Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 PowerPoint ® to accompany Second Edition Ramutkowski Booth Pugh Thompson Whicker Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 PowerPoint ® to accompany Second Edition Ramutkowski Booth Pugh Thompson Whicker Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 1 PowerPoint ® to accompany Second Edition Ramutkowski Booth Pugh Thompson Whicker Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Medical Assisting Chapter 3

3 2 Objectives 3-1 Define ethics, bioethics, and law. 3-2 Discuss the measures a medical practice must take to avoid malpractice claims. 3-3 Describe OSHA requirements for a medical office. 3-4 Describe procedures for handling an incident of exposure to hazardous materials. Legal and Ethical Issues in Medical Practice, including HIPAA

4 3 Objectives (cont.) 3-5 Compare and contrast quality control and quality assurance procedures. 3-6 Explain how to protect patient confidentiality. 3-7 Understand basic overview of HIPAA. Legal and Ethical Issues in Medical Practice, including HIPAA

5 4 Medical Law and Ethics Knowledge of Medical Law and Ethics provides insight into: The rights, responsibilities, and concerns of health care consumers. The legal and ethical issues facing society; patients, and health care professionals as the world changes. The impact of rising costs on the laws and ethics of health care delivery.

6 5 Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) A law is a rule of conduct or action. Ethics is a standard of behavior. Governments enact laws to maintain order and public safety. Moral values serve as the basis for ethical conduct. Criminal and civil laws pertain to health care practitioners. Family, culture, and society help form individuals moral values.

7 6 Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Criminal Law Involves crimes against the state Criminal acts are classified as either a felony or misdemeanor Examples include: Murder Arson Rape Burglary Civil Law Involves crimes against the person Includes a general category of laws known as torts Torts are either: Intentional (willful) Unintentional (accidental)

8 7 False Imprisonment Assault Defamation of Character Fraud Invasion of privacy To cause another person to feel threatened. Interference with a persons right to be left alone. Damaging a persons reputation by making a public statement. An action that causes bodily harm to another. Even touching without permission. Intentional, unlawful restraint or confinement of a person. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Intentional Torts Depriving or attempting to deprive a person of his or her rights. Battery

9 8 Acts that are committed with no intent to cause harm but are done with a disregard for the consequences. The term negligence is used to describe such actions when health care practitioners fail to exercise ordinary care resulting in patient injury. Malpractice is the negligent delivery of professional services. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Unintentional Torts

10 9 Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Contracts A contract is a voluntary agreement between two parties in which specific promises are made for a consideration. AgreementConsideration Contractual CapacityLegal Subject Matter 4 Elements of a Contract

11 10 Types of Contracts Expressed Contracts Clearly stated in written or spoken words A payment contract is an example Implied Contracts Actions or conduct of the parties rather than words, create the contract A patient rolling up his or her sleeve to receive an injection is an example Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Contracts

12 11 A physician who no longer wants to manage a patients care must withdraw in a formal, legal manner by: Providing written communication to the patient Recommending that patient seek another physician as soon as possible Mail letter by certified mail with return receipt requested Summarize all communication in patient chart and place copy of all documentation in chart Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Terminating Care of a Patient

13 12 Typical Reasons Physicians May Terminate Care of a Patient: Refusal to follow physician instructions Personality conflicts Failure to pay for services rendered Repeated failure to keep appointments Patient family member complaints Disagreement regarding medication orders Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Terminating Care of a Patient

14 13 Malpractice claims are lawsuits by a patient against a physician for errors in diagnosis or treatment. Negligence cases are those in which a person believes a medical professionals actions or lack thereof, caused harm to the patient. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Malpractice Latin term which means The thing speaks for itself.

15 14 Examples of Negligence: Abandonment Delayed treatment Legal Terms used to classify Negligence Malfeasance (unlawful act or misconduct) Misfeasance (lawful act done incorrectly) Nonfeasance (failure to perform an act that is ones required duty or that is required by law) Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Malpractice

16 15 The 4 Ds of Negligence uty Patients must show that a physician-patient relationship existed. erelict Patients must show that the physician failed to comply with the standards of the profession. irect Cause Patients must show that any damages were a direct cause of a physicians breach of duty. amages Patients must prove that they suffered injury. Patients must be able to prove all 4 Ds in order to move forward with a malpractice suit. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Malpractice

17 16 Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Malpractice Settling Malpractice Suits Arbitration Persons outside the court system with special knowledge in the field listen to the case, and decide the dispute. Court Written court orders (subpoena) are delivered to involved parties. Subpoena duces tecum is a court order to produce documents like patient records.

18 17 Law of Agency Employees are considered to be agents of the physician while performing professional tasks. Physicians are thereby responsible or liable for the negligence of employees. Respondeat superior is a Latin term meaning Let the master answer. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Malpractice Employees are also legally responsible for their own actions and they can be sued directly.

