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School Counselors as Leaders and Advocates: Implementing the NC Guidance Essential Standards using the ASCA National Model Linda Brannan K-12 Student.

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Presentation on theme: "School Counselors as Leaders and Advocates: Implementing the NC Guidance Essential Standards using the ASCA National Model Linda Brannan K-12 Student."— Presentation transcript:

1 School Counselors as Leaders and Advocates: Implementing the NC Guidance Essential Standards using the ASCA National Model Linda Brannan K-12 Student Support Services Consultant NCDPI Curriculum & Instruction Division Career & College Ready Institute for School Counselors McKimmon Center, October 5, 2012 Description: The new NC Standard Course of Study includes NC Guidance Essential Standards

2 What do you need from today’s session?
Top 2-3 items: List each on a post it note Post-It Note Graffiti Obtain and discuss how will be met. 10 minutes for activity

3 At the end of this session, participants will:
Learn about DPI resources and tools to support the initiatives within the RttT Grant Understand the Guidance Essential Standards in order to meet the learning needs of all students Understand how using the ASCA National Model will create opportunities to implement a comprehensive data-driven school counseling program. Make Connections! The purpose of this session is to provide school counselors with information regarding NC Standard Course of Study which includes the new Common Core State Standards and the NC Essential State Standards as well as to increase awareness of the role of school counselors as leaders and advocates in supporting student learning and achievement . This information is important because it aligns with FRC Graduation Requirements and Career and College Readiness for NC students. The audience for this webinar is NC school counselors, administrators and central office supervisors who are working with school counselors in their district. The intent of sharing this information with school counselors is specifically to help meet their understanding of the NC Guidance Essential Standards and how to begin implementation of these standards through communication and collaboration with administrators, parents, and students. Please recognize that is a transition year in many ways. All areas are implementing new standards, and it will take some time to adapt and adjust individual school counseling programs and general understanding as the standards are implemented.

4 NC School Counseling Wiki
NCDPI School Counseling WikiSpace NCDPI School Counseling LiveBinder Visit wiki and acquaint participants with sign in, listserv sign up, training materials, and standards and resources pages. (Walk-through Wiki organization) Go through the LiveBinder site Guidance Essential Standards Alignment with ASCA National Model Unpacking of the Standards What do the standards mean? Lesson Samples/Assessment Prototypes Formative Assessment Samples How do I know my students learned the skill(s)? Do I need to change/diversify how I teach the lesson(s)?

5 Graffiti Write What does a 21st Century Counselor Do?
Brainstorm & write as many ideas as possible on chart paper Post chart paper on the wall 4 posters = 2 minutes We will return to this later today to see how your knowledge changes

6 Framework for NC School Counseling
3rd Edition This is the graphic which explains the various components of the ASCA National Model. The ASCA National Model was revised through the 3rd edition. The diamond logo has been updated to reflect new language within each of the four components of the ASCA National Model. The themes of leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change surround the model and are infused throughout each of the four components. 6 6

7 Foundation 2nd Edition 3rd Edition
In looking at using the ASCA National Model to develop your comprehensive school counseling program, I just demonstrated part of the Foundation Diamond to you with the Program Focus. The Program Focus (vision & mission) of the NC School Counseling Program aligns with the State Board Mission. The Foundation component of the 3rd edition has been organized into three sections Program Focus Student Competencies Professional Competencies – we will not cover this section today All of the topics from the 2nd edition have been included within the three sections. We will cover the NC Professional Standards later today, The next few slides will show that the foundation and organization of the new guidance essential standards are rooted in the ASCA National Standards for students.

8 1. Program Focus Foundation
Beliefs Vision Mission Program Goals The focus of the school counseling program is established by defining beliefs and developing a vision statement, a mission statement and program goals. The school counseling vision and mission statement should align with the school’s vision and mission statement. Vision focuses on the preferred or desired future in terms of student outcomes. A vision statement describes a future where the school counseling goals and strategies are successfully achieved. While the belief and mission statement topics have few revisions, new topics of vision and program goals have been added.

9 GUIDING MISSION “The guiding mission of the North Carolina State Board of Education is that every public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st Century.” The Guiding Mission of the State Board of Education calls on us to prepare students for life in the 21st century. You will see this mission reflected in the goals and policies of the SBE and reflected in work at the state and local school system levels.

