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United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Meet Karak’s Family.

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Presentation on theme: "United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Meet Karak’s Family."— Presentation transcript:

1 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Meet Karak’s Family

2 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - There are five sub-species of Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo. The sub-species, South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii graptogyne) is only found in south-east South Australia and south-west Victoria. (See map next screen)

3 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 The range of the South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - Melbourne Adelaide South Australia Victoria

4 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo have a slow, loping wing-beat.

5 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo pair (female on the left).

6 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo pair, female has a white bill.

7 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - Only 800 – 1000 South-eastern Red-tailed Black- Cockatoos remain.

8 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo feed on the seed of buloke (Allocasuarina leuhmannii). Only 2% of buloke remain across the bird’s range, many as isolated paddock trees. The buloke fruits in late summer/autumn. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

9 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - Clumps of bulokes have been left in some ploughed paddocks and a few remain along the roadside.

10 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Remnant paddock trees continue to be removed to make way for pivot irrigation systems. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

11 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Thick buloke regeneration through suckering has occurred along roadsides since roadside stock grazing ceased in the 1960s. Buloke trees take on average 100 years to produce seed for South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

12 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Brown and Desert Stringybark seeds are eaten by the South- eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoos throughout the year. South-eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoo -

13 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos chew small branchlets, hold them in the left foot while extracting the seed from the capsule, and discard the leftovers, leaving a tell-tale carpet of chewings beneath the tree. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

14 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - They nest in live and dead hollow trees. These paddock red gums. The trees were ring-barked early last century. Where are the trees to replace them in the future?

15 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos also nest in living trees.

16 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos will incubate one egg. Once hatched, it takes almost 3 months for the young chick to fledge and leave the nest. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

17 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Cattle rub against remnant trees. This ring-barking will eventually kill them. South-eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoo -

18 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - A ring-barked buloke tree.

19 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Frequent fire in stringybark forests reduces the amount of seed available for the South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

20 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Legislation protecting dead, hollow trees preferred for nesting by South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos, has been introduced in South Australia and Victoria. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

21 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 Fencing off remaining South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo habitat is the best way to protect and ensure regeneration into the future. South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -

22 United through the Games - Integrated units © State of Victoria, 2005 South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo - Karak in stringybark at Casterton with volunteers.


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