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School Counselors Evaluation Validation Study Training

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Presentation on theme: "School Counselors Evaluation Validation Study Training"— Presentation transcript:

1 School Counselors Evaluation Validation Study Training
Linda Brannan K-12 Student Support Services Consultant Curriculum & Instruction Cynthia Martin Professional Development Leads Education Recruitment & Development

2 School Counseling Wikispace
You may find all the materials from this training session at: and on NCEES wikispaces

3 Appreciation to Development Team
Professional School Counselors Administrators Evaluation Development Team School Counseling Standards Team Appreciation to the Development Team. Worked since 2008 to develop the NC Professional School Counseling Standards and the new School Counselor Evaluation Rubric that tightly aligns with the 2008 SBE approved NC Professional School Counseling Standards.

4 Participants Will Gain Knowledge Of:
The 2008 NC Professional School Counseling Standards The purpose of the new School Counselor Evaluation Rubric The rating scale of the new rubric Resources

5 NC Professional School Counseling Standards
Professional Standards adopted in by the SBE aligned to national framework New evaluation rubric standards align tightly to these 2008 NC Professional School Counseling Standards Familiarize self with these standards as these are the ones school counselors will be evaluated

6 The new evaluation instrument which is based upon the NC Professional School Counseling Standards measures how school counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change to positively affect student achievement. Look at Handout or on Wiki space/LiveBinder to review the standards for school counselors

7 The new evaluation instrument measures how school counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change to positively affect student achievement.

8 Vision of NC School Counselors NC State Board of Education, 2008
“The demands of twenty-first century education dictate new roles for school counselors. Schools need professional school counselors who are adept at creating systems for change and at building relationships within the school community. Professional School Counselors create nurturing relationships with students that enhance academic achievement and personal success as globally productive citizens in the twenty-first century. Utilizing leadership, advocacy, and collaboration, professional school counselors promote academic achievement and personal success by implementing a comprehensive school counseling program that encompasses areas of academic, career, and personal/social development for all students.” These statements are the Beliefs and Philosophy of NC School Counselors which are a part of the NC Professional School Counseling standards adopted by the NC State Board of Education in These professional standards are the basis of our school counseling practice in NC, the guidance essential standards and our new school counseling evaluation instrument; leading to alignment with the SBE Mission. Based on 21st Century Skills and the national standards for school counseling from the ASCA.

9 Graffiti Write What does a 21st century school counselor do?
Use chart to brainstorm List as many ideas as possible

10 Shifts … Then…. “Guidance Counselor” Random Student Support Services
Go-to person at school for other, non-counseling related duties Points and directs as a “Service oriented” professional in the schools Filled gaps for school service needs – test coordinator, planning period for teachers, duties, etc

11 Role of School Counselor in 21st Century Learning
New role supports 21st Century learning New role aligns with national standards from ASCA approved by SBE in 2008 Program services and curriculum align to Common Core and NC Essential State Standards Data-driven to support student achievement This reform was catalyst for change in roles. 21st Century learning. Focus no longer just on good grades in subjects, but now a wider focus on global awareness, financial literacy, information, media, and technology skills, and critical thinking. 2008—Now there is a connection…accountability We are at the table now. We are collaborating with others to find commonalities in how our curriculum is taught. Data is now apart of everything we do. It is the foundation for decision making and our evaluation instrument reflects it.

12 Now…. 21st Century School Counselor
Leadership Advocacy Collaboration Implements a data driven, comprehensive, developmental school counseling program to promote systemic change. Demonstrates leadership to develop a data driven comprehensive developmental school counseling program to promote student achievement. School counselors work with conditions that interfere with a student's social, emotional, and learning process. A school counselor encourages successful academic, career, and personal/social development to ensure every child succeeds. (advocacy) This is accomplished through a variety of methods but mainly through individual counseling, group counseling, and classroom guidance. School counselors also work collaboratively with students, teachers, parents, administration, and community members.