10 Vision of NC School Counselors NC State Board of Education, 2008
“The demands of twenty-first century education dictate new roles for school counselors. Schools need professional school counselors who are adept at creating systems for change and at building relationships within the school community. Professional School Counselors create nurturing relationships with students that enhance academic achievement and personal success as globally productive citizens in the twenty-first century. Utilizing leadership, advocacy, and collaboration, professional school counselors promote academic achievement and personal success by implementing a comprehensive school counseling program that encompasses areas of academic, career, and personal/social development for all students.” These statements are the Beliefs and Philosophy of NC School Counselors are a part of the NC Professional School Counseling standards adopted by the NC State Board of Education in These professional standards are the basis of our school counseling practice in NC, the guidance essential standards and our new school counseling evaluation instrument; leading to alignment with the SBE Mission

11 The new evaluation instrument which is based upon the NC Professional School Counseling Standards measures how school counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change to positively affect student achievement. Look at Handout or on Wiki space/LiveBinder to review the standards for school counselors

12 The new evaluation instrument measures how school counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change to positively affect student achievement.

13 NC K-12 Guidance Essential Standards
The Purpose of Standards: To define and communicate the knowledge and skills a student must master to be globally competitive. State Board of Education Goal: NC public schools will produce globally competitive students. Our new Standard Course of Study, for guidance, and for all areas directly aligns with this mission. This is our goal & purpose – our mission! Mission

14 Good News! 2011-2012 Graduation Rate
Highest graduation rate ever in NC 80.2 % = 89,126 students

15 Still Leaves… 21,975 From the class that did not graduate

16 DuFour ? What is the role of the SC?
Connections Abound! Connecting to Serve All not just for our students but as professionals ~ Each content area is a piece of the puzzle…we must collaborate to work together to make sure students are career and college ready as 21st century learners who practice the skills of problem solving, collaboration and reflective thinking for continuous improvement. What do we want students to learn? (NC Guidance Essential Standards) How will we know if they have learned it? (Data Literacy) How will we respond when they don’t learn it? (Connecting to Serve All Students) How will we respond when they already know it? (Connecting to Serve All Students) DuFour ?

17 NC Standard Course of Study
Common Core State Standards English Language Arts (and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects) Mathematics NC Essential Standards Arts Education Career and Technical Education English Language Development* Guidance* Healthful Living (Health & Physical Education) Information and Technology* Science Social Studies World Languages The Framework for Change movement brought us to retooling the NC Public Education System The NC Standard Course of Study includes the following: Common Core State Standards 1. English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects 2. Mathematics North Carolina Essential Standards Arts Education Career and Technical Education English Language Development* Guidance* Healthful Living (Health and Physical Education) Information and Technology* Science Social Studies World Languages *Note: English Language Development Standards and Information and Technology Essential Standards must be delivered through ALL content areas. Teachers must ensure collaboration with AIG, EC, and ESL teachers to design and deliver appropriate services and standards for students. Information and Technology Essential Standards are to be delivered by classroom teachers in all curriculum areas and grade levels. Classroom teachers, media coordinators and technology facilitators must also collaborate for this purpose. It is expected and intended that all school staff will be informed about and ready to implement the Guidance Standards as they relate to the classroom, under the leadership of school counselor staff. Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted Program Standards Note: The NC AIG Program Standards serve as a statewide framework and guide LEAs to develop, coordinate, and implement thoughtful and comprehensive local AIG programs. These standards honor local flexibility and context. Extended Content Standards Note: The No Child Left Behind Act requires that all students, including those with the most significant cognitive disabilities, have access to the standard course of study at grade level. The extended content standards provide entry point extensions so that all students have meaningful and functional access to grade level standards. These standards should be used to develop goals, learning experiences and materials for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. Occupational Course of Study Common Core State Standards and North Carolina Essential Standards Note: The Occupational Course of Study (OCS) is intended to meet the needs of a small group of students with disabilities who need a modified curriculum that focuses on post-school employment and independent living. The vast majority of students with disabilities will complete the Future-Ready Core Course of Study with accommodations, modifications, supplemental aids and other services as needed. The OCS is a modified standard course of study with 15 courses in English, mathematics, science, occupational preparation and social studies. • Students are required to complete career/technical education credits, healthful living, and electives to complete local graduation requirements. • Each student must complete 300 hours of school-based vocational training, 240 hours of community-based vocational training, and 360 hours of paid employment. • Each student must complete a career portfolio documenting completion of course of study requirements. • The IEP Team, which includes parents and the student, makes recommendations as to the appropriateness of the OCS for a particular student based on his/her post-school transition needs and goals. Final selection of the OCS is by student and parent choice. Framework for Change lead to Retooling NC Public Education System

18 NC School Counselors… Design data-driven comprehensive school counseling programs that promote student achievement. Deliver programs that are comprehensive in scope, preventive in design and developmental in nature. Are accountable for assuring that every student has the opportunity to learn, achieve and graduate college and career ready. This is the Vision for School Counseling in NC, “In today’s globally competitive world, innovative thinking and building relationships are essential for all school children. High quality, standards-based instruction develops these skills and effectively engages, retains, and prepares future-ready students for graduation and success in an entrepreneurial economy. School Counselors are highly trained educators who serve as leaders in their schools, advocates for students, and facilitators of the integration of the school counseling program and the guidance curriculum in their schools. All of these are critical to North Carolina’s 21st century education.”

