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Consistency of Assessment Creative Arts 7-10. What is Assessment? Assessment is the process of identifying, gathering and interpreting information about.

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Presentation on theme: "Consistency of Assessment Creative Arts 7-10. What is Assessment? Assessment is the process of identifying, gathering and interpreting information about."— Presentation transcript:

1 Consistency of Assessment Creative Arts 7-10

2 What is Assessment? Assessment is the process of identifying, gathering and interpreting information about students' learning. The central purpose of assessment is to provide information on student achievement and progress and set the direction for ongoing teaching and learning. “Schools are to undertake assessment to collect information about students’ learning. This will occur through both formal and informal activities. Assessment of student learning will be undertaken for all learners, including students with disabilities:  enrolled in regular classes;  enrolled in special classes or in special schools;  accessing life skills outcomes and content in Years  7-10 or following life skills patterns of study in Years11-12.” Policy Standards for Curriculum Planning and Programming, Assessing and Reporting to Parents K-12

3 Assessment ‘for’ Learning Assessment for learning acknowledges that assessment should occur as a regular part of teaching and learning and that the information gained from assessment activities can be used to shape the teaching and learning process. Assessment for learning in the K-10 Curriculum Framework is designed to enhance teaching and improve learning. It is assessment that gives students opportunities to produce the work that leads to development of their knowledge, skills and understanding. Assessment for learning involves teachers in deciding how and when to assess student achievement, as they plan the work students will do, using a range of appropriate assessment strategies including self-assessment and peer assessment. Teachers of K-10 students will provide students with opportunities in the context of everyday classroom activities, as well as planned assessment events, to demonstrate their learning.

4 Assessment ‘of’ Learning Enables teachers to report on the status of student learning at various points in the teaching and learning program. Involves teachers making professional judgements of student achievement, based on evidence collected from both formal and informal measures of each student’s performance, over time on a number of assessment for learning activities.

5 Developing a shared understanding of syllabus outcomes & content Click on the link below for information about syllabus outcomes and content in your subject area: Dance Drama Music Visual Arts

6 Collaborative planning and quality assessment processes Faculty planning sessions support quality assessment processes Curriculum K-12 workshops support collaborative planning and moderation processes e.g. Stages 4/5 assessment in Drama in 2007; Dance 7-12 Composition online course in 2007; Music online technology course in 2007 details on the professional learning website earn07/semester1/s_crearts.htm earn07/semester1/s_crearts.htm

7 The Assessment Resource Centre supports assessing and reporting student achievement relative to standards

8 Work samples on the Assessment Resource Centre are not as comprehensive for some arts subjects as others. Further work samples to support teachers to judge standards in the arts will be available on the Curriculum Support website in /index.htm

9 Using Work Samples Work samples aligned to grades assist teachers to have a clear understanding of the standards at each grade level. For each subject area in each stage, the samples of student work, together, show the standard of work typically produced by students performing at that grade level. Teachers can use this information to assist them to consistently apply the Common Grade Scale to award grades to students.

10 Using Work Samples Aligning a work sample to a particular grade indicates that the work sample is of a standard that would typically be produced by a student whose overall performance, on balance, best matches that grade description. The samples of work for a subject area for a particular grade, when taken collectively, enable teachers to clearly see the quality of work typically produced by students who will be awarded each grade at the end of the stage.

11 Awarding Grades and Understanding Standards Board of Studies Advice

12 Getting to know the standards (1) You become familiar with the standards by reading the descriptions for each grade the tasks and activities the work samples, and the grade commentaries.

13 Getting to know the standards (2) While reading, think of your experiences with students you have taught who have produced work of a similar standard. This will give you a “mental picture” of the knowledge, skills and understanding represented by that grade. Discussions with your colleagues may also be helpful.

