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Towards a Transformational Government Framework tGov 2011 17 th /18 th March 2011 Brunel University.

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Presentation on theme: "Towards a Transformational Government Framework tGov 2011 17 th /18 th March 2011 Brunel University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Towards a Transformational Government Framework tGov th /18 th March 2011 Brunel University

2 Introduction A few words about me:  I am the chair of the Transformational Government Framework Technical Committee. I am also the chair of the OASIS eGov Member Section and chair of the OASIS Technical Committee on e-voting standards. I am also a past Director of OASIS.  I spent the majority of my career working on the development of ICT systems, policies, strategies and procedures for central and local government in the United Kingdom.  I worked in the Office of e-Envoy (and subsequently the Cabinet Office’s e- Government Unit) where I was the Director of Technology, responsible for the UK’s e-Government Interoperability Framework (e-GIF) and other e- government and e-voting technical policies and standards.  I took early retirement from the UK Civil Service in 2006 after 38 years service and have since been a self-employed consultant.

3 OASIS Overview  OASIS is a member consortium dedicated to building e-business systems’ interoperability specifications  Main focus is on applications of structured information standards (eg XML, SGML) but increasing focus on adoption of standards  Members of OASIS are providers, users and specialists of standards-based technologies  Include organisations, individuals, industry groups and governments  More than 600 member organisations, 1000s individuals  Global, Not-for-profit, Open, Independent  Successful through industry and government wide collaboration  MOUs and Liaison Agreements with all major standardisation bodies, eg ISO, UN/CEFACT, CEN, W3C, etc.

4 Working Arrangements 1.Technical Committees are set-up by OASIS members to deliver a specific piece of work and then, usually, close down.  The Transformational Government TC seeks to produce an overall framework for using information technology to improve the delivery of public services through better citizen engagement to assure greater use and return on investment. 2.Member Sections are created when a collection of OASIS Members recognize a particular need or common goal and are willing to commit to work on that need over an extended period.  The eGovernment Member Section serves as a focal point for discussions of government and public administration requirements for e- business standardization.

5 What is Transformational Government? The definition of Transformational Government used within our Framework is as follows: ”A managed process of ICT-enabled change in the public sector, which puts the needs of citizens and businesses at the heart of that process and which achieves significant and transformational impacts on the efficiency and effectiveness of government.”

6 e-Government – the lack of success No critical mass of users Wasted resources Duplicated IT expenditure Little impact on core public policy objectives ?

7 ? Citizen- centric business model Citizen- centric business model Lower cost Happier customers Higher policy impact Empowered citizens Business Customers Channels Technology Business Customers Channels Technology Business Customers Channels Technology Business Customers Channels Technology Transformational Government

8 Costs / benefits of public sector IT Computerisation: databases and back office automation Computerisation: databases and back office automation eGov 1.0: Online Service Delivery eGov 1.0: Online Service Delivery eGov 2.0: Transformational Government eGov 2.0: Transformational Government Benefit realisation Fragmented Interoperable Integrated Citizen-focused Citizen-enabled Transformation Automation PCMainframeInternetCloud Enablers of change “Governments are shifting from a government-centric paradigm to a citizen- centric paradigm” Rethinking e-government services: user-centric approaches, OECD, 2009

9 Some features of this shift E-Government Transformational Government  Government-centric  Citizen-centric  Supply push  Demand pull  Government as sole provider of citizen services  Government also as convener of multiple competitive sources of citizen services  Unconnected vertical business silos  New virtual business layer, built around citizen needs, operates horizontally across government  “Identity” is owned and managed by government  “Identity” is owned and managed by the citizen  Public data locked away within government  Public data available freely for reuse by all  Citizen as recipient or consumer of services  Citizen as owner and co-creator of services  Online services  IT as capital investment  Multi-channel service integration  IT as a service  Producer-led  Brand-led Bolting technology onto the existing business model of government Focusing first on the business changes needed to unlock benefits for citizens, and only then on the technology

10 Government Gateway Multiple access channels Portal infrastructure Common web services Inter-operable departmental systems ukonline.gov.uk Local govt. portals Private sector portals E-Government Interoperability Framework Registration and enrolment Authentication Secure Rules engine Circumstances and personalisation Payments Notifications Appointments What we tried first in the UK Life events

11 DTV Mobile Call CentrePC Government Gateway Multiple access channels Portal infrastructure Common web services Inter-operable departmental systems ukonline.gov.uk Local govt. portals Private sector portals E-Government Interoperability Framework Registration and enrolment Authentication Secure Rules engine Circumstances and personalisation Payments Notifications Appointments 3 60 Impact Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3 Q4 Q Buying online Banking online Government online

