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Healthy Kids, Successful Learners Appoquinimink School District Wellness Policy 2011-2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Healthy Kids, Successful Learners Appoquinimink School District Wellness Policy 2011-2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Healthy Kids, Successful Learners Appoquinimink School District Wellness Policy

2 2 Our Wellness Policy Why do we have it? What does it say? How are we implementing it? How can I find out more/get involved?

3 3 Why do we have a wellness policy? Healthy Kids are Better Learners Research strongly supports that healthy, fit kids: –Have better behavior; –Are more focused and on-task; and –Achieve higher standardized test scores

4 4 Why do we have a wellness policy? However…. Data show that a large number of children in Delaware (and the nation) are not healthy and fit –Childhood obesity rates are alarming –Fitness levels are not good –Eating habits are poor In 2004, federal law required each LEA to have a Wellness Policy –New requirements are outlined in the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010

5 5 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

6 6 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

7 7 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

8 8 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

9 9 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%

10 10 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%

11 11 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% 30%

12 12 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% 30%

13 13 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4 person) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% 30%

14 14 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% 30%

15 15 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2009 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% 30%

16 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990, 1999, 2009 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 54 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% 30%

17 17 Obesity: A National Epidemic Among Children, Too

18 18 In Delaware, approximately 40% of children and youth have an unhealthy weight. 1 Impact on Delawares economy: $207 million in medical expenditures yearly, according to a study in Obesity Research² Delaware Survey of Childrens Health: Nemours's Health and Prevention Services. 2. Finkelstein, EA, Fiebelkorn, I.C. and Wang G. State-level estimates of annual medical expenditures attributable to obesity. Obesity Research 2004; 12: Childhood Obesity: The Delaware Story

19 19 Obesity: A National Epidemic Among Children, Too The health consequences of obesity are profound. type 2 diabetes high blood pressure abnormal cholesterol asthma certain types of cancers anxiety depression fatty liver disease sleep apnea Source:

20 20 The CDC predicts that our current generation of children may be the first ever to have a shorter lifespan than their parents. Obesity: A National Epidemic Among Children, Too Source:

21 21 Why do we have a Wellness Policy? To address these disturbing health trends To acknowledge the impact of health on learning To meet federal requirements –In 2004, federal law required each LEA to have a Wellness Policy –New requirements are outlined in the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010

22 22 What is in Appoquiniminks Wellness Policy? Goals for Nutrition Education Standards for Food Served Goals for Physical Activity * To read the full policy and wellness plan, please contact [insert name]

23 23 Educate and train teachers Integration of nutrition education into the curriculum Promote nutrition awareness School-based marketing is consistent with nutrition education and health promotion Prohibit school-based marketing of brands promoting low nutrient foods and beverages. Wellness Policy Goals for Nutrition Education:

24 24 All meals served in the cafeteria will meet nutrient standards Foods of minimal nutritional value will not be served, sold or given out anywhere on school property before the end of the school day. Students will be provided with and encouraged to consume healthy and nutritious food that includes whole grains and fiber rich vegetables and fruits. Healthy eating will be encouraged through nutrition education. Wellness Policy Goals for Nutrition Standards

25 25 Lunch should be served as near the middle of the school day as possible Drinking water is available for students Students should be encouraged to wash their hands before eating. Meals and snacks will not be used as rewards or punishment. Fundraisers should promote positive health habits. Encourage students to start each day with a healthy breakfast. Wellness Policy Goals for Nutrition Standards:

26 26 All students should receive a quality physical education program. Students will not be excluded from participating in PE for unrelated disciplinary action. Nutrition education is integrated into the PE curriculum. Provide unique opportunities for physical activity during the day. Loss of recess cannot be used as a punishment for unrelated disciplinary action. Staff wellness should be available to all employees. Wellness Policy Goals for Physical Activity:

27 27 How are we implementing it? A district Wellness Committee meets regularly to develop and implement an action plan Information is shared with schools via a building liaison

28 28 ASD Wellness Policy goals for School Year: 1.Elementary students will achieve at least 150 minutes of physical activity per week. 2.All school nutrition managers will establish meaningful wellness/nutrition education goals for their building. 3.Provide opportunities to support staff in achieving 150 minutes of physical activity per week 4.Communicate with all staff, families, and the community on the specifics of the District Wellness Policy and Plan.

29 29 How can I learn more or get involved? Contact your building liaison Contact a committee member: Chairs: Debbie Panchisin, Janice VanderDecker & Kittie Rehrig ASD Committee Members: Barb Bobik, Betsy Cycyk, Matt Fallis, Rebecca Feathers, Jenny Gibeault, Linda Johnson, Ray Gravuer Community Members: Joanne Christine - Board, Elizabeth Walker – parent, Linda Tholstrup - Nemours

30 30 Together, we can help our students become Healthy, Successful Learners. You cannot educate a child who is not healthy, and you cannot keep a child healthy who is not educated. Dr. Jocelyn Elder Former U.S. Surgeon General


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