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Wind Business, Energy & the Environment: Fighting the Good Fight Frank Maisano Bracewell & Giuliani LLP Strategic Communications.

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Presentation on theme: "Wind Business, Energy & the Environment: Fighting the Good Fight Frank Maisano Bracewell & Giuliani LLP Strategic Communications."— Presentation transcript:

1 Wind Business, Energy & the Environment: Fighting the Good Fight Frank Maisano Bracewell & Giuliani LLP Strategic Communications

2 Wind Which Claims are made about the project? –Its emissions will be too high. –It will impact wildlife. EASY…..Right???? Project Siting Quiz: Coal vs. Wind

3 Wind Now a little harder…… –It will harm our community –It wont make a difference Could be either…… Project Siting Quiz: Coal vs. Wind

4 Wind Final Test…. –Property values will go down –It will make residents sick –Somebody is getting rich at our expense Project Siting Quiz: Coal vs. Wind

5 Wind Moral of this quiz: IT DOESNT MATTER WHAT YOU BUILD, SOME ONE WILL BE OPPOSED TO IT Project Siting Quiz: Coal vs. Wind

6 Why Wind in VA? Wind Power Is Clean Wind Power Is Reliable The New Energy Opportunity

7 At Home in the Mountains Windpower On the Farm On the Coast

8 Wind Wind Farm Benefits Clean air Clean water A healthier environment Domestic source of fuel No external fuel cost

9 Wind 9 Excellent payments to landowners Large tax revenues Wind Farm Benefits To Local Communities Local construction jobs Full-time jobs in Operations and Maintenance Opportunities for New Tourism

10 Wind Wind Works Wind-derived energy is nonpolluting and it improves air and water quality Wind projects are safe for community residents Properly sited and constructed wind farms can coexist with wildlife Wind farms work well with existing rural land uses –Use small portions of the land –Do not change the existing primary use of the land The Mid-Atlantic area has varying but maturing support for wind farms; encouragement is growing. –Pennsylvania –Maryland –West Virginia –Virginia The Mid-Atlantic presents a good long-term opportunity for wind, given adequate wind resources and access to a strong liquid electricity market The areas of most interest are properties with fair wind resources and proximity to transmission lines

11 Wind 11 Market Drivers Why the Mid-Atlantic Needs Wind Power Increasing cost of energy – older coal plants, expiring of nuclear plant licenses. New clean coal plants will be much more expensive Increasing demand for power – usage rising at a rate of 1+% per year Up to 25% Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation Available wind resource Demand for locally produced energy The Mid-Atlantic is one of the largest producers of greenhouse gases in the world - it needs to help with solutions Future carbon emission reductions will be required. Wind is a zero emission energy

12 Wind 12 Mid-Atlantic (PJM) Transmission Area Fuel Mix PJM Transmission Area

13 Wind 13 Energy Picture In Virginia 2005 Figure 1. Electrical power generation in Virginia, Total = 78,943,045 megawatt-hours Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration/State Electricity Profiles 2005, Table 5.

14 Cost of Energy ($/MWh) According to Recent Reports Notes: CCS: Carbon Capture and Storage, PC: Primary Combustion, IGCC: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, CC: Combined Cycle Sources: DOE/NTEL. Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants.. Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity Final Report. DOE/NETL-2007/1281. May Standard & Poors. Which Power Generation Technologies Will Take the Lead in Response to Carbon Controls? May On T Drive, POLICY/!general info/CostofEnergy_June2007

15 Wind 15 County and Local Government Bipartisan support Majority of governments excited about this type of economic benefits State Government Bipartisan support in most executive and state houses. Strongly supported in most legislature on a bipartisan basis Federal Government Bipartisan Executive and Congressional Branches of government support President and Vice President have publicly talked about, encouraged development, and signed legislation Public In national polls wind farms were supported by voters 87% Political Support

16 Wind 16 Who Else Is Encouraging and Supporting Wind Power A Wide range of groups support wind power Conservationists Environmental Groups Labor Unions Local Community Officials Regional Grid Power Planners

17 Wind 17 Industry Growth Important Operational Benefits Very low operating costs Flat wholesale pricing for 10 to 20 years Wind is a NO risk fuel supply Hedge against gas/oil and now rising coal price volatility Increased energy diversity More electrical supply competition No carbon sequestering costs No long-term nuclear waste storage costs

18 Wind 18

19 Mid-Atlantic Wind Maps Wind In The 4-5 Power Class Is Commercially Viable Now

20 Dark Green is Minimum Required Wind Speed

21 Wind 21 Wind Farm Benefits to Landowners A wind farm can supply excellent additional cash flow and increased land value through guaranteed lease payments and a percentage of the gross electrical revenue generated on the landowners site Lease payments are long term, steady and predictable Wind farms can co-exist with existing rural land uses –No pollution –Uses small portions of the land –Does not change the existing primary use and revenue stream from the land Wind development improves the yield on the landholdings, avoiding ups/downs of business cycles Wind farms can help to improve landholders image by supporting a clean renewable energy source for the electrical grid Landholders can associate themselves with a clean environment by improved air and water quality Revenues paid to the communities by the wind farm improve community relations for the landowner Wind is an exceptional opportunity to enhance the future value of your existing land

