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Common Core State Standards: Begin with the End in Mind Susan Gendron Senior Fellow International Center for Educational Leadership Policy Coordinator,

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Presentation on theme: "Common Core State Standards: Begin with the End in Mind Susan Gendron Senior Fellow International Center for Educational Leadership Policy Coordinator,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Common Core State Standards: Begin with the End in Mind Susan Gendron Senior Fellow International Center for Educational Leadership Policy Coordinator, SMARTER

2 Standards: Important but insufficient To be effective in improving education and getting all students ready for college, workforce training, and life, the Standards must be partnered with a content-rich curriculum and robust assessments, both aligned to the Standards.

3 Next Generation Assessments

4 The Challenge How do we get from here......to here? All students leave high school college and career ready Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness

5 ...and, how can an assessment system contribute to this effort? All students leave high school college and career ready Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness How do we get from here......to here?

6 Assessment Consortia 1. Measure common core standards 2. Provide accurate information about what students know and can do: a. Student achievement standards b. Student growth from year to year c. On-track to college and career ready by the time of HS graduation

7 PARCC GOVERNING STATES SMARTER GOVERNING STATES AZ, AR, FL, GA, IL, IN, LA, MD, MA,NJ, NM, NY, OK, RI, TN, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 16 States CA, CT, HI, ID, KS, ME, MI, MO, MT, NC, NH, NV, OR, UT, VT, WA, WI, WV 18 States

8 PARCC ADVISORY STATES SMARTER ADVISORY STATES AL, CO, DE, KY, MS, NJ, ND, OH, PA, SC 10 States AL, CO, DE, IA, KY, ND, NJ, OH, PA, SC, SD, WY, 12 States

9 All students leave high school college and career ready Adaptive summative assessments benchmarked to college & career readiness Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness Teachers can access formative tools and practices to improve instruction Interim assessments that are flexible and open A Simplified Theory of Action

10 Assessment System Design: Distributed Summative Assessment 10 START OF SCHOOL YEAR END OF SCHOOL YEAR Through- Course 1 Through- Course 2 25%50% Through- Course 3 75% Through- Course 4 90% End- Of-Year Source: Graphic adapted from a representation prepared by the Center for K-12 Assessment & Performance Management (www.k12center.org) Key components: Three through-course components distributed throughout the year in ELA and mathematics, grades One Speaking/Listening assessment administered after students complete the third through course component in ELA; required but not part of summative score – could be used for course grades. One end-of-year assessment

11 To learn more Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium

12 Students (with prompting and support from the teacher) read Garden Helpers in National Geographic Young Explorers and demonstrate their understanding of the main idea of the textnot all bugs are badby retelling key details. [RI.K.2]

13 Students locate key facts or information in Claire Llewellyns Earthworms by using various text features (headings, table of contents, glossary) found in the text. [RI.1.5]

14 Students explain how the main idea that Lincoln had many faces in Russell Freedmans Lincoln: A Photo biography is supported by key details in the text. [RI.3.2]

15 Students explain how Melvin Berger uses reasons and evidence in his book Discovering Mars: The Amazing Story of the Red Planet to support particular points regarding the topology of the planet. [RI.4.8]

16 Students compare and contrast Laurence Yeps fictional portrayal of Chinese immigrants in turn-of-the-twentieth-century San Francisco in Dragonwings to historical accounts of the same period (using materials detailing the 1906 San Francisco earthquake) in order to glean a deeper understanding of how authors use or alter historical sources to create a sense of time and place as well as make fictional characters lifelike and real. [RL.7.9]

17 Students evaluate Jim Murphys The Great Fire to identify which aspects of the text (e.g., loaded language and the inclusion of particular facts) reveal his purpose; presenting Chicago as a city that was ready to burn. [RH.6–8.6]

18 Students analyze in detail the theme of relationships between mothers and daughters and how that theme develops over the course of Amy Tans The Joy Luck Club. Students search the text for specific details that show how the theme emerges and how it is shaped and refined over the course of the novel. [RL.9–10.2]

19 PARCC examples

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37 Your State Standards CCSS

38 International Center for Leadership in Education Application Knowledge Rigor/Relevance Framework

39 International Center for Leadership in Education KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N A B D C AcquisitionApplication AdaptationAssimilation Rigor/Relevance Framework

40 RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework RightAnswer Did Students Get it Right? RationalAnswerRightQuestions RightProcedure High Low

41 International Center for Leadership in Education Planning

42 Student Learning Instruction Assessment Expected Student Performance Actual Student Performance Rigor/Relevanc e Feedback Reflection What How How Well

