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HOW TO ENRICH MY CHILD’S LIFE FOR TRANSITION TO PRIMARY SCHOOL SWATI POPAT VATS.

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Presentation on theme: "HOW TO ENRICH MY CHILD’S LIFE FOR TRANSITION TO PRIMARY SCHOOL SWATI POPAT VATS."— Presentation transcript:

1 HOW TO ENRICH MY CHILD’S LIFE FOR TRANSITION TO PRIMARY SCHOOL SWATI POPAT VATS

2  If I had my child, to raise all over again, I’d finger paint more and point the finger less.  I’d do less correcting and more connecting.  I’d take my eyes off the watch and watch with my eyes.  I would care to know less and know to care more.  I would be firm less often and affirm much more.  I would build self-esteem first and the house later…. A Thought that inspires the Journey of Parenting:

3 AS YOUR CHILD TRANSITS TO HIGH SCHOOL HE WILL NEED AND DEPEND ON THE EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS OF THE PREFRONTOL LOBE IN THE BRAIN What are you doing to help it develop?

4 Enrich your child’s life by ensuring that the child can use the executive functions of the brain……which are these functions?

5 The executive functions of the brain Focus And Self Control Perspective Taking Communication Cognitive flexibility Inhibition Ability to defer gratification Estimating time Working memory

6 Promote communication Learn to identify ways to communicate with your kids Learn to identify ways to communicate with your kids Don’t drone Don’t drone Have eye contact Have eye contact Understand ‘hovering’ Understand ‘hovering’ Understand ‘pull for attention’ Understand ‘pull for attention’ Pay attention Pay attention Ask specific queries Ask specific queries

7 Promote Focus- Play Games That Require Children To Pay Attention. Play Games That Require Children To Pay Attention. I spy I spy Puzzles Puzzles Red light – green light Red light – green light Musical chairs Musical chairs Bell game Bell game

8 Promote Cognitive Flexibility  Have Children Play Sorting Games With Changing Rules.  Encourage Children To Pretend And To Make Up Pretend Stories.  Give Children Puzzles.

9 Promote Working Memory- Play Games That Have Rules. Play Games That Have Rules. Have Children Make Plans, Follow The Plans, And Then Discuss What They Accomplished. Have Children Make Plans, Follow The Plans, And Then Discuss What They Accomplished.

10 Promote Inhibitory Control-  Play Games Where Children Can’t Go On Automatic Pilot.  Peg-Tapping Game. In the Peg-tapping game, children are supposed to do the opposite of what you do.  Day-Night Task. When shown a picture of a black background with a yellow moon and stars, children are supposed to say ‘day’ etc.  “Simon Says, Do the Opposite.”

11 Promote Inhibitory Control-  Select Computer Games Carefully.  Hearts and flowers  Flanker tasks, such as Feed the Fish. incorporates a technique called the Eriksen flanker task. There’s a big fish in the middle of the computer screen. The task is to feed this fish. If the fish is pointing right, children need to press the right-hand button to feed the fish etc.

12 Promote Perspective taking  Why is it important in children?  Helps make sense of own and others experiences  Better adjustment to school  Helps them understand what teachers want and expect.  Helps in learning to read

13 Games for perspective taking  Role play games  Drama  Play games of changing roles

14 Attention Deficit Disorders And Executive Functions Of The Brain There are three kinds of ADHD— attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 1.There’s ADHD of the hyperactive type; 2.There’s ADHD of the inattentive type; 3.And there’s a combined type of ADHD.

15 The above points are from the book- ‘Mind in the Making’ For more details - Ellen Galinsky - Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs. She groups this research into seven "essential life skills":Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs Focus and self control Perspective taking Communicating Making connections Critical thinking Taking on challenges Self-directed, engaged learning

16 Attention Deficit Disorders And Executive Functions Of The Brain Inhibition: is the ability to avoid distractions and stop themselves. This can be tested by a ‘stop task,’ Children with ADHD are most likely to need the stop signal to occur earlier in the process for them to be able to stop themselves. Ability to defer gratification: Children with ADHD may be more likely to choose an immediate reward over a reward that will happen later, even when the delayed reward is a bigger or better reward. Estimating time: People of all ages with ADHD are likely to be less accurate in estimating how long things will take. Working memory: Children who have the inattentive form of ADHD have a harder time holding different things in their memory at the same time.

17 What makes children misbehave? Embarrassment. Overbearing and insensitive adult Unrealistic deadlines. Family argument prior to school. Bully in school/bus/play area. Impatient adult Inability to complete a task that is too difficult.

18 The transition to primary school  Transitions tend to be some of the most difficult and stressful moments in the life of a child. At these times teachers and parents often find themselves dealing with more challenging behaviors and feeling more like police officers than nurturing caregivers.

19 'six steps to conflict resolution' 1. Approach the situation calmly 2.Recognize the children’s feelings 3.Gather information and restate the problem 4.Ask for ideas / solutions 5.Retell any suggested solution 6.Support children to act oh their decision

20 What is an effective transition? Effective transition is when children…….  Understand ‘what is coming’ ahead of time.  Have some experience of the new environment and the people in it.  Feel safe, secure and valued in their new school.  Know that staff at school will listen to them and respect what they say  Understand what is expected of them (learning behavior) in school  Know what they should/shouldn’t bring into school.  Enjoy the experience of moving to the ‘big school’.  Feel that they have a measure of control over the process

21 Why do problems arise with transition? Problems can occur during transition for a variety of reasons : For instance:

22  The children might be unsettled or upset about the move from one setting to another.  The children may have developed very close relationships with both staff and children in Jumbo Kids. They will miss them!  There’s a very different ratio of adults to children in a primary class than there is in an Early years setting, meaning it is almost impossible for the children to get as much individual adult attention.  Behaviour issues may surface, particularly in those children who are confused by the change.  Progress in learning and development can slow down while the child adapts to the school setting.  children will have to depend on their independent skills for accessing toilet, looking after their bags and themselves.  There will be a jump in the learning content in the primary years

23 How will we help your child?  Your child will visit a primary classroom in the next month  Teachers will talk to them and help them become independent  Children will continue with three line format in standard one and two  Primary teachers will come to observe Sr.kg class  More emphasis on Copying from the blackboard and reading in sr.kg  More worksheets in the first few months in primary

24 In everything you do as a parent, remember that …….. Only you can enrich your child’s journey to primary school. All the best.


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