12 Impact of addressing the business model Average monthly visits

13 Costs / benefits of public sector IT Computerisation: databases and back office automation Computerisation: databases and back office automation eGov 1.0: Online Service Delivery eGov 1.0: Online Service Delivery eGov 2.0: Transformational Government eGov 2.0: Transformational Government Benefit realisation The problem Most governments are still here Getting this right is hard, and there is little guidance

14 In theory, current e-government frameworks address governance and business change European Interoperability Framework v 2.0

15 The key elements of the proposed Transformational Government Framework

16 The Charter of the OASIS Transformational Government Framework Technical Committee n The major deliverable will be a Framework for Transformational Government. n Included in this Framework will be: l a Transformational Government Reference Model, l definitions of a series of policy products necessary to implement the change, l a value chain for citizen service transformation, l a series of guiding principles, l a business model for change, l a delivery roadmap, l and a checklist of critical success factors. n Supporting this Framework will be a number of Use Cases and other guidance advice on its adoption

17 Target Audiences 1.Primarily intended to meet the needs of: n Ministers and senior officials responsible for shaping public sector reform and e-Government strategies and policies (at national, state/regional and city/local levels); n Senior executives in industry who wish to partner with and assist governments in the transformation of public services. 2.Secondary audiences : n Leaders of international organisations working to improve public sector delivery, whether at a global level (eg World Bank, United Nations) or a regional one (eg European Commission, n Academic and other researchers working in the field of public sector reform; n Civil society institutions engaged in debate on how technology can better enable service transformation.

18 The TGF Primer - draft

19 Set of Guiding Principles 1.Be obsessive about understanding your customers Own the customer at the whole-of-government level Don’t assume you know what your customers think – research, research, research Invest in developing a real-time, event-level understanding of citizen interactions with government 2.Build services around customer needs, not organisational structure Provide people with one place to access government, built round their needs Don’t try to restructure government to do this – build “customer franchises” which sit within the existing structure of government and act as change agents Deliver services across multiple channels – but using web services to join it all up, reduce infrastructure duplication, and to encourage customers into lower cost channels Don’t spend money on technology before addressing organisational and business change Don’t reinvent wheels - build a cross-government strategy for common citizen data sets (eg name, address) and common citizen applications (eg authentication, payments, notifications) 3.Citizen service transformation is done with citizens, not to them Engage citizens directly in service design and delivery Give citizens the technology tools that enable them to create public value themselves Give citizens ownership and control of their personal data – and make all non-personal data available for re-use and innovation by citizens and third parties 4.Grow the market Ensure that your service transformation plans are integrated with an effective digital inclusion strategy to build access to and demand for e-services across society Recognise that other market players often have much greater influence on citizen behaviour than government – so build partnerships which enable the market to deliver your objectives 5.Manage and measure the nine critical success factors

20 Critical Success Factors 1.Strategic clarity - clear vision, strong business case, focus on results 2.Leadership - sustained support, leadership skills, collaborative governance 3.User focus - holistic view of the customer, citizen-centric delivery, citizen empowerment 4.Skills - skills mapping, skills integration 5.Stakeholder engagement - stakeholder communication, cross-sectoral partnership 6.Supplier partnership - smart supplier selection, supplier integration 7.Do-ability - phased improvement, continuous improvement 8.Future-proofing - interoperability, web centric delivery, agility, shared services, continuous improvement 9.Benefit realisation - b enefit mapping, benefit tracking, benefit delivery

21 Policy Products

22 The Delivery Processes n TGF identifies four main delivery processes, each of which needs to be managed in a government-wide and citizen-centric way in order to deliver effective transformation: l business management l customer management l channel management l technology management

23 Business Management – The Franchise Model n A number of agile cross-government virtual "franchise businesses" based around customer segments such as, for example, parents, motorists, disabled people. n Responsible for gaining full understanding of their customers' needs so that they can deliver quickly and adapt to changing requirements over time in order to deliver more customer centric services - which in turn, is proven to drive higher service take-up and greater customer satisfaction. n Provide a risk-averse operational structure that enables functionally-organised government agencies at national, regional and local to work together in a customer-focused "Delivery Community", by: l Enabling government to create a "virtual" delivery structure focused on customer needs l Operating inside the existing structure government (because they are owned and resourced by one of the existing "silos" which has a close link to the relevant customer segment) l Removing a single point of failure l Working across government (and beyond) to manage the key risks to citizen-centric service delivery l Acting as change agents inside government departments / agencies. n Enables a "mixed economy" of service provision: l first, by providing a clear market framework within which private and voluntary sector service providers can repackage public sector content and services; l and second by disseminating Web 2.0 approaches across government to make this simpler and cheaper at a technical level. n The whole model is capable of being delivered using Cloud Computing

24 Way Forward  OASIS TGF Technical Committee monthly meetings  17 th Mar – approve Primer  thereafter expand and turn it into OASIS standard  References:  TC Website  Wikipedia  LinkedIn Group  Contact:


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