43 a

44 Rigorous and Relevant Instruction Sharing the standard with Students International Center for Leadership in Education Defining the Focus

45 Rigorous and Relevant Instruction Analyze the verbs International Center for Leadership in Education Defining the Focus

46 Rigorous and Relevant Instruction Reword – the standard International Center for Leadership in Education Defining the Focus

47 Rigorous and Relevant Instruction I can statements International Center for Leadership in Education Defining the Focus

48 Student Understanding What does this standard want you to be able to do or know? to What skills or knowledge do you have to demonstrate to be successful? International Center for Leadership in Education

49 Strategy KWL chart (Know, Want to Know, Learned) Strategy: –Student create a chart (KWL) –Teachers poses questions –Determine what the focus needs to be International Center for Leadership in Education

50 Teacher Talk We are learning….. So what do you need to remember to do? (achieve the standard) Classroom discussion changes – we are learning…. International Center for Leadership in Education

51 Exemplars Show the students the high expectation for the standard International Center for Leadership in Education

52 Formative Assessment Process International Center for Leadership in Education

53 Formative Assessment What is it? What are the major components? What are the similarities with standards- based education? How can you share learning goals with your students? International Center for Leadership in Education

54 Summative/Formative SummativeFormative End of unit, quarter and/or year No grade Final resultsFeedback helps student to improve Multiple choice, extend response, performance assessment Part of regular classroom learning International Center for Leadership in Education

55 Advantages of Formative Assessment Students learn faster Teachers know what students already know & adjust instruction Students aware of progress Most powerful moderator in student achievement Works for at risk students International Center for Leadership in Education

56 Connecting Formative Assessment Process & the Standards Helps the teacher understand HOW students can improve in learning so they can be proficient! International Center for Leadership in Education

57 Formative Assessment Strategies ( Black, Wiliam,1998; Sadler, 1998; Stiggins, 2007;Heritage, 2007) Pre-assessing students Sharing Learning goals with students Co-creating classroom discourse & questioning Rich & challenging tasks elicit student response Identifying gaps International Center for Leadership in Education

58 Formative Assessment Strategies (Black, Wiliam,1998; Sadler, 1998; Stiggins, 2007;Heritage, 2007) Providing feedback/how to improve Self-assessments Peer- assessments Opportunities to close the gap Celebrations International Center for Leadership in Education

59 Formative Assessment Process Popham (2008) Student response Monitor the Response Diagnose the Response Share Feedback Based on the Diagnosis Student Uses Feedback to Learn Report Growth & Celebrate International Center for Leadership in Education

60 Pre-assess students International Center for Leadership in Education

61 Formative Assessment Process Popham (2008) Student response Monitor the Response Diagnose the Response Share Feedback Based on the Diagnosis Student Uses Feedback to Learn Report Growth & Celebrate International Center for Leadership in Education

62 What do students say Class discussion Debate Oral presentation story/event telling Agree/disagree Choral reading Think-Pair-Share Youre the Judge Ask a question Make a Statement Radio Show Small group talk Play/drama Reciting a poem/speech Panel discussion Music Interviews Think aloud Answer specific Podcasts Read aloud Other____ International Center for Leadership in Education

63 Formative Assessment Process Popham (2008) Student response Monitor the Response Diagnose the Response Share Feedback Based on the Diagnosis Student Uses Feedback to Learn Report Growth & Celebrate International Center for Leadership in Education

64 Ask Questions Use Fingers, Cards, Fingers A,B, C, D cards Rate responses –4 – Complete response –3 – Demonstrates an understanding or application of the goal –2 – Minimal evidence –1- No evidence International Center for Leadership in Education

65 Take a Three Minute Pulse After discussion, reading, lecture Reflect, discuss what they learned using higher order thinking skills Suggested questions: (Marzano) –How does this information relate to you? –How does what weve just learned relate to.. –How is what we just learned similar or different to –Identify one thing you knew and one thing that was new to you… International Center for Leadership in Education

66 Exit Sheet I think I Got It This is what I learned: This is how your lesson helped: Still Need More Practice Im still struggling with: My biggest question is: Tomorrow, Tomorrow Can I have help with: I could practice by: Teach Me More Mini-lesson idea: This would help me because: International Center for Leadership in Education

67 One Minute Response What I learned today… What I am unclear/unsure about Comments… International Center for Leadership in Education

68 Diagnostic Learning Log Major ConceptUnsure/Questio ns My solutions International Center for Leadership in Education

69 Formative Assessment Process Popham (2008) Student response Monitor the Response Diagnose the Response Share Feedback Based on the Diagnosis Student Uses Feedback to Learn Report Growth & Celebrate International Center for Leadership in Education