13 This graphic indicates some of the duties and roles the 21st Century school counselor might have in a school Stress: Membership of Leadership team Counseling PLCs Data-driven program Contributor to Profession Advisory Council

14 Graffiti Write Part II Distinguish roles on the chart
green dots (old role) red dots (new role) Post chart on wall Gallery Walk As you complete gallery walk, self reflect on if your counselors are 21st century “school counselors” (new role) or 19th century “guidance counselors” (old role)

15 Framework for NC School Counseling
The professional and student competencies of the American School Counselor Association are the framework for the 2008 NC Professional School Counseling Standards approved by the State Board of Education and the new School Counselor Evaluation Rubric. Therefore, the ASCA National Model is an excellent resource/tool to help develop and implement a data-driven, comprehensive school counseling program. Briefly go through each component relating it back to the skills (leadership, advocacy and collaboration) the 21st Century school counselor must use. This graphic explains the various components of the ASCA National Model. The diamond logo has been updated to reflect new language within each of the four components of the ASCA National Model indicated in the 3rd edition. The four components are: Foundation Delivery Management Accountability The themes of leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change surround the model and are infused throughout each of the four components. These themes are also major components and themes throughout the new School Counselor Evaluation Rubric. 15 15

16 Foundation 3rd Edition The ASCA National Model is the framework for the 2008 NC Professional School Counseling Standards and the new School Counselor Evaluation Rubric. To develop a comprehensive school counseling program, school counselors will start with the Foundation Diamond component which includes: Program Focus, Student Competencies and Professional Competencies. The Program Focus includes the vision & mission of the NC School Counseling Program (we just read) and this aligns with the State Board Mission. “The guiding mission of the North Carolina State Board of Education is that every public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st Century.”

17 2. Student Competencies Foundation
ASCA Student Standards Other Student Standards (NC Guidance Essential Standards) Student Competencies – second component of Foundation includes ASCA Student Standards - The ASCA Student Standards identify and prioritize the specific knowledge, attitudes and skills that all students should be able to demonstrate as a result of the school counseling program. These standards were previously referred to as the National Standards. The title has changed, but there has been no change to the academic, career and personal/social domains nor to the competencies and indicators. These standards are likely to be revised over the next year. Other Student Standards - States and district initiatives often contain educational standards other than the ASCA Student Standards. This topic has been added to provide school counselors with flexibility to consider how these additional standards complement and inform their school counseling program. When appropriate, school counselors may select competencies from these other standards that align with the ASCA Student Standards and support the school counseling mission and goals. Examples include: Framework for 21st Century Learning State standards - NC Guidance Essential Standards The National Career Development Guidelines The Six Pillars of Character

18 3. Professional Competencies Foundation - Program Focus
ASCA SC Competencies (NC Professional Standards for School Counseling & Evaluation) ASCA Ethical Standards Professional Competencies – third component of Foundation includes: ASCA School Counselor Competencies – The school counseling competencies are new to the ASCA National Model but not new to the profession. Developed in 2007, these competencies outline the knowledge, attitudes and skills that ensure school counselors are equipped to meet the rigorous demands of the school counseling profession and the needs of our preK-12 students. ASCA Ethical Standards – The Ethical Standards are also not new to the profession but are part of the foundation of the profession. These standards specify the principles of ethical behavior necessary to maintain the highest standard of integrity, leadership and professionalism. They guide school counselors’ decision making and help standardize professional practice to protect both students and school counselors. An ethical decision-making model is also included

19 Delivery 3rd Edition The Delivery component of the 3rd edition has been organized into two sections Direct Services Indirect Services

20 Examples of Direct Student Services Delivery
SC Core Curriculum (NC Guidance Essential Standards) Individual Student Planning Responsive Services School Counseling Core Curriculum – Previously called the Guidance Curriculum. This curriculum consists of the NC Guidance Essential Standards and is a planned, written instructional program that is comprehensive in scope, preventative in nature and developmental in design. It is delivered through instruction, group activities and is integrated across all curriculum areas in the school. Individual Student Planning – School counselors assist students as they evaluate educational, career and personal goals. Strategies include review of student circumstances, problem solving skills, decision making skills and advisement. Responsive Services – Includes activities designed to meet students’ immediate needs and concerns. Strategies include counseling in individual or group settings or crisis response.

21 Examples of Indirect Student Services Delivery
Referrals Consultation Collaboration School counselors provide indirect services as a means to support student achievement and promote equity and access for all students. Strategies include referrals, consultation and collaboration.

22 Management 2nd Edition 3rd Edition
The Management component of the 3rd edition has been organized into two sections Assessments Tools All of the topics from the 2nd edition have been included within the two sections and new tools have been added to support implementation.

