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The Coming of War Sectional strife and Politics. Missouri Compromise Missouri was admitted to the union as a slave state, and Maine was admitted as a.

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Presentation on theme: "The Coming of War Sectional strife and Politics. Missouri Compromise Missouri was admitted to the union as a slave state, and Maine was admitted as a."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Coming of War Sectional strife and Politics

2 Missouri Compromise Missouri was admitted to the union as a slave state, and Maine was admitted as a free state. Illinois (1818)Alabama (1819) Indiana (1816)Mississippi (1817) Ohio (1803)Louisiana (1812) Vermont (1791)Tennessee (1796) Rhode IslandKentucky (1792) New YorkVirginia New HampshireNorth Carolina MassachusettsSouth Carolina ConnecticutMaryland New JerseyGeorgia PennsylvaniaDelaware Balance of Free and Slave States (1821) Free StatesSlave States Original 13 States Maine (1820)Missouri (1821)

3 Slavery was allowed in the part of the Louisiana Purchase south of the 36, 30'N. Slavery was banned north of 36, 30'N, except for Missouri. Sectionalism – loyalty to a state or section rather than to the whole country.

4 Sectional Differences The South vs North

5 Sectional Differences North Orig. settled for religious purpose (puritans) Factories and small family farms with livestock Social structure- more educated and more or less equal South Settled by farmers and set up for trade Agrarian. Many huge plantations with crops Slave based aristocratic based society

6 Southern Society (1850) Slavocracy [plantation owners] The Plain Folk [white yeoman farmers] 6,000,000 Black Freemen Black Slaves 3,200, ,000 Total US Population 23,000,000 [9,250,000 in the South = 40%]

7 Southern Agriculture

8 Value of Cotton Exports As % of All US Exports

9 Changes in Cotton Production

10 Slaves Picking Cotton on a Mississippi Plantation

11 Slaves Using the Cotton Gin

12 Slaves Working in a Sugar-Boiling House, 1823

13 Slave Auction Notice, 1823

14 Slave Auction: Charleston, SC-1856

15 Slave Master Brands Slave Accoutrements Slave muzzle

16 Slave-Owning Population (1850)

17 Southern Pro-Slavery Propaganda

18 Slave debate continues South vs. North New land, same debate Big Problem= Runaways Constitutional Arguments Should slavery expand west?

19 ART.4 SEC. 2 Section 2 - State citizens, Extradition The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States. A Person charged in any State with treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on demand of the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime. (No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, But shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.)Labour (This clause in parentheses is superseded by the 13 th Amendment)

20 * people in UT and NM used popular sovereignty to decide on the slavery issue Compromise of 1850 I. California became a free state. II. The rest of the Mexican Cession was divided into two parts; Utah (UT) and New Mexico (NM). III. The slave trade ended in Washington, D.C. IV. The Fugitive Slave Law was passed.

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22 Runaway Slave Ads

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24 Uncle Toms Cabin 1852 Uncle Toms Cabin 1852 Sold 300,000 copies in the first year. 2 million in a decade! Sold 300,000 copies in the first year. 2 million in a decade!

25 Kansas-Nebraska Act, 1854

26 Bleeding Kansas Border Ruffians (pro-slavery Missourians)

27 New Parties Northern Whigs Free-Soilers Anti Slavery Democrats

28 The Know-Nothings [The American Party] Nativists Anti-Immigrant Anti-Catholic And… …listened to Justin Biber!

29 1856 Presidential Election James Buchanan John C. Frémont Millard Fillmore Democrat Republican Know- Nothing Do You Know something? I Know Nothing!

30 1856 Electi on Result s

31 Dred Scott v. Sanford, 1857

32 The Lincoln-Douglas (Illinois Senate) Debates, 1858

33 Do Now: Read the following quote by Abraham Lincoln. A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved – I do not expect the house to fall – but I do expect it will cease too be divided. It will become all one thing, or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it…or its (supporters) will push it forward till it shall become…lawful in all the states, old as well as new, North as well as South. What point is Lincoln making about the future faced by the United States?

34 John Browns Raid on Harpers Ferry, 1859

35 John Brown: Madman, Hero or Martyr?

36 1860 Presiden tial Election Abraham Lincoln Republican John Bell Constitutional Union Stephen A. Douglas Northern Democrat John C. Breckinridge Southern Democrat

37 1860 Election: A Nation Coming Apart?!

38 1860 Election Results

39 Secession!: SC Dec. 20, 1860

40 Fort Sumter: April 12, 1861 AAUGH!


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