19 2. Student Competencies Foundation
ASCA Student Standards Other Student Standards (NC Guidance Essential Standards) ASCA Student Standards - The ASCA Student Standards identify and prioritize the specific knowledge, attitudes and skills that all students should be able to demonstrate as a result of the school counseling program. These standards were previously referred to as the National Standards. The title has changed, but there has been no change to the academic, career and personal/social domains nor to the competencies and indicators. These standards are likely to be revised over the next year. Other Student Standards - States and district initiatives often contain educational standards other than the ASCA Student Standards. This topic has been added to provide school counselors with flexibility to consider how these additional standards complement and inform their school counseling program. When appropriate, school counselors may select competencies from these other standards that align with the ASCA Student Standards and support the school counseling mission and goals. Examples include: Framework for 21st Century Learning The National Career Development Guidelines The Six Pillars of Character State standards - GES

20 Understanding & Implementing the NC Guidance Essential Standards

21 Review of Implementing New Standards: The Big Picture
How I teach this standard How this standard is reflected in student behavior/work How this standard is assessed: formative benchmark summative Connections Differentiation How are you planning to implement….Think about implementing the new essential standards at the classroom level – planning for instruction must include thought about 1) how the standard is taught, 2) how the standard is reflected in student work, 3) how the standard is assessed, 4) how the standard connects to other areas of the curriculum, to 21 century themes and skills, etc. and 5) how the standard may be differentiated for special populations (such as AIG, ELL, and EC) and/or multiple entry points. What do we want students to learn? (SI 2011) This is the center part of the graphic – the standards themselves are what we want students to know and learn. This was the focus from last summer. How will we know if they have learned it? (SI 2012 – Data Literacy) This is reflected in the big pieces surrounding the standard. Assessment let’s us know whether students have learned the standards or not, which informs our instruction, and how students reflect their learning through their work. If time allows: Discuss balanced assessment (add talking points) How will we respond when they don’t learn it? (SI 2012 – Connecting to Serve All Students) This is where differentiation for different types of learners is essential. How will we respond when they already know it? (SI 2012 – Connecting to Serve All Students) This, too, is where differentiation for different types of learners is essential. Connections were the focus of the Summer Institutes and the RESA trainings and will continue to be an important part of implementing the standards for all areas. Connections Framework?

22 Reflection Login into your penzu.com account, use MSWord or “ole fashion paper/pen” Answer the following questions & share I think some of the benefits of implementing the NC Guidance Essential Standards are:_____________________ My major concerns about implementing the Guidance Essential Standards are: ________ Facilitator can pick any activity to get audience to reflect on information given thus far. – 6 minutes for activity

23 Both are Student Centered
Program Focus: Student Competencies NC Guidance Essential Standards Alignment with National Standards for Students ASCA Student Competencies NC Guidance Essential Standards “Identify and prioritize the specific attitudes, knowledge and skills students should be able to demonstrate as a result of the school counseling program” ASCA National Model, 3rd Edition “The ultimate goal for 21st Century students is to be informed about the knowledge and skills that prepare them to be lifelong learners in a global context” GES Preamble, 2011 We are continuing in the Program Focus area with the Student Competencies from the ASCA National Model This slide indicates the goal of the student competencies of both the American School Counselor Association and the NC Guidance Essential Standards. Both are student centered focusing on knowledge and skills students should be able to demonstrate in order to be lifelong learners in a global context. Both are Student Centered

24 Organizational Alignment with ASCA National Standards for Students
ASCA National Model NC Guidance Essential Standards Domains: Personal/Social, Academic & Career Strands: Socio-Emotional, Cognitive & Career Standards for Students Standards for Students – 9 total Student Competencies Proficiency Levels - 5 total Indicators Clarifying Objectives

25 Crosswalk of K-12 Guidance Essential Standards
ASCA National Competencies for Students NC K-12 Guidance Essential Standards for Students Personal-Social Academic Career Socio-Emotional Cognitive Career Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Proficiency Levels Readiness/Exploratory/Discovery (RED) Early Emergent/Emergent (EEE) Progressing (P) Early Independent (EI) Independent (I) Proficiency levels instead of grade levels. The proficiency levels align with Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. Please keep in mind that the proficiency levels are developmental in nature which means they are intertwined and circular not an up/down hierarchy like grade levels where a student must be proficient at one level before moving to the next.

