Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

An Introduction to the Merritt Curation Repository University of California Curation Center Team California Digital Library June 9, 2011 UC3 Summer Webinar.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "An Introduction to the Merritt Curation Repository University of California Curation Center Team California Digital Library June 9, 2011 UC3 Summer Webinar."— Presentation transcript:

1 An Introduction to the Merritt Curation Repository University of California Curation Center Team California Digital Library June 9, 2011 UC3 Summer Webinar Series

2 First, a word about the webinar series… A forum for timely topics of interest to the UC community – Highlighting projects, services, and developments in the areas of digital preservation, web archiving, and data curation – Intended to raise awareness of issues, and provide information on useful resources and services available to the UC community – 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month, and as scheduled, featuring UC3 staff and UC librarians, content managers, and technologists Teleconference+1 (866) , access code # Webconferencehttp://bit.ly/jdjMAPhttp://bit.ly/jdjMAP Teleconference+1 (866) , access code # Webconferencehttp://bit.ly/jdjMAPhttp://bit.ly/jdjMAP

3 First, a word about the webinar series… Some logistics… – Participant phones will be muted during the formal presentation, but we will be monitoring the online chat – Slides, Q & A, and web and voice recordings will be posted after each presentation – Schedule available at – Please suggest additional topics! – Take the short survey

4 Now on with the show… Today’s topic is an introduction to the Merritt curation repository – Who is it for? – What can it do? – Why use it? – What does it cost? – Next steps? – Q & A

5 What keeps you up at night? Are there standards or best practices I should be aware of? How much will it cost? How can I transfer my content to an appropriate curation environment How do I know my content is safe? What’s the best strategy to ensure permanent availability? Do I need to create new derivatives just for preservation purposes? How can I get a persistent reference to my content? What if my content needs to evolve over time? Can I control who can see my content? I have a good discovery platform; how can I add preservation services?

6 “There’s an app for that” Are there standards or best practices I should be aware of? How much will it cost? How can I transfer my content to an appropriate curation environment How do I know my content is safe? What’s the best strategy to ensure permanent availability? Do I need to create new derivatives just for preservation purposes? How can I get a persistent reference to my content? What if my content needs to evolve over time? Can I control who can see my content? I have a good discovery platform; how can I add preservation services? Automatic replication and high-availability redundancy Periodic fixity audit Simple submission UI/API METS “feeder” duplicates existing DPR workflow Simple submission UI/API METS “feeder” duplicates existing DPR workflow Model free No packaging, format, or metadata requirements Model free No packaging, format, or metadata requirements Strongly versioned Integration with EZID and DataCite Curator-defined access control rules Modular micro- services “toolkit” UC3 consultation Storage at $1.04/GB/year

7 Merritt repository Merritt is available for use by all members of the UC community – Libraries/archives/museums – ORU/MRUs – Faculty/staff Centrally hosted by UC3/CDL on behalf of the UC community – Economies of scale – Shared experience and expertise Mediated through campus libraries

8 Modes of use: dark archive Pro-active preservation, but no expectation of direct end user access – Legacy DPR content contributed by campus libraries – Cultural heritage texts, master images, sound, moving image, data sets – All DPR content will be automatically migrated to Merritt

9 Modes of use: bright archive Provide preservation and end user access – NIH Healthy Pathways project on bio-demographics Multi-institutional: UC Davis, University of Colorado, University of Virginia, Syddansk University (Denmark) Need to restrict access to project partners initially, with eventual public access

10 Modes of use: bright archive Content discovery: search

11 Modes of use: bright archive Content discovery: search

12 Modes of use: bright archive Content discovery: browse

13 Modes of use: bright archive Content discovery: browse

14 Modes of use: preservation “back end” Preservation only; content discovery/delivery provided by well-known external systems – Using direct hooks into Merritt to retrieve content – eScholarship Open access publishing – Open Context Archaeological data publishing – Investigating integration with Islandora/Drupal and Alfresco

15 Modes of use: distributed data grids DataONE “Enable new science and knowledge creation through universal access to data about life on earth and the environment that sustains it”

16 More information Online help FAQ User’s guide UC3 contact

17 Merritt cost model UC3 provides technical infrastructure, data center hosting, staff, monitoring, maintenance, enhancements, help, outreach, consultation, etc. Contributors are charged only for storage used, at the UC3 recovery rate of $1.04/GB/year Developing an “endowment” model: Pay once, preserve forever Will soon extend model for non-UC contributors How does this compare? Cost of a physical book in RLF † $ 4.62/year Cost of a digital book in HathiTrust ‡ $ 0.15/year Cost of a digital book in Merritt$ 0.06/year How does this compare? Cost of a physical book in RLF † $ 4.62/year Cost of a digital book in HathiTrust ‡ $ 0.15/year Cost of a digital book in Merritt$ 0.06/year † Gary Lawrence (2007) Internal analysis, CDL; ‡ Paul Courant and Matthew Nielsen (2010), On the cost of keeping a book, HathiTrust.

