Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Basic Ingredients Geography & How to Sell It Part I.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Basic Ingredients Geography & How to Sell It Part I."— Presentation transcript:

1 Basic Ingredients Geography & How to Sell It Part I

2 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 2

3 3 5 Strategies of Selling Geography You must: Know relevant facts Know what kind of traveller destination appeals to Know your client Ready to respond to misgivings Search for enhancement opportunities

4 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 4 Know All the Facts: Travel geography Climate Hurricane season Transportation Options How to get there and how to get around Itinerary Routings Geographic locations to avoid backtracking Hotel Locations Proximity to beach, attractions Key Attractions & Events Where and what is there to see and do at a destination

5 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 5 What kind of traveller should go? Each destination attracts its own type of traveller Match destination with traveller type Satisfied client = Greater sales Business Traveller Business Sales Conventions Conferences Usually destination is pre-chosen and is not optional Often will add leisure component to the business trip 25% domestic 40-50% international Leisure Traveller Pleasure Vacations Holidays VFR Usually destination, date & mode of transportation is chosen by traveller

6 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 6 Leisure Travellers History Buffs Culture Seekers Ethnic travellers Religious pilgrims Environmental travellers Recreational travellers Adventure seekers Entertainment seekers Shoppers Sensual travellers Status seekers Interpersonal travellers

7 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 7 Take a Look…. Take a look at your client Figure out what type he/she is Identify some destinations that would fit your client Identify the type of hotel that would fit your clients needs Identify the mode of travel that would best suit clients needs

8 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 8 Know the client you are serving: Qualifying the client Ask open-ended questions Probe Who What Where When Why Listen carefully to what they say And what they dont!

9 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 9 Qualifying the Client Questions Open-ended vs.Closed Leads to more infoyes/no Is your trip for business or pleasure? Have you been there before? What did you enjoy about the destination? What didnt you like about the trip ?

10 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 10 Qualifying the Client (cont.) Some clients know exactly what/where they want They have researched They have information They want efficiency, quality and insight Some clients have a vague idea of what/where they want They need your expertise in choosing their vacation They want you to provide the research and information They need to be focused

11 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 11 Qualifying the Client (cont.) Ask probing questions Listen to your clients answers Try to identify the clients primary motivation Review the clients needs Make a recommendation Describe the features and benefits of your recommendation Highlight benefits to your client Give them some insider info

12 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 12 Responding to Objections Objections need to be responded to Counters Allaying misgivings Providing information Objections RationalIrrational ValidInvalid Do not dismiss objections – deal with them!

13 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 13 Up-selling Improve quality of clients experience & increase your profits Better Hotel, class of service, car, mode of transportation… Identify the benefits of the up-sell You get what you pay for…. Why is there a price differential?….. Always offer the best product suited Much easier to bring down budget than push up

14 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 14 Cross- Selling Offering Extras Add-ons Ask if you can also book the client A car A hotel A tour at the destination Airport transfers Event tickets Travel insurance

15 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 15 Cross Selling (cont.) Offers your client more services Booked in advance & pre-paid Client may not know that you have the ability to book other travel components Shows the client that you are knowledgeable about the destination and services available Savings and convenience Allows you To sell more To generate more revenue and income To make commission on more travel services

16 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 16 Follow Up Find out how the trip went The good, the bad & the ugly With this info you will be better prepared for the next sale Deepens your destination knowledge Cements the client- seller relationship Opens the door for future bookings Shows the client that they are still valuable to you – even after they paid their money

17 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 17 Travel Sales & Service 1. Know the destinations 2. Create the perfect match between client and product 3. Follow-up

18 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 18 Maps Flat Maps Standard Mercator projection Distorted Extreme North & South appear larger Direct lines are NOT shortest on long distances Curved lines arched to polar routes

19 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 19

20 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 20 Maps (cont.) Route Maps Airline maps showing routes they fly CAA maps showing driving distances between cities Globes Most accurate maps Help to plot itineraries Awkward but useful

21 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 21 Maps (cont.) Locator Maps Reference Location of hotels Location of Attractions Indicates grids rather than degrees

22 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 22 Maps (cont.) Mental Maps How you picture geography in your mind Deceiving No sense of distance Misconceptions