26

27 Preamble - IMPORTANT Overview, purpose & goals of the standards
Organization and Structure Based upon the ASCA Standards for Students and Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Not grade level but developmentally appropriate based upon proficiency levels of students Expectation that all school staff will be knowledgeable of the standards and ready to implement Guiding Question What do students need to know, understand and be able to do to ensure their success in the future, whether it be the next class, post-secondary study, the military or the world of work? (CCR)

28 Understanding the Guidance Essential Standards
Preamble – Review the overview and purpose Candy Teams – Discuss item from Preamble on your table and be ready to share with group M&M’s Reese Cups Twix 3 Musketeers Hersey Kisses Carmel Candy Divide into groups and discuss these topics as they relate to the Preamble and implementing the Guidance Essential Standards. 10 minutes to discuss the assigned Question as a group minutes to share

29 Preamble Candy M & Ms = Philosophy Twix = Purpose
3 Musketeers = Course of Study & Organization Carmel Candy = Program Description, National Standards & Research Hersey Kisses = Features Divide into groups and discuss these topics as they relate to the Preamble and implementing the Guidance Essential Standards.

30 NC Guidance Essential Standards
Essential Standards are fewer yet deeper in content and what the student is to know, understand and be able to demonstrate. Also, these standards like Instructional Technology/Media are to be embedded within the other curriculum areas to offer students a balanced education in lifelong learning in order to be career and college ready.

31 GES Poster by Proficiency Level
Standards Proficiency Levels Clarifying Objectives by Proficiency Level Strands Many of you may remember our old Guidance Curriculum. It was divided by level (elem, middle and high) and was in a huge notebook or many cd’s electronically. This poster is a tool that summarizes on one place the NC Guidance Essential Standards. The actual NCDPI Guidance Essential Standards document may be found on the SC LiveBinder and the ACRE/Ready website. The poster outlines the new Guidance Essential Standards. Remember, the standards are fewer and deeper and they are K-12 standards with the proficiency levels which means they are developmentally appropriate for individual students no matter the grade On this poster, you will see the following: Lists the Proficiency Levels at the top and the RBT levels that align with each proficiency level at the bottom. Also, there are a few of the RBT verbs listed to assist you in determining the knowledge dimension of the student. Also listed are the 3 Strands, the standards within each strand and the clarifying objectives by proficiency level for each strand. This poster will be very helpful when you are working with other counselors and student support services staff, career development coordinators, teachers in their Professional Learning Communities, your administrators, parents, and students. You may order this poster from the NCDPI Publications Dept. They have an online catalogue and come in bundles of 10 posters for $8. Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy

32 Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy

33 Higher-order thinking
REVISED BLOOM’S TAXONOMY Creating Generating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing things Designing, constructing, planning, producing, inventing.   Evaluating Justifying a decision or course of action Checking, hypothesizing, critiquing, experimenting, judging    Analyzing Breaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationships Comparing, organizing, deconstructing, interrogating, finding   Applying Using information in another familiar situation Implementing, carrying out, using, executing   Understanding Explaining ideas or concepts Interpreting, summarizing, paraphrasing, classifying, explaining   Remembering Recalling information Recognizing, listing, describing, retrieving, naming, finding Dr. Lorin W. Anderson Higher-order thinking Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy – This chart helps you to understand what a student is able to understand and do at the various levels along the taxonomy. However, it does not mean this is the level they are at in every strand or standard. This is truly a developmental model and may be different from student to student and within each student from topic to topic.

34 RBT Verbs R/E/D E/EE P EI I Remember Understand Apply Analyze Evaluate
Remember Understand Apply Analyze Evaluate Create name tell list describe relate write find predict explain outline discuss restate translate Compare solve show illustrate complete examine use classify examine compare contrast investigate categorize identify explain choose decide recommend assess justify rate prioritize create invent compose plan construct design imagine R/E/D E/EE P EI I

35 Analyzing, Evaluating, Creating
Higher Order Thinking Analyzing, Evaluating, Creating Aligns with GES Proficiency levels Early Independent Independent Students must get to higher order thinking to be career and college ready! Higher Order thinking skills are more complex and students own some responsibility for their learning process.