19 18 According to the AAMA, medical assistants should uphold legal concepts by: Maintaining confidentiality. Practicing within the scope of training and capabilities. Preparing and maintaining medical records. Documenting accurately. Using proper guidelines when releasing information. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Standard of Care

20 19 Follow employers established policies dealing with the health-care contract. Follow legal guidelines and maintain awareness of health-care legislation and regulations. Maintain and dispose of regulated substances in compliance with government guidelines. Follow established risk-management and safety procedures. Recognize professional credentialing criteria. Help develop and maintain personnel, policy and procedure manuals. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Standard of Care (cont.)

21 20 Examples of duties related to legal requirements: Vital statistics (births & deaths) Abuse (drug abuse & child abuse) Violent Injuries STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) Patient consent forms Insurance billing Appointment books Patient records and information Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Administrative Duties and the Law

22 21 Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Controlled Substances and the Law Medical Assistants must follow the correct procedure for keeping and disposing of controlled substances. Be familiar with correct dosages, potential complications, and refill rules. Keep prescription pads secure and out of reach.

23 22 Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Communication and the Law Medical assistants are not allowed to decide what information is to be disclosed to the patient. The role of the medical assistant is to foster supportive, respectful communication with patients. Good, clear, nonjudgmental communication can prevent misunderstandings and legal confrontations.

24 23 Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Legal Documents and the Patient Living Wills (Advance Directives) A legal document stating types of treatment the patient does and does not want in an event of terminal illness, unconsciousness or comatose state. Patients with living wills are asked to name someone that will make decisions on their behalf (durable power of attorney) if they are unable to do so. Uniform Donor Card A legal document that states a persons wish to donate one or more organs as a gift. Even total body anatomical gifts are made.

25 24 All patient information must be kept confidential and shared only with the appropriate staff involved in the care of the patient. Medical Law and Ethics (cont.) Confidentiality Issues Keep records out of sight so night workers and other patients can not view it. Do not discuss the case with anyone outside the medical office.

26 25 Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.) August 21, 1996 is the date the U.S. Congress HIPAA was passed Two main sections of the law: Title I: Health Care Portability Title II: Preventing Healthcare Fraud and Abuse; Administrative Simplification; Medical Liability Reform

27 26 Title I: Health Care Portability Portability deals with protecting healthcare coverage for employees who change jobs. Reduces the risk that individuals will lose their existing health care coverage when changing jobs. Allows workers to purchase insurance on their own if coverage is lost under their employer. Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.)

28 27 Title II: HIPAA Privacy Rule The HIPAA Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information is the first comprehensive federal protection for the privacy of health information. The core of the HIPAA Privacy Rule is the protection, use, and disclosure of protected health information (PHI). Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.)

29 28 Use and Disclosure are two important concepts under HIPAA that must be understood. Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.) Information is used when it moves within an organization. Information is disclosed when it is transmitted between or among organizations. Examples of Use Sharing Employing Applying Utilizing Examining Analyzing Examples of Disclosing Release Transfer Provision of access to Divulging in any manner

30 29 Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.) HIPAA will allow the provider to use health care information for: ayment perations reatment Providers are allowed to share information in order to provide care to patients. Providers are allowed to share information in order to receive payment for the treatment provided. Providers are allowed to share information to conduct normal business activities, such as quality improvement.

31 30 The following information may be disclosed without authorization: Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.) Medical researchers Emergencies Funeral Directors/Coroners Disaster Relief Services Law enforcement Correctional Institutions Abuse and Neglect Organ and Tissue Donation Centers Work related conditions that may affect employee health Judicial/administrative proceedings at the patient request or as directed by a subpoena or court order

32 31 Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.) First these rights are communicated through a document called the Notice of Privacy Practices. The next step is to implement a document that explains the policy of the medical facility on obtaining authorization for use and disclosure of patient information for purposes other than TPO (treatment, payment or healthcare operations).

33 32 Security Rule This rule specifies how patient information is protected on: Computer networks The internet Disks and other storage media and extranets Other Security Avenues to Consider Chart security Reception area security Fax security Medical Assistant clinical station security Medical Law and Ethics Confidentiality Issues (cont.)