23 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 23 Reading Maps Hemispheres Northern & Southern Equator is the division line Seasons are reversed Eastern & Western Western North & South America Eastern Africa, Europe, Asia

24 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 24 Reading Maps (cont.) Latitude Distance measured north & south of equator Degrees measured by latitude lines/parallels Farther from equator Greater variation between seasonal temperatures Greater variation between hours of night & day Polar latitude Land of the Midnight Sun Tropical Latitude Minimal variation of temperature & daylight Temperate Latitude Absence of extremes in temperature and daylight hours Location of most industrialized nations

25 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 25 Reading Maps (cont.) Longitude Distance east & west of prime meridian Longitude lines( meridians) are measured in degrees Sir Sanford Fleming proposed time zones 1884 world agreed to create 24 standard time zones – earth takes 24 hours to turn 360 ° 360° ÷ 24 hours = 15 ° degrees time zone Tend to follow time zones Greenwich became reference point Greenwich Mean Time - GMT

26 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 26

27 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 27 Time Zones Time zones EAST of GMT are expressed as positive Time zones WEST of GMT are expressed as negative China Even though 4 zones wide – it only recognizes 1 time zone India Averages the 2 time zones for the whole country Canada 6 primary time zones http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/reference/national/timezones Daylight Savings Hour change in spring & fall Saskatchewan, Arizona, Hawaii, & parts of Indiana do not observe.

28 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 28 Time Zones (cont.) Trips that cross many time zones Jet lag Travelling east more disruptive than travelling west Fatigue, loss of sleep, disorientation Elapsed time vs. apparent time Airlines give arrival and departure times in local time Ensure that YOU know day your client arrives in international city to avoid error in hotel reservations

29 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 29 International Date Line Vertical zigzag line Bisects Pacific Ocean Direct line from GMT Cross line travelling west Day change to next Hour stays same Cross line travelling east Day change to previous Hour stays same

30 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 30 Elapsed Flying Time Military Time 24 hour clock 2400 is midnight -1200 is noon How long does a flight take? Within 1 time zone Subtract departure time from arrival time 0915 – 0700 = 2 hours 15 minutes Crossing time zones Subtract departure time from arrival time then ADD 1 hour per time zone on a Westbound Flight SUBTRACT 1 hour per time zone on an Eastbound Flight

31 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 31 Landforms

32 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 32 Landforms (cont.) Continents Major landmasses 7 North American, South America, Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, Antarctica Islands Caribbean, Mediterranean, Pacific Cays Keys, sandy coral islands Cayman Islands, Florida Keys Atolls Small coral islands usually ringlike, enclose lagoon

33 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 33 Landforms (cont.) Peninsulas & Capes Projections of land into water Peninsulas are longer than capes Gaspé, Baja, Iberia, Florida Cape Cod, Cape Canaveral Panhandle Narrow portion that sticks into another Alaska Panhandle, Florida Panhandle Reefs Ridges of land rising to water Great diving Great Barrier Reef, Philippines, Hawaii

34 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 34 Mountains Dramatic beauty Scenery Snow covered slopes Ski & Snow sports Travel Slow & indirect Volcanic Show & danger Affect climate Windward rainy Leewarddrier

35 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 35 Mountains (cont.) North America South America Europe Asia Africa Russia France/Spain Mexico US East Coast Quebec Rockies Andes Alps Himalaya Atlas Urals Pyrenees Sierra Madre Appalachians Laurentians

36 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 36 Plateau A broad flat area rising above surrounding land Elevation Cooler Mesas Smaller steeper version of plateaux Buttes Smaller, tower-like versions American Southwest

37 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 37 Bodies of Water Gulfs Large areas of ocean that penetrate into land Gulf of Mexico Bays Smaller and less enclosed than gulfs Hudsons Bay Fjords Inlets from ocean or sea Usually long, narrow & lined with steep cliffs Norway BC, Newfoundland

38 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 38 Bodies of Water (cont.) Rivers Large natural channel of water running to sea or another body of water Cruise opportunities North AmericaMississippi St Lawrence EuropeRhine, Danube AfricaNile South AmericaAmazon