36 Analyzing Breaking information down into its component elements
Complete a Decision Making Matrix to help you make an important decision Role Play Construct a graph to illustrate selected information Design a questionnaire to gather information Breaking information down into its component elements Directions for activity – Counselors think of a concept they teach within their essential standards. Decide how to incorporate one of the analyzing activities into the lesson or unit.

37 Evaluating Activities and Products Write a letter to the editor
Prepare and conduct a debate Evaluate the character’s actions in the story Write a persuasive speech arguing for/against…

38 Creating Activities and Products
Write about your feelings in relation to… Write a TV show, play, puppet show, or pantomime about… Design a CD, book, or magazine cover for… Sell an idea

39 Diving Deeper Guidance Essential Standards

40 Understanding the Structure of the Guidance Essential Standards
Proficiency Levels Proficiency Levels align with RBT Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy

41 Our Guiding Question? What do students need to know, understand and be able to do, to ensure their success in the future, whether it is to continue with current study from grade-to-grade level or post- secondary college or career? Read aloud! Emphasis on students and skills students are to accomplish!

42 Example: Essential Standard Readiness/Explorator/Discovery: RED. SE
Example: Essential Standard Readiness/Explorator/Discovery: RED.SE.1 Understand the meaning and importance of personal responsibility. Clarifying Objective: Understand the importance of self-control and responsibility. Activity: Your best friend tells a lie about you to several of your friends. Describe how this makes you feel. Draw a picture showing how this made you feel. List three (3) things you can do in this situation to help you control your emotions. Example of same standard at 2 different levels – notice the skill level differences End of activity is your “post assessment” for the activity of the proficiency level – did the student “get it”?

43 Example: Essential Standard Early Emergent/Emergent: EEE. SE
Example: Essential Standard Early Emergent/Emergent: EEE.SE.1 Understand the meaning and importance of personal responsibility. Clarifying Objective: Contrast appropriate and inappropriate physical contact. Activity: A student keeps purposefully bumping into you each time that student sees you. This behavior is now making you uncomfortable. List some ways you can approach this student and express how this behavior makes you feel. Demonstrate to me what you consider to be your “personal space”. Role Play how you can approach and talk with student. Example of same standard at 2 different levels – notice the skill level differences End of activity is your “post assessment” for the activity of the proficiency level – did the student “get it”?

44 Example: Essential Standard Progressing: P. SE
Example: Essential Standard Progressing: P.SE.1 Understand the meaning and importance of personal responsibility. Clarifying Objective: Identify how to set boundaries that maintain personal rights while paying attention to the rights of others. Activity: You have been divided into groups in your class. As a group leader, you made the team assignments, but one member is not joining the group and fulfilling his duties. List some approaches you might use to address this student? Identify how this student’s actions are affecting others in the group. Explain how the student is not demonstrating responsibility to the group? Develop an action plan as a group that would help everyone get involved. Example of same standard at 2 different levels – notice the skill level differences End of activity is your “post assessment” for the activity of the proficiency level – did the student “get it”?

45 Example: Essential Standard Early Independent: EI. SE
Example: Essential Standard Early Independent: EI.SE.1 Understand the meaning and importance of personal responsibility. Clarifying Objective: Explain the impact of personal responsibility on others. Activity: You are with two friends when a third friend asks you to steal an item off the lunch line. How would you categorize this behavior (stealing)? What function will your personal values play in your decision making about this request? Analyze how your decision in this matter could affect your future. Analyze here vs. list with the other one

46 Example: Essential Standard Independent: I. SE
Example: Essential Standard Independent: I.SE.1 Understand the meaning and importance of personal responsibility. Clarifying Objective: Understand the importance of self-control and responsibility. Activity: Your classmate who is the class representative has a reputation for not being hones and not following through on promises. He asked you to chair a committee to examine the school’s discipline code. You are undecided about how to answer because of reputation. Explain your decision in terms of personal responsibility and leadership. Predict (hypothesize) your classmate’s reaction. How would you justify your decision while maintaining a positive relationship with your classmate? Example of same standard at 2 different levels – notice the skill level differences End of activity is your “post assessment” for the activity of the proficiency level – did the student “get it”?

47 Level Group Activity Divide into level groups – elementary, middle, high Complete the NCGES worksheet with school counseling and guidance activities you are already doing that meets the objectives in the standard.

48

49 Understanding the Standards
Beach Ball Activity S – choose a strand/standard and read aloud CO/PL – read aloud a clarifying objective & proficiency level within this standard then state one PL verb for this specific CO A – describe a counseling activity using the proficiency level verb that might help a student understand this standard and clarifying objective Optional Activity: Need 3 beach balls with the letters marked on them. Facilitator tosses each to a different person in the group to participate with answering the item portrayed by the letter on the ball. The second and third person receiving the beach balls, follow up in response to the person who responded ahead of them to demonstrate how the standards, proficiency levels, clarifying objectives and school counseling/guidance activities align.