14 Getting to know the standards (3) Discussions with your colleagues may also be helpful particularly for  New teachers  Where a teacher is not experienced with that stage

15 Choosing the right grade (1) Reporting with grades requires teachers to use their on-balance judgement in relation to standards. This is a key professional skill.

16 Choosing the right grade (2) An on-balance judgement does not just focus on a single piece of work. Teachers weigh up the assessment information collected for a student up to that point in time. This information will come from both formal assessment activities and informal observations and will be built up over time and in different situations.

17 Consistent teacher judgements The consistency of judgements about grades within and between schools comes from following teaching programs based on common syllabuses using the common grade scale considering shared samples of student work. discussions with colleagues

18 Common Grade Scale GradeGrade Descriptions A The student has an extensive knowledge and understanding of the content and can readily apply this knowledge. In addition, the student has achieved a very high level of competence in the processes and skills and can apply these skills to new situations. B The student has a thorough knowledge and understanding of the content and a high level of competence in the processes and skills. In addition, the student is able to apply this knowledge and these skills to most situations. C The student has a sound knowledge and understanding of the main areas of content and has achieved an adequate level of competence in the processes and skills. D The student has a basic knowledge and understanding of the content and has achieved a limited level of competence in the processes and skills. E The student has an elementary knowledge and understanding in few areas of the content and has achieved very limited competence in some of the processes and skills.

19 A-E Grades At the beginning of a reporting period, teachers will consider what students are expected to learn. That is, the knowledge, skills and understanding that is typically spelt out in the syllabuses and the teaching/learning programs developed by schools. At the end of the reporting period, teachers will consider how well students have achieved. This is addressed by using the common A-E grade scale which summarises the degree to which students have demonstrated their achievement of the knowledge, skills and understanding they have had the opportunity to learn. How well takes into account the breadth and depth of their learning.

20 Course Performance Descriptors Course performance descriptors have been developed for each course. They describe the main features of a typical student's performance at each grade measured against the syllabus objectives and outcomes for the course. You will make the final judgement of the most appropriate grade on the basis of available assessment information and with reference to the course performance descriptors. The grades awarded should reflect the relative emphasis placed on the assessable objectives of school programs and the syllabus. For example, where a school has placed considerable emphasis on the development of research skills, that emphasis should be reflected in the assessment program.

21 Using AE Grades and CPDs Year 7 Semester 1 A-E reporting scale used to make judgements on student achievement related to the syllabus outcomes and content taught during that semester only. Semester 2 Year 8 Semester 1 Semester 2 Year 9 Semester 1 Semester 2 Year 10 Semester 1BOS CPDs used to make judgement Semester 2

22 Making Judgements Assessment ‘for’ Learning Students demonstrate achievement in the arts in a range of contexts and over time. The processes leading to making, performing and composing works are continually assessed ‘for’ learning The language of the course performance descriptors can be incorporated into observation schedules and other tools that assess learning. Examples of these tools can be found in 7-10 materials on the Curriculum Support website at eativearts/index.htm eativearts/index.htm Regular feedback to students is essential in assessment ‘for’ learning. This may take the form of formal or informal verbal feedback or annotations in learning logs and diaries

23 Allocating Grades Assessment ‘of’ Learning Scheduling of activities and tasks and weighting applied should reflect course programs In general, greater weight should be given to tasks undertaken towards the end of the course Assessment activities should give students opportunities to show what they know and can do The allocation of grades will be based on assessment information collected and with reference to course performance descriptors Course performance descriptors should be interpreted in terms of standards that can be reasonably expected of students within the bounds of the course

24 Helping New Scheme Teachers Mentoring programs in faculties and schools and across school clusters are important in supporting new scheme teachers. It is important to link new teachers to an experienced ‘buddy’ teacher to support them through their first years of teaching and assessing in the subject – this is particularly important for teachers who are the only teacher of that subject in the school. State networks, professional associations and Curriculum K-12 workshops can support new scheme teachers. For contacts in your subject area go to the next slide.

