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WMD Crime Scene Management Managing a CBRNE Crime Scene.

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Presentation on theme: "WMD Crime Scene Management Managing a CBRNE Crime Scene."— Presentation transcript:

1 WMD Crime Scene Management Managing a CBRNE Crime Scene

2 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Objectives Describe the overall management of a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) crime scene Describe the roles and jurisdiction of the federal agencies that respond to collect evidence at a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) incident Describe the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Crime Scene Search Protocol at a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) crime scene

3 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Incident Command Structure (example) INCIDENT COMMAND OPERATIONS SECTION LOGISTICS SECTION PLANNING SECTION FINANCE/ ADMIN SECTION Supplies Services Personnel Equipment Contracts Accounting Time Control Tactical HazMat Police Fire EMS Strategic PIO SAFETY OFFICER LIASON OFFICER

4 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Multijurisdictional Incident (Unified Command) Unified Command Jurisdiction A Jurisdiction B Jurisdiction C Incident Commander Incident Commander Incident Commander Unified Objectives Command Staff Operations Section Operations Section Planning Section Planning Section Logistics Section Logistics Section Finance/ Administration Section Finance/ Administration Section

5 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Unified Command (continued) Unified Command may be used whenever multiple jurisdictions are involved in a response effort, such as:  Differing geographical boundaries  Differing governmental levels  Differing functional responsibilities

6 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Advantages of Using Unified Command A single set of objectives is developed for the entire incident A collective approach is used to develop strategies to achieve incident objectives Information flow and coordination is improved among all jurisdictions and agencies involved in the incident

7 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Advantages of Using Unified Command (continued) Agencies with responsibility for incident have an understanding of joint priorities and restrictions No agency’s legal authorities will be compromised or neglected The combined efforts of all agencies are optimized as they perform their respective assignments under a single Incident Action Plan (IAP)

8 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Transition to Unified Command INCIDENT COMMAND OPERATIONS SECTION LOGISTICS SECTION PLANNING SECTION FIN/ADMIN SECTION Incident Command Operations Section Logistics Section Planning Section Fin/Admin Section Unified Command Agency Rep. Liaison Officer Post Scribe PIO Safety Officer Operations Planning/ Intel Logistics Finance/ Admin

9 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Incident Action Plan (IAP) Overall incident objectives and strategies Written plan preferable to oral plan, because it clearly demonstrates responsibility IAP is designed around operational periods Operational period is no longer than 24 hours

10 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Phases of Comprehensive IAP 1.Understand the situation 2.Establish incident objectives and strategy 3.Develop the plan 4.Prepare and disseminate the plan 5.Evaluate and revise the plan

11 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Role of Federal Agencies at CBRNE Incident Department of Homeland Security (DHS)  Lead agency for coordination of all aspects of federal response during a CBRNE event Department of Justice (DOJ)  Preventing and investigation terrorist incidents DOJ Emblem DHS Emblem

12 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Search Protocols Preparation Approaching the scene Securing and protecting the scene Initiate preliminary surveys Evaluation of physical evidence probabilities Preparation of a narrative script FBI Evidence Response Team assessing a post blast site

13 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Search Protocols (continued) Photographing the scene Preparation of diagram/sketch Conducting a detailed search Recording and collecting physical evidence Conducting the final search Release of the scene

14 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Search Protocols (continued) Preparation  Training and having the proper supplies, tools, and knowledge Approaching the Scene  Early recognition of the nature of the threat Securing and Protecting the scene  Unnecessary personnel must be excluded from the scene

15 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Search Protocols (continued) Initiate preliminary surveys  Participate in a walk-through for an overview of the scene Evaluation of physical evidence possibilities  The team leader determines the tools and equipment needed for the collection process Preparation of a narrative description  Includes documentation of everything from arrival to the release of the scene

16 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Search Protocols (continued) Photographing the scene  Photograph or video everything from eye level to represent the scene from a normal viewpoint Preparation of a diagram/sketch  Accurately measure all of the evidence to be documented on the sketch Conducting a detailed search  Utilize the most effective search methods/patterns, collect control and blank samples, and conduct complete documentation

17 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Search Protocols (continued) Recording and collecting physical evidence  Preplan and have two investigators to observe evidence in its place, mark for identification, and keep evidence logs Conducting the final survey  Debrief the crime scene team to confirm the scene was covered and documentation and packaging is complete Release of the scene  Leave an inventory of all items seized with the owner of the location and debrief the IC

18 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Conclusion Describe the overall management of a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) crime scene Describe the roles and jurisdiction of the federal agencies that respond to collect evidence at a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) incident Describe the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Crime Scene Search Protocol at a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) crime scene

19 WMD Crime Scene Management Managing a CBRNE Crime Scene — End of Module


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