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Divisibility 6.NS.2 Warm Ups. How many ways can you make…? 1.Using a set of squares, put 24 squares into one row. What equation can be used to represent.

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Presentation on theme: "Divisibility 6.NS.2 Warm Ups. How many ways can you make…? 1.Using a set of squares, put 24 squares into one row. What equation can be used to represent."— Presentation transcript:

1 Divisibility 6.NS.2 Warm Ups

2 How many ways can you make…? 1.Using a set of squares, put 24 squares into one row. What equation can be used to represent this one set of 24 squares? 2.With your partner, create as many rectangles (combinations of complete rows and columns) with the 24 squares. List those combinations as equations.

3 What does it mean? The length and width of the rectangles are factors of Could you have built a rectangle with the length of 5? Why or why not?

4 Make more rectangles Using the following numbers, create the list of equations that represent the rectangles you can make:

5 Table Task Mr. Hall’s first period class won the recycling challenge. The PTSA baked 804 cookies for the winning class. If each of the 28 students in Mr. Hall’s first period are to receive an equal share of cookies, how many cookies should each student receive? Give a written explanation to justify your solution.

6 Task #2 The PTSA sponsored a food drive challenge and wanted each student in the winning class to receive 42 pieces of candy. The PTSA has collected 924 pieces of candy so far. If the winning class were selected today, how many students would need to be in the class for each student to receive 42 pieces of candy? Give a written explanation to justify your solution.

7 Partial Quotient Technique topics/computation/div-part-quot/ Let’s look at the same problem again… this time, can we use a fraction to quantify the remainder? 165 ÷ 7 =

8 Partial Quotient, again… Here’s another example quotients#btnNext Again, let’s deal with that remainder… 177 ÷ 8 =

9 Break it Down… Partial quotients method (sometimes also called chunking): When dividing a large number (dividend) by a small number (divisor) Subtract from the dividend an easy multiple (for example 100×, 10×, 5× 2×, etc.) of the divisor. Repeat the subtraction until the large number has been reduced to zero or the remainder is less than the divisor. Add up the multiples of the divisor that were used in the repeated subtraction to find the answer of the division.

10 You try it…Using Partial Quotient! 1.13,335 ÷ 21 = ÷17 = 1.23, 982 ÷ 42 = ÷ 16 =


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