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WMD Crime Scene Management Defining a CBRNE Crime Scene.

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Presentation on theme: "WMD Crime Scene Management Defining a CBRNE Crime Scene."— Presentation transcript:

1 WMD Crime Scene Management Defining a CBRNE Crime Scene

2 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Objectives Identify the phases of response. Recognize a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) crime scene and the characteristics associated with its environment.

3 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Weapons of Mass Destruction

4 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Incident Phases Awareness Level Actions Recovery Phase  Last Living Victim Removed Restoration Phase  Contamination Survey Completed Response Phase  Scene Control Begins Notification Phase  Incident Recognized

5 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Notification Phase Begins with recognition that an incident has or is about to occur Ends with the initiation of incident management procedures Center L.A. County Fire Department

6 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Notification Phase Actions Ensure responders operate from a safe distance. Ensure all “awareness-level” actions have been properly implemented. Gather critical information on incident and communicate. Ensure safe incident management activities have been implemented. Law enforcement could be involved in the identification and arrest of criminal suspects.

7 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Response Phase Begins with incident management. Ends with removal of the last living victims from the hazard area. Challenges:  Site security  Victim rescue  Agent identification  Emergency decontamination of people  Evidence preservation  Multiple devices FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Team at World Trade Center

8 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Response Phase Actions Position equipment Isolate area  Hot zone  Warm zone  Cold zone Protect self (PPE) Segregate casualties/victims  Walking  Nonambulatory  Rescue HOT Warm Cold

9 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Response Phase Actions (continued) First aid  First aid to decontaminated victims  Triage, Treatment, Transport (T 3 ) Assist HazMat team with technical decontamination Defensive control Multiple devices and perpetrators Evidence preservation Technical Decontamination www. ftmeade.army.mil

10 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Recovery Phase Begins when the scene is stabilized, and the last living victim is transported to a medical facility. Ends with completion of the contamination survey. Challenges:  Link up with state and federal authorities  Evidence collection  Re-establishment of essential services  Decontamination of essential equipment

11 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Restoration Phase Begins with completion of the contamination survey. Ends with complete hazard remediation. Emphasis on elimination of contamination and site restoration.

12 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Recovery/Restoration Phase Actions Within PPE limitations:  Support/operate the decontamination requirements.  Support/operate the equipment decontamination site.  Provide medical support.  Post-incident medical assessment and follow-up.  Continue scene control.

13 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 CBRNE Incident Response versus Day- to-Day Response Situation may not be recognizable until multiple casualties. Possible multiple events. Responders at higher risk of becoming casualties. The location of the incident is treated as crime scene. Contamination of critical facilities and large geographic areas Scope of incident may expand.

14 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 CBRNE Incident Response versus Day- to-Day Response (continued) Stronger reaction from public. (“Do Something!”). Time becomes a factor. Critical infrastructure becomes a target. Specialized state and local response capabilities can become overwhelmed.

15 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Defining a Crime Scene Crime is an act committed in violation of law. Laws punishing criminal conduct highlight the elements needed for conviction. The elements are the various parts a prosecutor needs for conviction. Collecting Evidence at a Crime Scene Courtesy of CDP

16 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Common Elements of a Crime Actus reus—guilty act Mens rea—mental state; what is your intention? Concurrence—agreement in opinion; the act and intent meeting as one Causation—process of causing; the act of causing something to happen

17 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Defining a WMD Crime Scene Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear Explosive Oklahoma City Bombing

18 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Recognition First officer on scene has responsibility of protecting any potential evidence. Investigation depends on the ability to properly identify, isolate, and secure the scene.

19 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Evidence Preservation and Collection Actions and observations are very importan.t Everything is potential evidence. Communicate observations of evidence to other responders and to incident command. Record observations and actions as soon as possible. Victims can provide critical evidence.

20 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Initial Response to Scene The first-arriving responder should:  Note prearrival information (time, date, address, etc.)  Be aware of any persons or vehicles leaving crime scene  Note possible secondary crime scenes  Make initial observations (look, listen, smell)  Treat the crime as ongoing until told otherwise  Document all observations

21 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Crime Scene Considerations Golden Rule: Leave it alone unless it is absolutely necessary for the performance of duties with law enforcement approval. Second Rule: Do the job using the fewest number of personnel.

22 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Conclusion Identify the phases of response. Recognize a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive (CBRNE) crime scene and the characteristics associated with its environment.


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