70 Feedback Student Work Feedback Student work Feedback Student Proficient Celebrate International Center for Leadership in Education

71 More Strategies Traffic Light feedback Gallery Walk Portfolio Concept Map Ticket out the door International Center for Leadership in Education

72 Self Assessment cards Please notice… Ive learned… I have a question… I want you to know I was really stuck… But I think I figured it out… Still need practice: –Im struggling with… –My big question is… International Center for Leadership in Education

73 Rigorous and Relevant Instruction 1.Skills, knowledge, behaviors and concepts 2.Student work (Level of Rigor and Relevance) 3.Cross-reference to state standards Student Performance

74 International Center for Leadership in Education Rigorous and Relevant Instruction Assessment matched student performance Type of assessment consistent with strategies Level matches the level of rigor and relevance Multiple measures Assessment

75 Types of Assessment Multiple Choice Multiple Choice Constructed Response Constructed Response Extended Response Extended Response Technology Enhanced Technology Enhanced Performance Task/Event Performance Task/Event Portfolio Portfolio Interview Interview Self Reflection Self Reflection Rigorous and Relevant Instruction

76 Low High LowHigh Traditional Tests Performance Rigor/Relevance Framework

77 International Center for Leadership in Education Verb list by Rigor/Relevance Quadrant Calculatematch Choosememorize Countname Definerecall Describerecite Findrecord Identifyselect Labelspell Listlocate Analyzedifferentiate Categorizediscriminate Classifyevaluate Compare examine Concludeexplain Contrastinfer Defendjudge Diagramjustify prove Adaptjustify Arguemodify Composepredict Concludeprioritize Constructpropose Designrate Evaluaterecommend Formulaterevise Inventteach Adjustinterpret Applyinterview Buildmake Calculatemodel Constructplay Demonstrateproduce Dramatizerelate Drawsequence Illustratesolve

78 RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework RightAnswer Did Students Get it Right? RationalAnswerRightQuestions RightProcedure High Low

79 RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Recall, facts, observations, demonstrate Next Generation Summarize, analyze, organize, evaluate Predict, design, create, innovate Apply, relate, demonstrate High Low

80 A - Ask questions to recall facts, make observations, or demonstrate understanding: What is/are ___? How many ___? What did you observe ___? What can you recall ___? In what ways ___? What did you notice about ___? What do/did you feel/see/hear/smell ___? What do/did you remember ___? What did you find out about ___?

81 B – Ask questions to apply or relate: How would you do that? Where will you use that knowledge? How does that relate to your experience? How can you demonstrate that? Calculate that for ___? How would you illustrate that? How do you know it works? Can you apply what you know to this real- world problem?

82 C – Ask questions to summarize, analyze, organize, or evaluate: How are these similar/different? How is this like? Whats another way we could express that? How can you distinguish between ___? How would you defend your position? What evidence can you offer? How do you know?

83 D – Ask questions to predict, design, or create: How would you design a __ to __? How would you compose a song? Can you see a possible solution? Can you develop a proposal that would__? How would you do it differently? How would you devise your own way to deal with ___?

84 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N Extended Response Extended Response Product Performance Product Performance Primary Assessments Rigor/Relevance Framework Portfolio Portfolio Product Performance Product Performance Interview Interview Self Reflection Self Reflection Process Process Performance Performance Product Performance Product Performance Multiple Choice Multiple Choice Constructed Response Constructed Response

85 Performance Assessments Set criteria Student knows what is expected Teacher must analyze what is essential in the task

86 Developing Scoring Guides Holistic Checklist Analytic International Center for Leadership in Education

87 Holistic Simplest Broad categories Each category is given maximum point value Evaluator assigns points to each measure Total score given to performance International Center for Leadership in Education

88 Analytic (Rubric) Most popular for performance tasks Several broad categories Specific criteria for each category High to low levels of performance Sample guides International Center for Leadership in Education

89 4 - Composition shows excellent understanding of narrative writing. It includes seven or more details to support the main idea and has a distinctive beginning, middle and ending. The paper sticks to the topic with a logical plan and sequence. It is well elaborated and easy to understand. 3 – Composition shows a reasonable understanding of narrative writing. It includes 5 or more details to support the main idea and has a beginning, middle and ending. It sticks to the topic most of the time but might have some unrelated details. The paper has a reasonable plan …. 2 1

90 RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C Increasing Rigor/Relevance High Low

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