34 33 A 36-year old patient comes to her initial office visit and the medical assistant begins to register the patient. While the patient is completing her paperwork, she passes out in the waiting room lobby. She is carried to the local hospital and diagnosed with a severe stroke. As the patient recovers, she verbalizes a desire to bring a malpractice suit on the physician. Are all the elements required for malpractice present? Apply Your Knowledge

35 34 A 36-year old patient comes to her initial office visit and the medical assistant begins to register the patient. While the patient is completing her paperwork, she passes out in the waiting room lobby. She is carried to the local hospital and diagnosed with a severe stroke. As the patient recovers, she verbalizes a desire to bring a malpractice suit on the physician. Are all the elements required for malpractice present? No, for starters, duty has not yet been established which is the first required element. Answer Apply Your Knowledge - Answer

36 35 OSHA Regulations The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a division of the U.S. Department of Labor. Regulations describe precautions that must be taken to protect workers from exposure to infectious diseases such as: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Hepatitis B virus (HBV)

37 36 OSHA requires that medical practices follow Universal Precautions. Hospitals are required to follow Standard Precautions, which is a combination of Universal Precautions and Body Substance Isolation guidelines. Both Universal Precautions and Standard Precautions were developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). OSHA Regulations (cont.)

38 37 OSHA Regulations (cont.) Disposable gloves Masks Goggles/Face Shield Gowns The law requires that the employer provide all necessary protective clothing to employees free of charge.

39 38 Decontamination All exposed work surfaces must be sprayed with a 10% bleach solution or other agent approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Sharp Equipment To prevent exposure, sharps are to be placed in a leak- proof, puncture-resistant, color-coded, labeled container Exposure Incidents Incidents are to be reported immediately Current procedures may need to be modified OSHA Regulations (cont.)

40 39 Postexposure Procedures Employers must offer a free medical evaluation to exposed employee Employers must also refer employee to a licensed health-care provider for blood sampling, appropriate treatment and counseling Employees may refuse treatment by signing a waiver When a medical worker is first employed, the employer must offer at no cost the opportunity to have the HBV vaccination within 10 days OSHA Regulations (cont.)

41 40 Laundry All laundry must be labeled and bagged appropriately. Hazardous Materials Employers must keep an inventory of all hazardous materials in the workplace (MSDS Sheets.) Training Requirements All employees that may be exposed must be given free, annual training during work hours. OSHA Regulations (cont.)

42 41 General Regulations General Work Area Laws Restrict: Eating & Drinking Smoking Applying lip balm & cosmetics Handling contact lenses Storing food or drinks in refrigerators used to store blood or other potentially infectious materials OSHA Regulations (cont.)

43 42 Documentation Inspections are done in response to complaints and at random. The office must have a written Exposure Control Plan and keep necessary forms on file as indicated. OSHA Inspections Inspections are done in response to complaints and at random Penalties include fines and monies are paid to the federal treasury Serious violations in the laboratory may result in suspension of laboratory payments from Medicare OSHA Regulations (cont.)

44 43 A medical assistant working in a local medical office has a severe allergy to latex. What should she do when handling potentially hazardous materials? Apply Your Knowledge

45 44 A medical assistant working in a local medical office has a severe allergy to latex. What should she do when handling potentially hazardous materials? The physician, according to OSHA, must supply the necessary protective equipment so latex free gloves should be on hand in such situations. Answer Apply Your Knowledge -Answer

46 45 Quality Control and Assurance The Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA88) set standards for the quality of work performed in a laboratory and the accuracy of test results. CLIA requires that every medical office have a quality assurance program. Three categories of laboratory tests: Waived Moderate-complexity High-complexity

47 46 Elements of the Quality Assurance (QA) Program Written policies on standards of patient care and professional behavior A quality control (QC) program Training and continuing education programs Documentation requirements Evaluation methods Quality Control and Assurance (cont.)

48 47 Quality Control and Assurance (cont.) The Laboratory QC Program must cover: Patient Preparation Procedures Collection of Specimens Labeling Preserving & Transporting Specimens Test Methods Inconsistent Results Use & Maintenance of Equipment Personnel Training Complaints & Investigations Corrective Actions

49 48 Code of Ethics Bioethics Pertains to issues that arise due to medical advances Principles of medical ethics have developed over time dating back to Hippocrates A document called the Patients Bill of Rights lists ethical principles that protect the patient

50 49 Apply Your Knowledge A 26-year old patient is very upset about her proposed treatment plan and refuses to be taken to the hospital as the physician has suggested. The patient attempts to leave the office but the physician instructs the medical assistant to give the patient a sedative so she can wait until her husband arrives. What are implications of this situation?

51 50 A 26-year old patient is very upset about her proposed treatment plan and refuses to be taken to the hospital as the physician has suggested. The patient attempts to leave the office but the physician instructs the medical assistant to give the patient a sedative so she can wait until her husband arrives. What are implications of this situation? Even though the physician believes he is acting on the best interest of the patient, the patient refused care and has the right to do so as long as she is competent. The administration of the sedative could be classified as a form of false imprisonment. Answer Apply Your Knowledge -Answer

52 51 End of Chapter


Download ppt "1 PowerPoint ® to accompany Second Edition Ramutkowski Booth Pugh Thompson Whicker Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google