50 NC School Counseling Wiki
NCDPI School Counseling WikiSpace NCDPI School Counseling LiveBinder Visit wiki and acquaint participants with sign in, listserv sign up, training materials, and standards and resources pages. (Walk-through Wiki organization) Go through the LiveBinder site Guidance Essential Standards Alignment with ASCA National Model Unpacking of the Standards What do the standards mean? Lesson Samples/Assessment Prototypes Formative Assessment Samples How do I know my students learned the skill(s)? Do I need to change/diversify how I teach the lesson(s)?

51 Delivery 2nd Edition 3rd Edition
The Delivery component of the 3rd edition has been organized into two sections Direct Services Indirect Services The changes in this component are likely to get the most attention in the 3rd edition.

52 80% It is recommended that a school counselor spend 80% or more of their time in the delivery of a comprehensive school counseling program and 20% or less in foundation, management, accountability and fair share responsibilities. Test Coordination is not delivery. We will discuss the Delivery component later today. School counselors can use the suggested percentages of time if they find them helpful but it is recommended that they make these decisions based on student needs as demonstrated through school data.

53 With Students For Students Delivery
Direct Student Services In-person interactions with students Indirect Student Services Interactions with others With Students For Students The 3rd edition provides more specific definitions of direct and indirect student services. Direct student services are face-to-face with students. Indirect student services are provided on behalf of students through interactions with others.

54 Examples of Direct Student Services Delivery
(NC Guidance Essential Standards) SC Core Curriculum Individual Student Planning Responsive Services School Counseling Core Curriculum – Previously called the Guidance Curriculum. This curriculum consists of a planned, written instructional program that is comprehensive in scope, preventative in nature and developmental in design. It is delivered through instruction and group activities. Individual Student Planning – School counselors assist students as they evaluate educational, career and personal goals. Strategies include appraisal and advisement. Responsive Services – Includes activities designed to meet students’ immediate needs and concerns. Strategies include counseling in individual or group settings or crisis response.

55 Examples of Indirect Student Services Delivery
Referrals Consultation Collaboration School counselors provide indirect services as a means to support student achievement and promote equity and access for all students. Strategies include referrals, consultation and collaboration.

56 Framework for NC School Counseling
3rd Edition This is the graphic which explains the various components of the ASCA National Model. The ASCA National Model was revised through the 3rd edition. The diamond logo has been updated to reflect new language within each of the four components of the ASCA National Model. The themes of leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change surround the model and are infused throughout each of the four components. 56 56

57 Management 2nd Edition 3rd Edition
The Management component of the 3rd edition has been organized into two sections Assessments Tools All of the topics from the 2nd edition have been included within the two sections and new tools have been added to support implementation.

58 Assessments p. 59 Program Assessment/Audit
The School Counseling Program Assessment is a revision of the Program Audit from the 2nd edition. The title was changed from audit to assessment as audit implies an outside auditor, and assessment implies an internal review. The assessment has been condensed and streamlined compared to the previous version.

59 Assessments p. 63 Use of Time Assessment
The Use of Time Assessment was created to assist school counselors analyze their use of time. It is recommended that school counselors assess their use of time at least 2 weeks during each school year, such as one week in the fall and one in the spring.

60 Assessments Management
The School Counselor Competencies Assessment helps school counselors self-assess their knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to perform the range of responsibilities in all four components of a comprehensive school counseling program. The competencies can be used in a variety of ways, including: School Counselors – Self-assess their own competencies and develop a plan professional development School Administrators – Guide recruitment and selection of school counselors and develop or inform meaningful school counselor performance appraisal School Counselor Education Programs – Establish benchmarks for ensuring school counseling students graduate with the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed for developing a comprehensive school counseling program

61 Curriculum Lesson Plan
Tools Management Annual Agreement Advisory Council Calendars Curriculum Lesson Plan School Data Profile New Minor Changes Annual Agreement – This was previously called the Management Agreement. In some states, the term “management” caused some complications, so the title was changed to alleviate the problem and to emphasize that the agreement should be updated each year. There are a few minor updates to the form. Advisory Council – Additional information was included to help school counselors develop and implement an advisory council. It is recommended that the advisory council meet at least two times per year, with an agenda and minutes for each meeting. Calendars – It is recommended that there be one annual calendar for the program. In addition, each school counselor creates and makes available a weekly calendar that includes information about their activities for the week. Two new tools have been added (see next slides) Curriculum Lesson Plan School Data Profile

62 School Data Profile Template p. 66
New The school data profile can be used to help school counselors organize and disaggregate data, particularly if the school’s student information system does not produce reports in a disaggregated format. This tool is designed to help school counselors track achievement, attendance, behavior and school safety data for multiple years to identify any gaps or issues of equity at the school. Data for this document is frequently pulled from existing data sources or student information systems at the school.

