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© 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Broadcast Announcing Worktext.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Broadcast Announcing Worktext."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Broadcast Announcing Worktext

2 This week at RTV 1. Don’t forget to LOG YOUR LAB HOURS! Ways to earn lab hours: Monday: MPW/ Multimedia Fest Committee at 11am Tuesday: Radio Station Meeting (11am) & Sports Workshop (12pm) Thursday: RTV Club (12pm) Film Club (starts next week)(1pm) Friday: (10am) DCTV Network Meeting (sports, news, entertainment, ect)

3 Objectives for today: Power point for Chapter 1, Intro to announcing Power point for Chapter 2, Vocal Development Take a look at wix.com and weebly.comwix.comweebly.com How to create an account. Turn in your Ultimate media proposal assignment.

4 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Chapter Outline Announcer defined Historical and Employment Perspective Specialization Requirements College degree Physical requirements Emotional requirements Practical experience Responsibilities Role Models

5 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business What is an announcer? Announces station program information, public service announcements, intro and close programs, ad lib News, weather, sports, time, commercials Media performer Talent Personality

6 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Historical Perspective Product of electronic era Early radio: all male, stylized delivery, formal setting Today-conversational and male and female

7 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Employment Perspective Small number of positions By 2018, workforce projection is 65,000 Salaries tend to be low; driven by market size and experience Mean salary in $40,000 Range -$19/hour to $10-15 million annually

8 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Announcer Specialization Music Announcing News Announcing Anchors and Reporters Sports Announcing Sportscaster, play-by-play announcer, play analyst Specialty Announcing Voiceover, narrators, talk show host Work in more than one area

9 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business College Degree Not always necessary Options are trade school or a college BA Needed in news and management Provides a competitive advantage in a very competitive field Need-general education, media education and specialized education Writing and telling a story important

10 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Physical Requirements Pleasing sound Free from regional accents Standard American English Outstanding word pronunciation and accurate grammar usage. TV requires attractive appearance Stamina Physical strength to carry equipment

11 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Emotional Requirements Ability to handle stress Time constraints No room for error Perfectionist attitude

12 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Practical Experience Try to gain as much experience as possible Internships-more than one Work at a college station

13 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Announcer Responsibility Entertain, perform, persuade Communicate to an audience-who are they? What are their likes and dislikes? Life style information Social responsibility Participate in community activities Do not misuse position Properly operate equipment Emergency notification

14 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Role Models Learn what has worked for others Do not copy; be yourself

15 © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business Summary Announcer defined Historical and Employment Perspective Specialization Requirements College degree Physical requirements Emotional requirements Practical experience Responsibilities Role Models

16 Broadcast Announcing Worktext Chapter 4 Vocal Development

17 Chapter Outline How Sound is Produced Diaphragmatic Breathing and Proper Breathing Posture Element of Vocal Development: Volume, Pitch, Rate, Tone, Articulation Pronunciation and Sub-standard pronunciation Common Vocal Problems Caring for Your Voice

18 The Vocal Mechanism

19 How Sound is Produced Diaphragm contracts and draws air into the lungs Diaphragm relaxes, stomach contracts and air forced up through trachea to larynx Larynx or voice box contains vocal cords When silent, cords relaxed and passage open When speaking, cords become tight, air passes over, causing vibration and sound

20 Vocal Cords

21 How Sound is Produced II Vibrating air continues up to the head and mouth Bones of sinuses and head, and mouth act as resonators to the sound Teeth, tongue, jaw and palate articulate sounds to form words

22 Articulators

23 How Sound Is Produced-Summary Important to control the diaphragm muscle Three-step Process: Sound created by air passing through vocal cords Sound amplified and improved by the bones of the sinuses and head (resonance) Words are shaped by the articulators ; mouth, teeth, tongue, jaws and palate

24 Diaphragmatic Breathing Technique Inhale- deep breath forces diaphragm down and stomach area out Exhale- diaphragm relaxes and stomach pushes in To feel correct muscles lay on floor, place a book just below rib cage, breath until you can move the boo up and down Proper breathing helps tone and lengthens time you can speak without a breath

25 Proper Breathing Posture Standing -feet slightly apart, weight slightly on balls of feet, head up, knees slightly flexed, hips straight, back straight Sitting- edge of chair, feet flat, back straight As breath in, abdomen pushes out; chest and shoulders remain even and do not rise Allows for maximum expansion of diaphragm Natural way to breath, not thoracic breathing

26 Vocal Development-Volume Loudness or softness of your voice Contributes to perception of energy and enthusiasm Adds to interpretation of copy Do not rely on volume control on board Use projection-when speaking to someone at a distance we “push” the sound out (use the abdominal muscles)

27 Vocal Development-Pitch The highness or lowness of your voice Use full pitch range with emphasis on the naturally lower range Low range about 1/4 up from the lowest pitch with which you speak

28 Vocal Development-Tone Quality of sound; also called timbre Affected by what surrounds the vibrators; difference in musical instruments Material that surrounds vibrators, vibrates or resonates sound in different ways; known as tone quality To develop tone, learn to resonant sound in chest throat and head-helps to relax and use a high quality mic

29 Vocal Development-Articulation Sounds shaped into recognizable words Use of articulators-lips, teeth, tongue, jaw, hard and soft palates Produce sounds that are clear but not too precise Need a relaxed open jaw and mouth and moistened mouth Practice looking in a mirror and over articulating

30 Pronunciation The way in which words are spoken by uttering the proper sound and stressing the proper syllable Always look up words if unfamiliar and practice out loud Pronunciation guides included in wire copy or at station or on line

31 Pronunciation II “A” pronounced “uh” not “aye” “The” pronounce “thuh” not “thee” Foreign pronunciation Communities, lakes and streams derived from other languages Regional accents Use of phonetic spelling

32 Sub Standard Pronunciation Bad pronunciation caused by laziness and force of habit Omissions-leaving out part of the word-dropping last “g” “walkin” “talkin” Additions-adding to a word-”idea” becomes “idear” or the silent “l” in “salmon” is pronounced (“salmon” instead of samon”)

33 Sub Standard Pronunciation II Substitution-”budder” for “butter” Distortion-”jis” or “jist” for just To correct, become conscious of your pronunciation, record a newspaper article and analyze

34 Sub Standard Pronunciation III Practice 1.The police officer came running up behind the bank robber. 2.The druggist asked the boy where he got the prescription. 3.John’s first class was European History, one he would just like to forget.

35 Common Vocal Problems Fillers -used to fill a gap in conversation while you are thinking or a bad habit “uh”, “um”, “ya know”, “right”, “like” Difficult to change especially in ad lib situations Monotone -no variation in pitch or pace Sing-Song -pattern of inflection repeated throughout copy

36 Common Vocal Problems II Whiny- too high, nasal voice Improper breathing or resonance- nasality, thin voice, husky voice, breathy voice Sibilance -over emphasis on “s” sounds Popping -pop of air in words with p, b, t, d, g, k

37 Caring for Your Voice Warm up before session Keep hydrated Avoid Smoking Avoid Screaming and Shouting Rest voice after extensive use

38 Summary How Sound is Produced Diaphragmatic Breathing and Proper Breathing Posture Element of Vocal Development: Volume, Pitch, Rate, Tone, Articulation Pronunciation and Sub-standard pronunciation Common Vocal Problems Caring for Your Voice


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