23 1. Assessment Management
Program Audit Use of Time School Counselor Standards The School Counselor Competencies Assessment helps school counselors self-assess their knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to perform the range of responsibilities in all four components of a comprehensive school counseling program. The competencies can be used in a variety of ways, including: School Counselors – Self-assess their own competencies and develop a plan professional development School Administrators – Guide recruitment and selection of school counselors and develop or inform meaningful school counselor performance appraisal School Counselor Education Programs – Establish benchmarks for ensuring school counseling students graduate with the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed for developing a comprehensive school counseling program Minor Changes Annual Agreement – This was previously called the Management Agreement. In some states, the term “management” caused some complications, so the title was changed to alleviate the problem and to emphasize that the agreement should be updated each year. There are a few minor updates to the form. Advisory Council – Additional information was included to help school counselors develop and implement an advisory council. It is recommended that the advisory council meet at least two times per year, with an agenda and minutes for each meeting. Calendars – It is recommended that there be one annual calendar for the program. In addition, each school counselor creates and makes available a weekly calendar that includes information about their activities for the week. Two new tools have been added (see next slides) Curriculum Lesson Plan School Data Profile

24 Curriculum Lesson Plan
2. Tools Management Annual Agreement Advisory Council Calendars Curriculum Lesson Plan School Data Profile Annual Agreement – This was previously called the Management Agreement. In some states, the term “management” caused some complications, so the title was changed to alleviate the problem and to emphasize that the agreement should be updated each year. There are a few minor updates to the form. Advisory Council – Additional information was included to help school counselors develop and implement an advisory council. It is recommended that the advisory council meet at least two times per year, with an agenda and minutes for each meeting. Calendars – It is recommended that there be one annual calendar for the program. In addition, each school counselor creates and makes available a weekly calendar that includes information about their activities for the week.

25 Small Group Curriculum Closing the Gap Action Plan Templates
Action Plan templates are included as resources for counselors to use in planning programs based upon the needs indicated by the school’s data. Curriculum Lesson Plan – use with teachers in a Professional Learning Community to help with planning for implementation of the NC Guidance Essential Standards or for classroom guidance. Small Group – use to help school counselors organize and facilitate small groups with a chronic need for a few students such as with military students who are dealing with parents being deployed. Closing the Gap – use with students who have an academic need such as with increasing enrollment of minority students in honors/AP classes to increase course rigor

26 Accountability 3rd Edition
The Accountability component of the 3rd edition has been organized into three sections Data Analysis Program Results Evaluation and Improvement

27 Diving Deeper NC Professional School Counseling Standards

28 No Standard 6 or 8 NC Professional School Counseling Standards
The performance evaluation rubric is based on the 2008 NC Professional School Counseling Standards Standard 1 – School counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, and collaboration. Standard 2 – School counselors promote a respectful environment for a diverse population of students. Standard 3 – School counselors understand and facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program. Standard 4 – School counselors promote learning for all students Standard 5 – School counselors actively reflect on their practice. No Standard 6 or 8 Our standards mirror teacher standards. Review each of the standards – briefly as they will deep dive with activity School Counselors are to be leaders in their schools, advocates for all students to positively affect systemic change!

29 Standards Elements Ratings Descriptors

30 Performance Appraisal Ratings
Developing – an awareness or some knowledge Proficient – demonstrating/doing - implementation of standard. You are a good counselor who is able to meet the requirements of your job role on a routine basis Accomplished – mentor other counselors or share components of school counseling program within school/district Distinguished - able to share successful strategies, programs you/team developed on a wide-scale basis such as district, state or nationally ******************************************************************************* Not Demonstrated– professional area to work on developing Paradigm shift in our thinking – Proficient is GREAT! We are doing our job. You will be able to demonstrate the how students are different as a result of the school counseling program. Briefly show page in User Guide regarding “Scoring the Rubric” Artifacts = evidence! Examples of how school counselors and school counseling program are affecting student achievement, supporting your school’s mission/vision, School Improvement Plan, collaborating with school staff and key stakeholders, etc.