63 Lesson Plan Template A lesson plan template has been included in the 3rd edition. It includes the ASCA Student Standards chosen to guide the lesson and offers a place to indicate what data will be collected for the lesson. School counselors can’t collect data on all lessons, but should collect data on some lessons, particularly those that are closely related to important initiatives and program goals.

64 You could have counselors review one of the school counseling activities listed on your worksheet then have them work in small groups to complete a draft lesson plan for the selected activity.

65 Action Plan Templates p. 69
Curriculum Small Group Closing the Gap Page 70 – 72 There have been minor revisions to the curriculum and closing the gap action plan templates. However, a small group action plan template has been created to help school counselors organize and facilitate small groups.

66 Important Tool for Shared Vision
Annual Agreement/Work Plan Important Tool for Shared Vision Develop preliminary school counseling program based upon data & School Improvement Plan (SIP) Meet with Administrator to discuss & finalize goals & plan for the school year Goals/Plan should support student achievement, align with SIP and School Counselor evaluation instrument Template handout on Wikispace

67 Page 64

68 Accountability 2nd Edition 3rd Edition
The Accountability component of the 3rd edition has been organized into three sections Data Analysis Program Results Evaluation and Improvement All of the topics from the 2nd edition have been included within the three sections and new topics have been added.

69 Strategies leading to Skill development or Behavior Change
Types of Data Process Data What did you do for whom? Perception Data What do people think they know, believe or can do? Strategies: goals & objectives Outcome/Results Data So what? – “Show Me The Money” How Many affected & process Competency-Skill Attainment Data Strategies leading to Skill development or Behavior Change Achievement-Related Data Achievement Data Guidance Lessons, groups, parent meetings, etc. Who? What? When? Where? How long? Attitudes Skills Knowledge Attendance Discipline referrals Parent Involvement Homework Completion Course Enrollment Failing courses EOG/EOC SAT/ACT Graduation rates GPA AP tests College prep and CTE course completion Retention rates Student Achievement Data Measures students’ academic progress Achievement Related Data Measures data related to academic achievement Standards and competency related data Measures student competency Disaggregate Data Separation of data by variables to see if there are groups of students who may not be doing as well as others. Evaluate the process, change in student’s attitudes, skills and knowledge; behavior change – did it meet our goals & objectives, review and move to more concrete systemic change data or results/outcomes with achievement related data then the actual achievement assessment/test data.

70 Comprehensive School Counseling Program Assessment
Process Data Percentage of time spent in non-counseling duties Number of individual counseling session/month Number of mental health team consultations Perception Data Knowledge gained before compared to after an intervention (pre & post) 74% of students feel that fighting is wrong Every student 9-12 has completed a 4 year graduation plan Outcome Data Retention rates by grade level Graduation rates by SES Graduation rates improved 14% over three years Expulsion rates by ethnicity Results data Evaluation data shows how the school counseling program has impacted students’ academic achievement, their personal social skills, and/or their career readiness skills. Together these data types tell how a program is impacting students. Impact on Student Achievement

71 School Counselors: Leaders in School Improvement Planning D3M (Data-driven Decision Making)
Transition – in and out (transition between levels/graduation) Intervention – Attendance/Academic Recovery/Socio-Emotional Academic – course rigor; promotion from grade to grade; and to graduate career & college ready Data – school-wide; data needed by PLCs; school improvement data; assisting others in selecting and using appropriate data Teacher Retention/Recruitment – collaboration and support efforts of the teachers since “high quality teaching yields high performing students” Some examples of school counselors as leaders and advocates with data to support activities of the school counseling comprehensive program.

72 Evaluation & Improvement Accountability
(NC Professional School Counseling Standards, 2008) SC Competencies Assessment SC Program Assessment & Analysis showing Program Outcomes/Results (NC School Counselor Evaluation Instrument) SC Performance Appraisal Tips are included to help school counselors analyze their school counselor competencies assessment and program assessment. A performance appraisal template aligned with the ASCA National Model is included. This may be especially helpful for districts or states that do not have a specific performance appraisal instrument for school counselors. NC does have the 2008 Professional School Counseling Standards and the new Professional School Counselor Evaluation which is being piloted in with full implementation next year.

