Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

School Climate Programs: Strategies and Challenges in Implementation James Caldwell, M.Ed, LPC

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "School Climate Programs: Strategies and Challenges in Implementation James Caldwell, M.Ed, LPC"— Presentation transcript:

1 School Climate Programs: Strategies and Challenges in Implementation James Caldwell, M.Ed, LPC

2 Intensive Interventions Dillon, J., (2012). No Place For Bullying: Leadership for Schools That Care for Every Student. Thousand Oaks, California. Sage Publications. Bullying Prevention Policy/Program School Climate Promoting Autonomy, Belonging, Competency Staff and Students develop a positive, trusting climate which promotes a caring, productive sense of Community Three Tools of Comprehensive Bullying Prevention

3 SCHOOL CLIMATE COMMITTEE Staff & Students StudentsParents Clubs & Organizations NHS Watch D.O.G.S. High School “The Bridge” La Visión PTA/ PTO One Voice Fine Arts Isolated/ Friendless Students StuCo Rachel’s Challenge Athletics DECA Staff Elementary & Middle School Olweus Committee PAL’s Teen Leadership The School Climate Committee is made up of representatives from school groups, clubs and organizations. These representatives are to include: One adult and two students (male/female) from each group/organization, at least one Assistant Principal and Counselor and be overseen by the Principal (or an appointed/elected staff member). Students who feel isolated and friendless will also be encouraged to join the committee.

4 District Vision  The School Ambassadors, along with caring adults, will develop proactive strategies to create a learning community where:  peer mistreatment is not tolerated  bullying/Peer Mistreatment is not seen as “normal” behavior  we don’t blame the targets of students who are bullied/mistreated for their mistreatment  students are accepted regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, cultural background, physical appearance, socio-economic status or academic achievement  reporting peer abuse, potential self harm and other dangerous issues to adults is the norm  bystanders stand up in the face of injustice  healthy lifestyles and academic success are encouraged and expected by all  The goal is to produce a sense of community where all students feel safe, connected and valued.

5 Lacks Vision Vision

6 “The power that individuals have to make a difference isn’t in working individually but in mobilizing people of like mind to come together as one” - Ben Rattray Founder/CEO change.org

7 Strategies to develop a more bullying prevention friendly mindset  Share statistics…especially from your own school  Link Academic success to Maslow’s Hierarchy  Change the language  Have students make presentations to the staff and peers  Have administrators who “get it” speak with the school staff and other administrators who don’t  Use strategies to help staff relate/empathize with the effects of bullying (especially experiential strategies)  Compare to parallels in their own life (ie. Feelings of injustice, how stress affects your ability to do your job, a time you felt left out, or give examples of how you can just suddenly change)  Think back on personal experiences with bullying

8 Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs College State Testing Grades Capable Connected Cared For

9 Strategies to develop a more bullying prevention friendly mindset  Share statistics…especially from your own school  Link Academic success to Maslow’s Hierarchy  Change the language  Victim…………………………Student who was bullied  Bully……………………………Student who bullied  Incident is deserved………Incident is understandable  Sensitive……………………..Vulnerable  Tolerance…………………….Acceptance  Misbehavior………………...Misguided attempt at solving a problem  He had it coming…………..It’s going to be hard to protect him when he does that

10 Strategies to develop a more bullying prevention friendly mindset  Share statistics…especially from your own school  Link academic success to Maslow’s Hierarchy  Change the language  Have students make presentations to the staff  Have administrators who “get it” speak with the school staff and other administrators who don’t  Use strategies to help staff relate/empathize with the effects of bullying (especially experiential strategies)  Compare to parallels in their own life (ie. Feelings of injustice, how stress affects your ability to do your job, a time you felt left out, or give examples of how you can just suddenly change)  Think back on personal experiences with bullying

11 Feeling Overwhelmed?  I Love Lucy – Chocolate Factory - Discuss things at work and home that stress you out - Discuss how this stress affects your ability to do your work at school and your role at home as a mother/father/wife/husband, etc. - Each person in the group describe something you do to manage stress

12 Strategies for Implementing Your Program District Wide  Obtain Administrative support  Meet with Bullying Prevention Site Coordinators and key stakeholders on a regular basis  Keep prevention efforts at the forefront by holding regular meetings with students and staff  Classroom Meetings  Staff Discussion Groups  Make it as easy to implement as possible  Combine prevention efforts and focus on connectedness

13 Combining Prevention Efforts  Many activities designed to prevent violence, bullying, and the abuse of alcohol and other drugs may also reduce suicide risk among students (Epstein & Spirito, 2009).  Programs that improve school climate and promote connectedness help reduce risk of suicide, violence, bullying, and substance abuse (Resnick et al., 1997; Blum, McNeely, & Rinehart, 2002).

14 Adolescents who feel connected to school have better academic outcomes and …  Enjoy school more  Better school attendance  Higher academic performance  Higher graduation rates Source: Engaging Schools: Fostering High School Students’ Motivation to Learn, National Research Council, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, 2004.

15 …and better health outcomes Adolescents who feel connected to their school…  Have fewer behavioral problems  Are less likely to:  use drugs or alcohol  Bully or be bullied  self harm or have suicidal thoughts  exhibit disruptive or violent behavior or carry a weapon  engage in early sexual behavior  Are more likely to experience emotional health and well-being and have a commitment to do well/achieve (invest in school) By high school 40-60% of students report feeling “disconnected” from their school (Klemm and Connell, 2004).

16 Strategies for Implementing Your Program District Wide  Obtain Administrative support  Meet with Bullying Prevention Site Coordinators and key stakeholders on a regular basis  Keep prevention efforts at the forefront by holding regular meetings with students and staff  Classroom Meetings  Staff Discussion Groups  Make it as easy to implement as possible  Combine prevention efforts and focus on connectedness  Advertise prevention efforts throughout the community  Use student leaders to assist in prevention efforts

17 “Be the change you wish to see in the world” - Mahatma Ghandi

18 Bibliography Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. School Connectedness: Strategies for Increasing Protective Factors Among Youth. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Dillon, J., (2012). No Place For Bullying: Leadership for Schools That Care for Every Student. Thousand Oaks, California. Sage Publications Engaging Schools: Fostering High School Students’ Motivation to Learn, National Research Council, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Epstein JA, Spirito A, (2009). Risk Factors for suicidality among high school students. Jun;39(3): doi: /suli Maslow, A. H. (1943). A Theory of Human Motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), A Theory of Human Motivation Prochaska JO and DiClemente CC ( 1984 ). The Transtheoretical Approach: Towards a Systematic Eclectic Framework. Dow Jones Irwin, Homewood, IL, USA Rattray, Ben, (n.d.). [team member paragraph], retrieved from


Download ppt "School Climate Programs: Strategies and Challenges in Implementation James Caldwell, M.Ed, LPC"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google