39 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 39 Bodies of Water (cont.) Glacier River of ice and compacted snow that flows VERY slowly from high cold places Canada, Alaska, Switzerland, New Zealand Ice Field Mass of ice sits over broad area Ice Sheets Biggest ice fields

40 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 40 Bodies of Water (cont.) Waterfalls Cascades of water Niagara Falls, Iguaçu Falls, Victoria Falls, Angel Falls Seas Large bodies of water Usually salt, - sometimes fresh More than 50 seas in the world Mediterranean, Caribbean, Red, Baltic, Black Lakes Small than seas Usually fresh Mostly or fully enclosed Great Lakes, Caspian Sea, Dead Sea

41 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 41 Bodies of Water (cont.) Lagoons Shallow bodies of water Separated by reefs or barrier reefs Snorkelling opportunities Caribbean & Pacific Islands Bayou Marshy, swampy areas Louisiana Deltas Low, V-shaped areas at the mouth of rivers Mississippi, Nile

42 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 42 Bodies of Water (cont.) Geysers A spring the throws a Jet of steaming water into air at regular or irregular intervals Iceland, New Zealand, Old Faithful Springs Water flowing naturally to the earths surface Hot or cold Often spa resort areas Baden Baden, Banff, Radium, Miette

43 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 43 Oceans Greatest bodies of water Attract many tourists Atlantic Pacific Indian Arctic Ocean water temperature Season Latitude Ocean currents

44 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 44

45 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 45 Coriolis Effect Oceans circulate in the Northern Hemisphere CLOCKWISE Oceans circulate in the Southern Hemisphere COUNTER-CLOCKWISE Currents pick up WARM water at the equator COLD water from the polar regions Variation Gulf Stream Shape permits warm water to be carried up to Great Britain Seacoast has fewer extremes of temperature Cool ocean water coasts drier Warm water coasts wetter

46 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 46 Winds Westerlies Blow west to east Between 30° & 60° East to west flight take longer Jet Stream High velocity core Western coastal regions tend to be wetter than east

47 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 47 Winds (cont.) Trade Winds Humid breezes blowing east to west Tropical band Central, South American, Australia & most islands Between 25° N and 25° S Tropical islands with mountains Western coast usually leeward Eastern coast usually windward Suggest clients stay on leeward side

48 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 48 Storms Hurricanes Violent storms High winds > 120km/hr Heavy rains Caribbean or Mexico Hurricanes Western Pacific Typhoons Australia & Indian Ocean Cyclones

49 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 49 Hurricanes Northern Hemisphere June – November 80% in August, September, October Madagascar & Mozambique Cyclones Hurricanes rarely maintain strength as they move inland In 2005, there were 27 storms in the season

50 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 50

51 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 51 Monsoons Winds reverse direction & cause heavy rainy season India June – September China May – September Korea July – August N. Australia, Indonesia, Singapore December – March Southern West Africa May - October

52 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 52 Cloudbursts Sudden heavy showers Major factor in tropics Clients should be advised as to pattern in the destinations they will be travelling to Tsunami Massive wave usually triggered by an earthquake 2004 Tsunami http://newton.uor.edu/departments&programs/AsianStudiesdept/tsunami.html

53 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 53 Weather Atmosphere at given time, given place Climate Weather that is typical at a certain time of year Climate is a critical traveller concern

54 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 54 Weather Tips Higher altitude = Cooler Temperature Windy = seems cooler Check climate at destination AND stopovers Careful with charts & graphs Canadian or American Metric or imperial measurements Fahrenheit or Celsius

55 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 55 Human Geography Tourist patterns High or Peak Season Shoulder Season Low or Off-Season Cost, availability, crowds Holidays Many do not take vacations over family holidays VFR traffic is up – (Visiting Friends & Relatives) Some holidays set off peaks of tourism

56 Copyright © 2007 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 56 Human Geography (cont.) Events Events can be positive or negative and will affect travel patterns Usually disproportionate impact Need to verify the safety of destination to client Reaction will fade away as time passes Positive events Olympics, World Fairs, Sports Events, Movie or Television venues Negative events War, political turmoil, terrorism, natural disasters


Download ppt "Basic Ingredients Geography & How to Sell It Part I."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google