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Hazards in health and social care environments. What is the difference between a hazard and a risk? Hazard is the object that could potentially hurt someone.

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Presentation on theme: "Hazards in health and social care environments. What is the difference between a hazard and a risk? Hazard is the object that could potentially hurt someone."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hazards in health and social care environments

2 What is the difference between a hazard and a risk? Hazard is the object that could potentially hurt someone Risk is the harm it could do

3 The Health & Safety Executive suggests the following five-point process: 1. for Hazards 2.Decide who might be at harm, and how. 3.Evaluate the risks arising from the hazards and decide whether more should be done. For example in a nursery: Hazard – adult-size tables Risk – children might hurt themselves on the corners Level of risk to children – high Minimise risk – buy small tables designed for children Risk – adults could hurt themselves on the corners Level of risk to adults - low

4 4.Record your findings. – using an assessment form. This should show that: Checks have been made Hazards have been dealt with The number of people affected has been considered Precautions have been taken to reduce the risk. 5. Review your assessment from time to time and revise if necessary.

5 Hazards in care settings Hazards are all around you, but carefully managed they will do no harm. A safety audit in your chosen care setting will identify hazards and their associate risks and show how risks can be minimised.

6 Toys are not unsafe but can be the cause of some accidents for example: A toy intended for an older child is given to a younger child or a toy that has been left in the wrong place and people trip over them. Toys are involved in over 40,000 accidents each year (Royal Society for the prevention of Accidents, 2005). All toys bought in the UK must conform to the Toy Safety Regulations Toys

7 Hand washing – the most important way to prevent cross – infection is to wash your hands Wearing gloves will offer a protective barrier against infection. Protective Clothing must be worn when: o coming into contact with bodily fluids or wastes. o Disposing of waste. o Caring for someone who is being treated for an infection. o Changing soiled linen. Control of infectious diseases

8 EmployersEmployees UK laws put obligations on employers to ensure the health and safety of their employers. Employers must ensure: Employees also have responsibilities: Arrangements are made to ensure the health and safety of employees To take care of themselves and others who may be affected by what they do and what they fail to do. Equipment is safeTo cooperate with their employer in implementing health and safety regulations. Adequate health and safety training is providedNot to interfere with or misuse any equipment provided to meet health and safety requirements. The working environment does not put anyone at riskTo report any dangerous situations to the manager. A written safety policy is in place The workplace is kept in good condition Personal protective equipment, e.g. Gloves, overalls, uniforms, is provided free of charge to employees The workplace does not emit toxic fumes or dust.

9 Legislation covering particular hazards HazardRelevant legislation Rooms and outdoor areas that pose a riskHealth and Safety at Work Act 1974 Unsafe furnishingsHealth and Safety at Work Act 1974 Incorrect storage of chemicalsControl of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002 Inadequate control of infectious diseasesReporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995 FireFire Precautions (Workplace) Regulations 1997 Lack of security measuresManual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 Pollution of air and/ or waterControl of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002

10 Fire Precautions (Workplace) Regulations 1997 BUILDING EVACUATION PROCEDURES IN THE EVENT OF FIRE OR BOMB ALERT: Raising the alarm On hearing the alarm: Staff in senior positions proceed to control point All other staff: Close windows and doors etc Assist able colleagues Check the locality is clear Assembly points DO NOT re-enter the building until you are told it is safe to do so.

11 Fire Precautions Never ignore smoke or smell of burning Go to the agreed assembly point so that someone knows you are out of the building Do not use lifts to evacuate Store flammable products appropriately Know where fire-fighting equipment is kept Do not panic Know the evacuation procedure Do not overload electrical appliances Ensure you know which patients are in your care

12 Poor lifting techniques result in many thousands of lost working hours due to injury. The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) has set out guidelines to follow to avoid muscular and skeletal injury. Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992

13 Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995 Information provided to the HSE can be used to perform risk assessments. Every workplace should have an accident report form.

14 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002 The law is designed to ensure that employers control exposure to hazardous substances in the workplace. A member from the workplace should be responsible for implementing the guidelines of COSHH

15 Methods of disposal of waste Type of wasteMethod of disposal Clinical waste, e.g. Used wound dressings, bandages, nappies, sanitary dressings, soiled gloves Yellow bag – when the bag is full, carefully seal and tag it indicating where the waste has come from, e.g. Labour ward, paediatrics, accident and emergency. This waste is burnt in an incinerator. Sharps, e.g. Needles, glass, syringesYellow sharps box – when the box is full, seal and tag it indicating location of box. Body fluids, e.g. vomit, urine, faeces, blood, sputum Wash down the sluice drain, and disinfect. Dirty and soiled sheets and linenRed bag – seal and send to the laundry (the bag will disintegrate in the wash) Recyclable instruments and equipment for sterilisation Blue bag – seal and return to central sterilisation services department (CSSD) for cleaning, sterilising and repacking. Waste paperBlack bag – seal and tag for incineration or shredding of confidential information.


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