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MODULE 1 Introduction to Backward Design and Learner-Centered Teaching (LCT)

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Presentation on theme: "MODULE 1 Introduction to Backward Design and Learner-Centered Teaching (LCT)"— Presentation transcript:

1 MODULE 1 Introduction to Backward Design and Learner-Centered Teaching (LCT)

2 Our Goal How to design engaging learning experiences that focuses on understanding? At the end of the course, faculty will be able to plan, design and implement an engaging course centered on students learning

3 Learning Objectives What is the difference between knowledge and understanding? How the backward design differ from the traditional way? How does course design affect student learning? What are the benefits of backward design? What are the stages of backward design? How do they relate to each other? How LCT differ from the traditional teaching? What are the benefits of using LCT? What are the LCT approaches? What are the purposes of using LCT approaches?

4 The Traditional Way Topic Resources and Instruction Assessments What is the course about? What do I need to help me to teach it? How should I teach it? How should I assess students? What is the PROBLEM?

5 It is too Vague!! Choose a course and ask yourself: What is the purpose of the course? Is it to cover the topics? Is it to understand the book? Usually what professors do is to give the students as many information as possible Focus on cover the Knowledge What is the PROBLEM?

6 Do Students really understand? KnowledgeUnderstanding Definitions and Concepts Where it can be applied Limited application Application to new and different situations Causes and consequences Follow a recipeChef vs May be successful if does exactly what the recipes says Cannot cook without the recipe Able to create new recipes Able to predict what happens if an ingredient is added

7 In summary, the problems are: The course content is NOT aligned to the desired outcomes The course may have too much content Activities may not be aligned with the purpose of the course It focuses on the content and teaching method, instead of student understanding (lack of application) What is the CONSEQUENCE? Next Slide

8 Design affects learning Unrelated topics and activities How does course design influence student learning? Confusion to get the main point - the big idea. Students are not able to transfer the knowledge to other contexts Coverage approach encourages memorization – “cramming for the test” Knowledge will last for a short term. Students do not really learn How should the design be done? Next Slide

9 The Backward Design 1st 2nd 3rd Define Learning Objectives Define Evidences of Learning and Assessment tasks Plan Learning Experiences

10 Learning Objectives What should the students know, understand and be able to do? 1 What is the point? What is the Big Idea? Why should students learn it? See MODULE 2

11 Evidences of Learning and Assessment Tasks How will professors know if students achieved desired results? 2 How to measure understanding? What look for? How to evaluate the assessment results? See MODULE 3

12 Learning Experiences What should students do to achieve the desired results? 3 What activities will help students to get the point? What is the role of the professor? How to engage students? See MODULE 4

13 Learning Experiences What characteristics the learning experiences should have to help students to learn? 3

14 Learner-Centered Teaching Focuses on student learning Encourages students to participate Challenges students to think critically Creates meaning from experience Relies on multiples sources of learning and teaching Uses examples grounded in real-life experience Allows for creativity and discovery in and outside the classroom Teaching approach that: Why is it different? Next Slide

15 The Traditional Teaching “It is a rain of information”

16 Traditional Teaching vs Learner- Centered Teaching SOURCE: BehavioralismConstructivism CurriculumBegins with the parts of the whole. Emphasizes basic skills Emphasizes big concepts, beginning with the whole and expanding to include the parts ValueStrict adherence to fixed curriculum is highly valued Pursuit of student questions and interests is valued MaterialsTextbooks and workbooksPrimary sources of material and manipulative materials Learning base RepetitionInteractive, building on what the student already knows TeachersDisseminate informationHelp students to construct their own knowledge vs

17 The spotlight shifts from the teacher to the student! SOURCE: BehavioralismConstructivism Teacher’s role Directive, rooted in authorityTeacher's role is interactive, rooted in negotiation and coaching StudentsRecipients of knowledgeBuilders of knowledge AssessmentThrough testing, correct answersIncludes student works, observations, and points of view, as well as tests. Process is as important as product KnowledgeIs seen as inertIs seen as dynamic, ever changing with our experiences Class Activities Students work primarily alone.Students work primarily in groups vs

18 LCT Approaches

19 Active Learning Makes the learning environment exciting! Encourages students to actively participate in class activities, promoting interest and increasing self-confidence Examples: In-class discussion, debates, writing Peer teaching or team working Visual instruction: Videos, Demonstration Games Role-playing See MODULE 4

20 Inquiry Learning Understanding by questioning Encourages students to think critically and solve problems Examples: Problem-Solving Activities Case Study Simulation to test different alternatives Project Development See MODULE 5

21 Contextual Learning Learning in real-life situations Integrates classroom instruction with real- life situation and reflection. It applies knowledge in real-world, addressing community needs and turning students into responsible citizens Example: Science class about pollution complemented with an activity of collecting trash in an urban area See MODULE 6

22 Benefits Backward Design LCT Engages students Creates the habit of inquiring Gives the opportunity to learn from experience Flexibility to adapt class activities to student style and interests Clear course objectives Focus on the Big Ideas Class activities and assessments coherent with course objectives

23 Summary Backward Design’s Essence is that a course must be designed around its objectives Design stages: 1.Identify the big ideas and define objectives 2.Determine evidences of learning to measure if students achieved the objectives defined in stage 1 and the assessment tasks 3.Plan Learning Activities in order to help students to accomplish the course objectives LCT is a teaching approach that improves student learning capabilities by encouraging them to engage in learning activities (Active Learning), think critically (Inquiry Learning), practice knowledge in real-life contexts, and become a responsible citizen (Contextual Learning)

24 Learning Objectives What is the difference between knowledge and understanding? How the backward design differ from the traditional way? How does course design affect student learning? What are the benefits of backward design? What are the stages of backward design? How do they relate to each other? How LCT differ from the traditional teaching? What are the benefits of using LCT? What are the LCT approaches? What are the purposes of using LCT approaches?

25 References Backward Design Wiggins, Grant and McTighe, Jay. Understanding by Design. 2nd Edition. ASCD, Virginia, Learner-Centered Teaching Centered%20Teaching/LCOverview.htm Active Learning Inquiry Learning Contextual Learning


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