22 Wind 22

23 Wind 23 How We Avoid Impacts Reduce Soil DisturbanceDetailed Topographic Mapping Reduce ClearingVegetation Cover Type Mapping Reduce Habitat ClearingWildlife Habitat and Wetlands Assessment Avoid Effects on Sensitive SpeciesRare, Threatened and Endangered Species Studies Reduce Potential Impacts to Birds and Bats Bird and Bat Migration and Habitat Studies (Visual, Radar and Acoustical) Avoid Disturbing NeighborsNoise and Visual Impact Assessment Ensure Public SafetyIce Shedding Analysis Minimize Effects on Cultural ResourcesHistorical and Archaeological Resource Assessments Maintain Water QualitySediment / Erosion Control Plan and Storm water Management Plan

24 Wind 24 Per/Turbine Land Usage After Construction After Construction, Land Available for Landowner Use, Except: Aprox Sq. Ft. (.06 Acres) For Tower and Parking Area Road and Power Line Easements Wide Access Road* After Construction *Whenever possible, UPC utilizes preexisting roads rather than constructing new roads. Land Usage During Construction and Major Maintenance Up to 100 Wide Equipment Access (30-35 Crane Road and Typically 50 to 60 Total Width With Drainage, Cuts etc…) Aprox. 1-3/4 Acres Area for Each 50 x 50 Foundation Excavation Typical Total Land Usage Is Approximately 2-3 Acres Per Turbine.

25 Wind 25 Economic Benefits 50 MW Pennsylvania Project Economic investment in the project before financing 2-3 million dollars 3- 5 high skill full-time jobs once operational Hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal, state & local tax revenues annually. Millions over the life of the wind farm. Annual lease payments to landowners 50 – 75 jobs during construction Million in materials and services sourced from state companies Local businesses benefit from increased activity during construction phase of project

26 Wind Dominion & BP Wind Partnership in Virginia VIRGINIA In April 2008, Dominion and BP announced a wind partnership in Virginia Dominion & BP will jointly develop, construct, and operate utility- scale wind projects in Virginia Dominion will participate through its utility, Virginia Electric & Power Company BP will participate through its BP Wind Energy North America subsidiary In January 2009, two sites in Tazewell and Wise counties were announced

27 Wind Highland New Wind Virginia's First Approved Project 39 MW Under way since 2002 (or 1959) Ready to Begin Construction Paved Way for Future Development

28 Wind FreedomWorks Early Stages 200+ MW Potential Opportunities in GW NF Met Towers Permitted with Forest Service

29 Wind VA State Legislature 2009 Virginia has incredible renewable energy potential Leaders Recognize Opportunity –LG Bolling –Gov. Kaine –Sen. Wagner Must be investing in renewable energy, wind in particular. Currently in VA, there are too many obstacles Legislative effort designed to remove some of the burdens in a responsible manner –Sensitive to environmental concerns –Focused on Community involvement –Yet encourages investment in renewable energy.

30 Wind 30 Inside the Turbine

31 Wind 31 Turbine Mechanics, Assembly and Facilities The blades on a turbine act as an airfoil and the lift produced can move the blades at low wind speeds The blades pitch (rotate on each axis) to increase or decrease lift dependant on wind speed to help regulate RPM The nacelle (power head on top of the tower) spins 360 degrees and is automatically rotated into the wind via computer controls The blades connect to a shaft connected to generators in the nacelle to produce electricity Blades turn at approximately 9 to 30 rpm Cut in wind speed between approximately 3.5 M/S (7.83 MPH) and 4.0 M/S (8.95MPH) Cut out wind speed between approximately 20 M/S (44.7MPH)aproximately and 25 M/S (55.9MPH) Rotor diameters up to 325 (swept area) Tower and nacelle up to approximately 250 and overall height up to approximately 425 Total weight over 300 tons Most electrical wires connecting turbines under ground Turbines can be rated to produce up to 2675KW (2,675,000 WATTS) at 690 VOLTS

32 Wind Tower Assembly Nacelle Placement Rotor Attached Complete Unit

33 Wind 33 Wind Farm Facilities O/H Transmission 100m Hard standing Foundations 70t 80mdia 34t Rotor Unit transformer Main transformer Inter connector Access road Control Room O/H Transmission 100m Hard standing Foundations 70t 80mdia 34t Rotor Unit transformer Main transformer Inter connector Access road Control Room 100m Hard standing Foundations 70t 80mdia 34t Rotor Unit transformer Main transformer Access road Control Room 100m Hard standing Foundations 70t 80mdia 34t Rotor Unit transformer Main transformer Access road Met. Mast Meteorological Towers Roads Crane Pads/ Access Foundations Operating & Maintenance Buildings Computer Control System (SCADA) Electrical Gathering Systems

34 Wind 34 ~ Questions ~


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