory Control Sheet  Bar-coding on sheet ◦ Is this Inventory Control your Disaster plan?

40 We’re Back - Now What? Services and Vendors ◦ Make contact before disaster strikes: Pre- arranged contracts shorten delays in recovery ◦ Be familiar with a variety of vendors and their services ◦ Larger institutions may need multiple vendors ◦ Use local companies or cultural institutions where possible ◦ Use national vendors for specialized work

41 We’re Back - Now What? Services and Vendors ◦ Check references ◦ Avoid unnecessary procedures that could damage collections (fumigation, ozone treatment, etc.) ◦ Ensure security procedures (if necessary) ◦ Federal Library Information Center Committee (FLICC) Disaster Recovery Contract

42 We’re Back - Now What? Types of Vendors to Consider ◦ Commercial Salvage Options  Desiccant dehumidification  Blast-freezing  Vacuum freeze dry  Vacuum thermal drying [not for items of long-term value] ◦ Preservation Field Service Programs ◦ Additional needs: Cold storage, freezer space, carpet removal, shipping, supplies, building drying

43 We’re Back - Now What? Salvage of Damaged Collections ◦ Factors to consider:  Accessibility  Collection priorities  Severity of event  Insurance coverage  Financial/human resources  Time and materials schedules  Contract and performance specifications  Vendor qualifications

44 We’re Back - Now What? Salvage of Damaged Collections ◦ Working with Recovery Services  Be clear about the services you need; If unsure, ask for detailed explanations  Document with photos before contracted services start  Request a sample batch be processed before signing an agreement  Sign letter of agreement/contract that specifies treatments  Consult local/regional networks for assistance & recommendations

45 24/7 Assistance “Do You Have a Collections-Threatening Emergency? Call (978) , day or night, seven days a week. After Center hours, you will be referred to a second telephone number to reach a staff member. Please do NOT request disaster assistance via , since it is not monitored 24 hours a day. NEDCC staff members are available 24 hours a day to provide telephone advice when a disaster occurs. This service is provided at no charge thanks to a grant to NEDCC from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). This service does not normally include on-site assistance. Information provided includes advice on drying wet collections and dealing with damage from fire, pests, or mold. Referrals to commercial disaster recovery service providers experienced with library and archives collections can also be provided.” Text from NEDCC website

46 We’re Back - Now What? Questions to Ask Vendors ◦ Experience working with libraries/cultural institutions ◦ Quality control measures and guarantees/standards they follow ◦ Work on-site? Subcontract? ◦ Shipping/transportation arrangements ◦ Drying method /Other recovery services

47 We’re Back - Now What? More Questions to Ask Vendors ◦ Insurance coverage ◦ If free estimates/samples provided ◦ Will changed orders impact cost of bid? Questions when Salvage Needed ◦ Detailed list of services to be rendered ◦ Timeframe for completion of the work ◦ Necessary additional services

48 We’re Back - Now What? Funding ◦ Insurance  Self-insured  Actual cash value  Replacement cost ◦ Emergency grants ◦ Federal sources for funding

49 We’re Back - Now What? Share Lessons Learned ◦ Within your library ◦ NN\LM Toolkit:

50

51 Wrap-Up and Evaluation Thank you for Preparing


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