Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1) the use of sustained experimentation and observation to understand how the most common human-induced modifications of the coastal zone produce changes.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1) the use of sustained experimentation and observation to understand how the most common human-induced modifications of the coastal zone produce changes."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 1) the use of sustained experimentation and observation to understand how the most common human-induced modifications of the coastal zone produce changes in ecosystem structure and function; and 2) the application of this understanding to develop prudent management strategies for sustaining the productivity of our coastal land and seascapes. Mission Statement The following are primary goals of the Alabama Center for Estuarine Studies (ACES):

3 ACES Organizational Chart Scientific Advisory Committee Associate VP for Academic Affairs (Judy Stout) Budget Officer Center Director (Bob Shipp) Assistant Director (Ken Heck) Quality Assurance Officer (Mike Dardeau) Data Base Administrator/ Web Page Manager (Randy Schlude) Administrative Assistant (Carolyn Wood)

4 Current Members of SAC Dr. Kevin Summers Mr. Vernon Minton Mr. Robin Riechers Dr. Susan Rees Dr. James B. McClintock Branch Chief for Coastal Ecology Gulf Ecology Division, EPA (Coastal Ecologist) Director, Marine Resources Division, Alabama Department of Conservation (Biologist/ Resource Manager) Manager, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (Economist) Manager, US Army Corps of Engineers (Environmental Biologist) Dean, School of Natural Sciences& Mathematics, UAB (Ecologist) Dr. Walter Boynton Professor, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland (Nutrient Cycling)

5 Current Members of SAC con’t Dr. Loren D. Coen Mr. Robert Carousel Mr. David Yeager Ms. Gina Perovich Dr. Judy Stout Manager, Shellfish Research Section, MRRI, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (Ecologist) Senior Science Advisor, Gulf of Mexico Program, Stennis Space Center, EPA Director, MBNEP Program Officer, EPA VP-Academic Affairs, USA EX OFFICO

6 The effects of eutrophication resulting from both point and non-point sources, including harmful algal blooms, decreasing water clarity and hypoxia The effects of changing land use patterns in the watershed, including the consequences of changing agricultural practices, logging and urbanization Rationale & Philosophy We are focusing our efforts on some of the most common, yet incompletely understood modifications of the coastal zone, both singly and in concert. We are especially interested in:

7 Rationale & Philosophy continued The effects of changing land use patterns in the watershed, including the consequences of changing agricultural practices, logging and urbanization The direct and indirect effects of harvesting finfish and shellfish, including physical alterations of the substrate as well as cascading trophic effects The social and economic impacts of continued human- induced modifications of coastal environments

8 The development and testing of a wide-variety of modeling strategies for: improved understanding and prediction of human-induced changes in coastal ecosystems; and promoting the use of adaptive management practices to solve problems in the coastal zone. Rationale & Philosophy continued

9 Requests for Proposals (RFP) were first developed and distributed in 1998 and have continued through –In 1998, sixteen proposals were received –In 1999, twenty-two proposals were received –In 2000, twelve proposals were received –In 2001, twenty-one proposals were received –In 2002, fifteen proposals were received –In 2003, eleven proposals were received Accomplishments

10 Accomplishments continued The SAC reviewed the proposals, met and made recommendations for funding each year. –In 1998, six proposals were funded –In 1999, eight proposals were funded –In 2000, eleven proposals were funded –In 2001, twelve proposals were funded –In 2002, thirteen proposals were funded –In 2003, eleven proposals were funded To date, 61 projects (44 SGER averaging $25K/yr and 17 Regular Grants averaging $79K/yr) have been funded by ACES

11 Funding has been awarded to Principal Investigators in these departments at USA: Biology – Chemistry - Marine Science Geology/Geography - Mathematics/Statistics Civil Engineering - Sociology/Anthropology College of Medicine Accomplishments continued

12 ACES collaborators also include investigators from UAB, Auburn, Clemson, LSU and the University of Nebraska ACES has supported and is currently supporting many MS and PhD students (e.g., 3-PhD & 9 MS students in Marine Science at USA), as well as several post- doctoral scholars Accomplishments continued

13 2004 Scientific and Institutional Peer Review Richard Batiuk U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Paul Carlson, Jr. Florida Marine Research Institute David Krantz University of Toledo Hans Paerl University of North Carolina Judith Weis Rutgers University

14 Investigators should be encouraged to make the connections between the presence and effects of stressors, including rates of relevant processes and the use of biology in a more dynamic indicator-oriented way. “Effects” and “impacts” are liberally used to describe key concerns and research topics of the Center. However, the research focus does not seem to be on these dynamic and fundamentally important interactions. Some reprioritization along these lines and outside expertise/collaborations in the areas of ecosystem-scale processes and interactions is strongly encouraged. Specific Recommendations

15 Through strategic planning and evaluation of proposals, implementation of the mission statement should be made with a more narrow focus on determining the factors and processes associated with human-induced changes in the watershed on the structure and function of the estuary. Because several years have elapsed since the last scientific conference focused on Mobile Bay, ACES should partner with other agencies to sponsor a Mobile Bay Scientific Information Symposium. Several larger projects-possibly one or two funded at a time- should be encouraged that have integrated components and address a central theme consistent with the Center’s mission. Specific Recommendations continued

16 Specific Recommendations continued The Director and Assistant Director should take a more proactive role in facilitating large ACES projects with a common theme and seeking other venues of funding or collaboration (e.g., participation by state or federal applied-science agencies). A planning meeting should be scheduled with the Director, Assistant Director, SAC, and PIs before the RFA cycle begins to define: (1) an achievable scientific goal at the end of a 5-year program of study; (2) specific questions of estuary structure and function; (3) specific components needed to answer the stated goal; and (4) a logical sequence of subprojects (component projects) to systematically answer specific questions (subprojects would be designed to build on the foundation of earlier projects).

17 Specific Recommendations continued As noted in discussions between the panel members and ACES’ staff, the Mobile Bay comprehensive conservation and management plan (CCMP) is a good starting point for strategic planning. The panel recommends that the Center seek outside expertise as PIs for components that are not covered by the subdisciplines represented by USA faculty. Explicit links to projects (or proposed projects) funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Sea Grant, or other funding agencies (to the extent of submitting parallel proposals) should be encouraged


Download ppt "1) the use of sustained experimentation and observation to understand how the most common human-induced modifications of the coastal zone produce changes."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google