25 Contacts / Resources Dance Drama Music Visual arts

26 Contacts / Resources Wendy Ramsay Visual Arts Consultant Creative Arts Curriculum K-12 Directorate Ph: Fax: Curriculum K-12 Directorate /visualarts/index.htm Includes syllabus support materials, units of work, tutorials, professional learning opportunities and workshops, resource information and links to the Board of Studies syllabus requirements and support documents. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

27 Contacts / Resources Deidhre Wauchop Senior Curriculum Adviser/Dance Consultant Curriculum K-12 Directorate Ph: Fax: Curriculum K-12 Directorate tivearts/dance/index.htm Includes syllabus support materials, units of work, tutorials, professional learning opportunities and workshops, resource information and links to the Board of Studies syllabus requirements and support documents. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

28 Contacts / Resources Colleen Roche Drama Consultant Curriculum K-12 Directorate Ph: Fax: Website: DramaNSW website: Board of Studies website: Assessment Resources for drama at BOS site are at BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

29 Contacts / Resources Margaret Bradley Music Consultant Curriculum K-12 Directorate Ph: Fax: Curriculum Support – Music home page ivearts/music/index.htm Music Work Samples at BOS Assessment Resources site: Stage 4 Stage 5 BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

30 What is the content of Visual Arts syllabuses? The three 7-10 Syllabuses: Visual Arts, Visual Design, Photography and Digital Media define content as Practice, The Conceptual Framework and Frames and their connection with artmaking and critical and historical interpretations and explanations of art. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

31 Practice: Refers to what artists know and do, how they know it, where they do it, with whom and for whom they do it and why they do it BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

32 The Conceptual Framework: Identifies the function of and relationships between the artist, artwork, world and audience as agencies of the artworld BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

33 Frames: The Subjective, Cultural, Structural and Postmodern frames account for different points of view, values and beliefs in and about the visual arts. The frames focus and organise content. They give meaning and generate different understandings about the function of and relationships between the artist, artwork, world and audience. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

34 Frames: Subjective Intuition, emotion, imagination, human experience and memory Cultural Social and ideological perspectives, cultural identity Structural Visual language, codes, symbols and signs Postmodern Intertextuality, reinterpretation, appropriation, parody, irony and satire Challenges, doubts, is suspicious of and sceptical of the other frames BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

35 What will students learn about in Visual Arts? Artmaking * Making artworks in 2D, 3D and/or 4D forms * Representing their ideas and interests with reference to contemporary trends * How artists’- painters, sculptors, architects, designers, photographers and ceramists make artworks BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

36 What will students learn about in Visual Arts? Critical and Historical Studies How art is shaped by different beliefs, values and meanings by exploring artists and artworks from different times and places The relationships in the artworld between the artist- artwork-world-audience How their own lives and experiences can influence their artmaking and critical and historical studies. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

37 What will students learn to do in Visual Arts? Artmaking Make artworks using a range of materials and techniques in 2D, 3D and/or 4D forms, including traditional and contemporary forms, site-specific works, installations, video and digital media and other ICT forms, to build a body of work. Develop their research skills, approaches to experimentation and how to make informed personal choices and judgements. Record procedures and activities about their artmaking practice in their Visual Arts diary. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

38 What will students learn to do in Visual Arts? Critical and Historical Studies Investigate and respond to a wide range of artists and artworks in artmaking, critical and historical studies. Interpret and explain the function of and relationships in the artworld between the artist – artwork – world – audience to make and study artworks. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

39 What will students learn about in Visual Design? Making Making different kinds of visual design artworks in print, object and space-time forms Representing their ideas and interests with reference to contemporary trends and how web designers, architects, commercial and industrial designers, space, light and sound designers, graphic designers and fashion, accessory and textile designers make visual design artworks BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