73 Samples on pages 114-116 of ASCA National Model Book

74 The new evaluation instrument which is based upon the NC Professional School Counseling Standards measures how school counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change to positively affect student achievement. Look at Handout or on Wiki space/LiveBinder to review the standards for school counselors

75 No Standard 6 NC Professional School Counseling Standards
The performance evaluation is based on the 2008 NC Professional School Counseling Standards Standard 1 – School counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, and collaboration. Standard 2 – School counselors promote a respectful environment for a diverse population of students. Standard 3 – School counselors understand and facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program. Standard 4 – School counselors promote learning for all students Standard 5 – School counselors actively reflect on their practice. No Standard 6 School Counselors are to be leaders in their schools, advocates for all students to positively affect systemic change!

76

77 Performance Appraisal Ratings
Developing – an awareness or some knowledge Proficient – demonstrating/doing - implementation of standard …WOOHOO! You are a good counselor… able to do all that you are being asked to do on a routine basis Accomplished – mentor other counselors or share components of counseling program within school/district Distinguished – “one in a million type of work” - able to share successful strategies, programs you/team developed on a wide-scale basis such as district, state or nationally ******************************************************************************* Not evidenced – professional area to work on developing Artifacts=Evidence Paradigm shift in our thinking – Proficient is GREAT! We are doing our job. You will be able to demonstrate the how students are different as a result of the school counseling program. Artifacts = evidence! Start your portfolio of how you are affecting student achievement, supporting your school’s mission/vision, School Improvement Plan, collaborating with school staff and key stakeholders, etc.

78 School Counselor…role of School Leader & Advocate
Leadership: Stepping up in support of the academic mission; a facilitative leader Advocacy: Being a voice for ALL students/equity for each student. Acting with students and on behalf of students Collaboration: Creating a responsive system for all students and stakeholders/not done in isolation School Counselor Roles - How do school counselors do this yet remain true to their profession? We are at our best when making connections! What we have been trained to do! Connected Counselors create Systemic Change

79 Graffiti Write Return to your group’s chart paper
Use different colored dots to categorize 21st professional behaviors that align with the components of the ASCA National Model.

80 Dot Legend RED Foundation GREEN Delivery YELLOW Management
BLUE Accountability

81 Where Do I Begin? Use the ASCA National Model
Where are we going? Where are we now? How do we close the gap? Where Do I Begin? Use the ASCA National Model Review and learn the Guidance Essential Standards Start implementation planning in curriculum areas where there are natural alignments? Review your school’s data What are the areas of need indicated by the data? Gaps? Use SIP! How do the needs align with the SIP? 81

82 Review all information with your administrator
Where are we going? Where are we now? How do we close the gap? Review all information with your administrator Develop a program to include in the annual agreement Analyze Outcome Results Data & Publicize Align program to meet SC Evaluation Program Planning Assure other curriculum areas understand the Guidance Essential Standards Work with teachers through PLC’s/PLT’s Include Direct and Indirect Services to Students Align with SIP goals of the school & district 82

83 Plan for Implementation of the Guidance Essential Standards
Work in your LEA group to complete this plan…Share time with full group

84 Questions? Linda Brannan

85 Useful Websites School Counseling Wikispace: NCDPI School Counseling LiveBinders – link to this site from the wikispace NC Falcon: note the Professional Development tab on the left – formative assessments NC Education: RBT video https://center.ncsu.edu/nc/login/index.php American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

86 References & Resources
ASCA National Model: Framework for School Counseling (3rd ed.) (2012)., American School Counselors Association. Alexandria, VA Dahir, C.A. & Stone, C.B. (2012) The transformed school counselor (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Dimmitt, C., Carey, J.C. & Hatch, T. (2007). Evidence-based school counseling: Making a difference with data-driven practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press Ehren, B. EdD, Montgomery, J., PhD, Rudebusch, J., EdD, Whitmire, K., PhD, New Roles in Response to Intervention: Creating Success for Schools and Children, November 2006 RTI Action Network. Retrieved June3, J2ZMCFQEQGgodmTvPaA Shaprio, E. S. Tiered Instruction and Intervention in a Response-to-Intervention Model. Retrieved June 5, 2008 Young, A., & Kaffenberger, C. (2009). Making Data Work. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselors Association

87 “The digital tools used during the course of this training have been helpful to some educators across the state.  However, due to the rapidly changing digital environment, NCDPI does not represent nor endorse that these tools are the exclusive digital tools for the purposes outlined during the training.”


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