Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Get Your ELLs in the Content Reading Game JESSICA JACOBS LUZERNE INTERMEDIATE UNIT 18 ELLKSRA.WIKISPACES.COM.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Get Your ELLs in the Content Reading Game JESSICA JACOBS LUZERNE INTERMEDIATE UNIT 18 ELLKSRA.WIKISPACES.COM."— Presentation transcript:

1 Get Your ELLs in the Content Reading Game JESSICA JACOBS LUZERNE INTERMEDIATE UNIT 18 ELLKSRA.WIKISPACES.COM

2 Please Do Now On you handout answer the following What do good readers do? Write a least 3 lines.

3 What Can A Teacher Do? Connect the new to the known ◦Existing knowledge ◦Background knowledge ◦Shared Knowledge Build reading habits Use formative assessment regularly Ask questions that require critical thinking Use graphic organizers

4 Effective Readers ◦Bring meaning to the text ◦Learn to Read and Read to Learn ◦Question the text and themselves as they monitor reading and meaning ◦Merge thinking and reading – make it personal ◦Create habits

5 ELLs Scaffolding Access Support Habits

6 Habits of the Mind All students understand what to do when reading. There are three easy steps that will eventually evolve into habits to move high school students toward deeper comprehension of complex informational and eliminate the “zombie read.” These steps will start the overwhelming process to implement and embrace the Common Core Literacy Standards. 6

7 7 Habits of the Mind Actively Read & Re- read Set Purpose Make Notes/Share Notes ACTIVE READING CRITICAL THINKING CLOSE READING

8 Habits of the Mind Actively Read & Re-Read the Text All students need to be taught why it is necessary to re-read texts and be held accountable for re- reading the texts (Lee & Spratley, 2010). Content teachers should know and reflect on what the best, intuitive readers do when faced with a challenging text. ◦Re-read and monitor to investigate vocabulary and form connections until the meaning is complete and they can move on to the rest of the text (Fang & Wei, 2010). When students develop the re-reading habit, the mind can move beyond a surface comprehension to a close reading of a text. 8

9 Habits of the Mind Set a Purpose In direct relationship with re-reading, setting a purpose allows for comprehension (Lee & Spratley, 2010). The teacher reflects on what the students are to know or do as a result from reading this text and how to activate students’ prior knowledge. ◦The teachers can assign an initial read, called a “soft read” of the text. This enables all students to read through the text on a low-risk level, activate prior knowledge, examine the structure, and invest in the text (Akhondi, Malayeri,& Samad, 2011). The teacher may ask the students to read the text and make a connection, form questions, or examine vocabulary (Wetzels, Kester, van Merrienboer, & Broers, 2011). 9

10 Habits of the Mind Set a Purpose Reset the purpose with the Common Core literacy standards ◦Key ideas and details, ◦Craft and structure ◦Integration of knowledge and ideas. Teaching students to focus and read with purpose creates an opportunity for the teacher to teach upon, and, eventually, students may independently read and re-read a text three or more times to uncover the true meaning within the text (Lee & Spratley, 2010). 10

11 Habits of the Mind Make Notes – Share Notes When teachers have students reading and re-reading with a set purpose, students now have reason to make notes from the text (Kobayashi, 2009). Teachers require the students to read with a pen/pencil in hand and make notes from the text resulting in students showing what was read. Reading now becomes a visual and accountable process informing the teacher if the students read the text with the new purpose and if they understood the intent of the text. The notes generated can be a formative assessment allowing the teacher to fill in gaps and make connections to the upcoming lesson (Lee & Spratley, 2010; Smith, Holiday & Austin, 2009). 11

12 Habits of the Mind 12 Make Notes – Share Notes When teachers have students reading and re-reading with a set purpose, students now have reason to make notes from the text (Kobayashi, 2009). Teachers require the students to read with a pen/pencil in hand and make notes from the text resulting in students showing what was read. Reading now becomes a visual and accountable process informing the teacher if the students read the text with the new purpose and if they understood the intent of the text. The notes generated can be a formative assessment allowing the teacher to fill in gaps and make connections to the upcoming lesson (Lee & Spratley, 2010; Smith, Holiday, & Austin, 2009).

13 Habits of the Mind What do the “Habits of the mind” look like for ELLs? ◦Visual literacy, or the ability to evaluate, apply, or create conceptual visual representation, is relatively independent of language, and is therefore invaluable to learning content and English simultaneously SEE, THINK, WONDER ◦What do you see? ◦What do you think is going on? ◦What does it make you wonder? 13

14 What do you see? What do you think is going on? What does it make you wonder? Adapted from: Ritchhart, R., Church, M., & Morrison, K. (2011). Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

15 Whole-part- whole

16 Whole – Part – Whole Extend Re-Read Question the Author Read Between the Lines

17

18

19

20

21

22 Daniels, H., & Steineke, N. (2011). Texts and lessons for content-area reading. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Student Example

23 How can we connect this to other content areas? What would a scaffold on this activity look like? Can all learners benefit from this exercise ?

24 Text Structure Textbook features intended to aid student understanding may have the opposite result for students who do not know how to use bolded words, headings, sidebars, and graphs. Many ELLs with weak literacy skills have difficulty tracking the flow of information on cluttered pages. The textbook is a tool. Take time for students to understand what the tool is and how it functions. ◦Structure ◦Picture Walks

25 Take a Tour of the Text

26

27

28 Urban Areas Increase in Population Jobs Entertainment Education

29 Why? Help students identify most and least important information.

30 Visual Literacy Character Analysis Builds Background Knowledge Creates Personal Connections Builds Efficacy Creates Habits Connects new to know Critical thinking Active Learning

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38 Add more meaning with a combination of pictures and quotes:

39

40

41 How can this be applied to other content areas? For Non-Fiction? Historical Events Historical Figures

42 Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs

43

44 Vocabulary Connections

45 Shades of Meaning

46 Frayer Model

47 Cinquains

48 How can we use the strategies in our content areas?

49 Get to know your students Getting to Know You Folders Bio Poems I Am activities Brown Bag

50 Chalk Talk

51 Jessica Jacobs ELLKSRA.wikispaces.com


Download ppt "Get Your ELLs in the Content Reading Game JESSICA JACOBS LUZERNE INTERMEDIATE UNIT 18 ELLKSRA.WIKISPACES.COM."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google