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Introduction to Architecture. “Reading” architecture requires us to allow buildings to “speak” to us. But how can inanimate objects speak to us? Especially.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Architecture. “Reading” architecture requires us to allow buildings to “speak” to us. But how can inanimate objects speak to us? Especially."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Architecture

2 “Reading” architecture requires us to allow buildings to “speak” to us. But how can inanimate objects speak to us? Especially if those objects are not representational?

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8 Pentre Ifan Burial Chamber, 2000 BCE

9 John Portman, Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles

10 Richard Neutra, Edgar J. Kaufmann House, Palm Springs, 1946.

11 According to Vitruvius (Marcus Vitruvius Pollio, 1 st cent. BCE), in De Architectura a building must be considered in terms of three elements: Utilitas Firmitas Venustas

12 Utilitas  need  function  plan Firmitas  means  structure  section Venustas  art  beauty  elevation

13 Utilitas  need  function  plan

14 Firmitas  means  structure  section

15 Venustas  art  beauty  elevation

16 Utilitas as Message: TWA Terminal, JFK Transamerica Bldg. SF, CA

17 Utilitas by Addition: Louis Kahn’s Richards Medical Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania

18 Utilitas by Division:

19 Urge towards symmetry:

20 Firmitas/Stucture will always be a function of: Advances in engineering Availability and strength of materials Cost available for materials Other historical and geographical factors “Architecture is the adaptation of form to resist force.” John Ruskin (19 th c.)

21 All structures seek a balance between tension and compression. Traditionally there were two ways to handle this: through trabeated structures or through arcuated structures.

22 Trabeated Structures

23 CANTILEVER Milstein Hall, Cornell University (Rem Kolhaas) Gale House, Oak Partk, IL (Frank Lloyd Wright)

24 Villa Savoye, Poissy, France. LeCorbusier.

25 ARCUATED STRUCTURES Colosseum, Rome. Hagia Sophia, Instanbul

26 Venustas  art  beauty  elevation Hertziana, Rome Gugenheim Museum, Bilbao

27 What makes architecture good? Does it express its function in a meaningful, interesting, and appealing way? Does it seem to “fit” its surroundings (by complementing or contrasting with it in an interesting and meaningful way)? Is its design and execution structurally sound? Does it create a meaningful (interesting, surprising, enjoyable, delightful, disturbing etc.) space? Will it endure? Has it endured?

28 Analyzing a Building: Space: Solids and Voids Scale and Proportion Weight & Mass Basic Design Elements

29 Analyzing a Building: Space: Solids and Voids – Symmetry – Asymmetry

30 Symmetry

31 Asymmetry

32 Analyzing a Building: Weight & Mass: – Materials – Massing for Weight – Relationship to Ground (high or low?) – Texture – Color – Ornamentation – Light – Acoustics – Context

33 Basic Elements Roof Walls Windows Doorways Orientation

34 Roof Types

35 Butterfly Roof

36 Butterfly w/Solar Panels

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38 Barrel Vault Roof

39 Wall Types

40 Rusticated

41 Half-timbered

42 Clapboard

43 Board and Batten Siding

44 Wainscoting

45 Stucco Wall

46 Glass Wall

47 Window Types

48 Lancet

49 Palladian

50 Oeil-de-boeuf (ox-eye)

51 Double-hung window

52 Bay window

53 Ribbon Window

54 Casement window

55 Dormer

56 Doorways

57 Arched

58 Pedimented

59 Venetian Door

60 French Door

61 Sliding Door

62 Orientation

63 Aesthetic

64 Cultural

65 Ecological

66 The Getty Center Richard Meier

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