40 What will students learn about in Visual Design? Critical and Historical Interpretations How visual design is shaped by different beliefs, values and meanings by exploring visual designers and visual design artworks from different times and places Relationships in the artworld between the artist/designer – artwork – world – audience Explore how their own lives and experiences can influence their making and critical and historical studies. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

41 What will students learn to do in Visual Design? Making Make visual design artworks using a range of materials and techniques in print, object and space-time forms, including ICT, to build a folio of work. Develop their research skills, approaches to experimentation and how to make informed personal choices and judgements Record procedures and activities about their making practice in their Visual Design journal. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

42 What will students learn to do in Visual Design? Critical and Historical Interpretations Investigate and respond to a wide range of visual designers and visual design artworks in making, critical and historical studies Interpret and explain the function of and relationships in the artworld between the artist/designer – artwork – world – audience to make and study visual design artworks. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

43 What will students learn about in Photographic and digital media? Making Making different kinds of photographic and digital media works in still, interactive and moving forms Representing their ideas and interests with reference to contemporary trends and how photographers, videographers, film-makers, computer/digital and performance artists make photographic and digital media works. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

44 What will students learn about in Photographic and digital media? Critical and Historical Interpretations How photographic and digital media is shaped by different beliefs, values and meanings by exploring photographic and digital media artists and works from different times and places Relationships in the artworld between the artist – artwork – world – audience How their own lives and experiences can influence their making and critical and historical studies. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

45 What will students learn to do in Photographic and digital media? Making Make photographic and digital media works using a range of materials and techniques in still, interactive and moving forms, including ICT, to build a Photographic and Digital Media portfolio Develop their research skills, approaches to experimentation and how to make informed personal choices and judgements Record procedures and activities about their making practice in their Photographic and Digital Media journal. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

46 What will students learn to do in Photographic and digital media? Critical and Historical Interpretations Investigate and respond to a wide range of photographic and digital media artists and works in making, critical and historical studies Interpret and explain the function of and relationships in the artworld between the artist – artwork – world – audience to make and study photographic and digital media artworks. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

47 The Visual Arts section of the Curriculum K-12 website contains more information and programming proformas which include: Analysis of visual arts content Table of forms Scope and sequence plans Program synopsis proformas Program proformas which include a guide for specific content BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

48 What is the content of the Dance syllabus? In Dance Years 7–10, students engage in an integrated study: of the practices of performance, composition and appreciation and of the elements of dance within the context of dance as an artform. BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

49 What is the study of dance performance? Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills about dance as an artform through dance performance as a means of developing dance technique and performance quality to communicate ideas BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

50 What is the study of dance composition? Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills about dance as an artform through dance composition as a means of creating and structuring movement to express and communicate ideas BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

51 What is the study of dance appreciation? Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills about dance as an artform through dance appreciation as a means of describing and analysing dance as an expression of ideas within a social, cultural or historical context BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

52 What will students learn to do in dance? BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

53 What will students learn about in dance? BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

54 The Dance section of the Curriculum K-12 website contains resources for Years 7-10 dance which include: Scope and sequence plans Units of work ICT content Quality teaching in dance ivearts/stages4_5/dance/index.htm ivearts/stages4_5/dance/index.htm BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

55 Developing a shared understanding of drama syllabus outcomes Use 7-10 Drama syllabus course descriptions to establish your planned Scope & Sequence and Teaching Program together: What will students learn to do? What will students learn about? Note the elements of Quality teaching in NSW public schools in developing a shared understanding of the outcomes Attend professional development courses to assist the process of consistency in teacher judgements in assessment e.g. Stages 4/5 assessment in Drama in 2007; details at tm tm BACK TO CTJ SLIDES

56 Developing a shared understanding of music syllabus outcomes In the Music Mandatory and Elective courses, students will study: the concepts of music (duration, pitch, dynamics and expressive techniques, tone colour, texture and structure) through the learning experiences of performing, composing and listening within the context of a range of styles, periods and genres, incorporating technology and improvisation BACK TO CTJ SLIDES


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