18 Average collection sizes and costs CollectionObjectsSizeAnnual cost CA DOE reports 8, GB$ Cal Cultures GB$ eScholarship46, GB$ A “cost calculator” spreadsheet is available at A “cost calculator” spreadsheet is available at

19 Average ETD size and cost CampusETD titlesSizeAnnual cost Berkeley GB$ Davis GB$ Irvine GB$ 6.30 Los Angeles GB$ Riverside GB$ 3.10 San Diego GB$ 9.02 San Francisco * GB$ 9.05 Santa Barbara GB$ 5.25 Santa Cruz GB$ 2.50 Based on 2009 holdings in ProQuest * UCSF based on total ETD holdings in Merritt

20 Average research data size and cost Almost 50% of all research data is less than 1 GB Source: Science 331:6018 (February 11, 2011): SizePercentageAnnual cost < 1 GB48.3 %< $ – 100 GB32.0 % $ 1.04 – GB – 1 TB12.1 % $ – 1, > 1 TB 7.6 %> $ 1,040.00

21 Next steps UC3 is working with campus partners to determine ongoing development and collection priorities Annotation Notification Transformation Characterization Fixity / Linked data Replication IdM/Authn/Authz Ingest, Access Inventory, Queuing Storage and Identity Technology watch Metadata standards Policy and business model Data management guidelines Object and collection modeling New content acquisition

22 Next steps In production Model-free objects Submission via UI and API Persistent identifiers Format identification Version provenance Automated replication Automated fixity audit Role-based access control Collections Semantic index and search Object/version/file download In progress Simplified update Enhanced characterization (JHOVE2) Faceted search and browse (XTF) CMS/DAMS-like function (Islandora) In planning Simplified batch UCTrust integration Linked data Transformation Notification Annotation Support for NGTS/DLSTF recommendations We welcome your feedback on needs and priorities! We welcome your feedback on needs and priorities!

23 Simplified update Variant form of object update requiring the submission of only the changed components Client-side tools to simplify the creation of batch manifests #%checkm_0.7 #%profile | #%prefix | mrt: | #%prefix | nfo: | #%fields | nfo:fileUrl | nfo:hashAlgorithm | nfo:hash | m | md5 | #%eof #%checkm_0.7 #%profile | #%prefix | mrt: | #%prefix | nfo: | #%fields | nfo:fileUrl | nfo:hashAlgorithm | nfo:hash | m | md5 | #%eof

24 Enhanced characterization JHOVE2 next-generation framework for format- aware characterization – Automated extraction and inference of extensive technical metadata significant for preservation analysis and planning "Module": { "scope": "ICCModule“, "Header": { "scope": "ICCHeader“, "ProfileSize": { "unit": "byte“, "value": },"ProfileVersionNumber": " “,"ProfileDeviceClass_raw": "spac“,"ProfileDeviceClass_descriptive": "ColorSpace Conversion profile“,"ColourSpace_raw": "RGB “,"ColourSpace_descriptive": "rgbData“,"ProfileConnectionSpace_raw": "Lab “,"ProfileConnectionSpace_descriptive": "labData“

25 Enhanced discovery via XTF eXtensible Text Framework – CDL developed/supported open source discovery platform – Robust, scalable faceted search and browse

26 CMS/DAMS-like function Many campuses are looking for CMS/DAMS solutions Investigating integration with Islandora to provide a Drupal CMS/DAMS front-end to Merritt

27 Questions?

28 Upcoming webinars Date/timeTopic Wednesday, June 15 12:30 pm Data Sharing by Scientists: Practices and Perceptions Carol Tenopir, Univ. Tennessee Mike Frame, USGS Thursday, June 30 2:00 pm The Data Management Planning Tool (DMP Tool) Trisha Cruse, UC3 Thursday, July 14 2:00 pm Data as Publication John Kunze, UC3 Catherine Mitchell, CDL Publishing Program Thursday, July 28 2:00 pm Merritt: Depositing Content and Providing Access Thursday, August 11 2:00 pm DCXL (Data Curation Excel) Please take the webinar survey Please take the webinar survey

29 For more information UC Curation Center Stephen AbramsMargaret Low Lisa ColvinDavid Loy Patricia Cruse Mark Reyes Scott Fisher Tracy Seneca Erik Hetzner Joan Starr Greg Janée Marisa Strong John Kunze Perry Willett UC3 webinar series Merritt repository


Download ppt "An Introduction to the Merritt Curation Repository University of California Curation Center Team California Digital Library June 9, 2011 UC3 Summer Webinar."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google