31 Standard 1 – School counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, and collaboration.
Four Elements: A. Demonstrate leadership in their school B. Enhance the counseling profession C. Advocate for schools and students D. Demonstrate high ethical standards

32 Standard 2 – School counselors promote a respectful environment for a diverse population of students
Five Elements: A. Promote a respectful environment for diverse population of students B. Embrace diversity in the school community and world C. Treat students as individuals

33 D. Recognize students are diverse and adapt their services accordingly
E. Work collaboratively with the families and significant adults in the lives of students

34 Standard 3 – School counselors understand and facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program Four Elements: A. Align their programs to support student success in the NC Standard Course of Study B. Understand how their professional knowledge and skills support and enhance student success

35 C. Recognize the interconnectedness of the comprehensive school counseling program with academic content areas/disciplines D. Develop comprehensive school counseling programs that are relevant to students

36 Standard 4 – School counselors promote learning for all students
Four Elements: A. Know how students learn B. Plan their programs for the academic, career and personal/social development of all students C. Use a variety of delivery methods D. Help students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills

37 Standard 5 – School counselors actively reflect on their practice.
Three Elements: A. Analyze the impact of the school counseling program B. Link professional growth to the needs of their school and their program goals C. Function effectively in a complex dynamic environment

38 Uniqueness Observations School Counseling Activities
Professional Growth Plan Observables vs. Nonobservables Observations-confidentiality; different from teachers’ observation because school counselors must abide by the ethical practices and laws of confidentiality School Counseling Activities – instead of lessons/lesson plans – school counselors are not teachers. They will not do lessons and lesson plans except when collaborating with teachers to implement the NC Guidance Essential standards across curriculum areas. Examples of school counseling activities include: SC program goals, small group counseling sessions, closing gap goals, etc. Professional Growth Plan / - counselors will do a PGP. It is very similar to the Annual Agreement referenced in the Evaluation Rubric that they create with their administrators Action Plan - LEA decision

39 Deeper Dive into the new School Counseling Standards
Divide into 5 groups (1 group/standard; may develop subgroups) Decide what the standard is about and not about Identify key ideas from the standard Identify where your standard falls according to ASCA National Model four quadrants Give each group the option of subgrouping into elements.

40 Deeper Dive Group Work Complete a poster or electronic presentation
Choose a speaker Group Share

41 Group Work Share Time Ideas
Each group will share the key ideas and features of the assigned standard Each group will teach others how to assess and resources to use when working with a school counselor based upon the standard, elements and rubric

42 Resources School Counselor Evaluation User Guide Appendices

43 Appendix A (p.32) ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs Forms and materials Framework for data-driven, comprehensive school counseling program Why are these things listed in the appendix? – Tools and resources to use to implement a data-driven, comprehensive school counseling program. Briefly review how the components of the school counselor evaluation relate to the ASCA Diamond. Pages 35, 40, 46, 49

44 Appendix C (p. 59) Code of Ethics Code of Ethics for NC Educators
Ethical Standards for School Counselors (ASCA) Ethical Standards for confidentiality – more detail in next slide

45 Highlight A.2. Confidentiality
B. 2. Responsibilities to Parents p.70 D. Responsibilities to School Communities and Families p.71 F. Responsibilities to the Profession p. 73 G. Maintenance of Standards p.74

46 Appendix D p.76 Using Evaluation Rubric
School Counselor Evaluation Rubric Forms

47 School Counseling Wikispace
Exit Survey School Counseling Wikispace Exit Survey is on the Wikispace in the Training Agenda

48 Questions? Linda Brannan Cynthia Martin

49 Useful Websites School Counseling Wikispace: NCDPI School Counseling LiveBinders – link to this site from the wikispace American School Counselor Association (ASCA) NC Falcon: note the Professional Development tab on the left – formative assessments NC Education: RBT video https://center.ncsu.edu/nc/login/index.php

50 References & Resources
ASCA National Model: Framework for School Counseling (3rd ed.) (2012)., American School Counselors Association. Alexandria, VA Dahir, C.A. & Stone, C.B. (2012) The transformed school counselor (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Dimmitt, C., Carey, J.C. & Hatch, T. (2007). Evidence-based school counseling: Making a difference with data-driven practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press Ehren, B. EdD, Montgomery, J., PhD, Rudebusch, J., EdD, Whitmire, K., PhD, New Roles in Response to Intervention: Creating Success for Schools and Children, November 2006 RTI Action Network. Retrieved June3, J2ZMCFQEQGgodmTvPaA Shaprio, E. S. Tiered Instruction and Intervention in a Response-to-Intervention Model. Retrieved June 5, 2008 Young, A., & Kaffenberger, C. (2009). Making Data Work. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselors Association

51 “The digital tools used during the course of this training have been helpful to some educators across the state.  However, due to the rapidly changing digital environment, NCDPI does not represent nor endorse that these tools are the exclusive digital tools for the purposes outlined during the training.”

52 NCDPI Contact Linda Brannan School Counseling Consultant
NC Department of Public Instruction Division of K-12 Curriculum and Instruction


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