Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Fall 20071 The Crisis in Funding for Public Education: Your Child’s Future Is at Stake A presentation by Washington State PTA 2007 www.wastatepta.org.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Fall 20071 The Crisis in Funding for Public Education: Your Child’s Future Is at Stake A presentation by Washington State PTA 2007 www.wastatepta.org."— Presentation transcript:

1 Fall The Crisis in Funding for Public Education: Your Child’s Future Is at Stake A presentation by Washington State PTA 2007

2 Fall Published: Tuesday, June 26, in 4 first-year students earn F's More than 1 in 4 Snohomish County high school freshmen failed … By Eric Stevick, Herald Writer Last updated June 8, 2007 Math scores still lag in WASL Preliminary test results released By JESSICA BLANCHARD P-I REPORTER Board Update April 2007 Friday, September 1, schools in state fail U.S. goals In Seattle, students at 28 sites 'need improvement' Inadequate numbers of students are being prepared to fill the state’s critical workforce needs, especially students with bachelor’s and advanced degrees in high- demand fields. “A total of 15,921 high school students dropped out of school during the 2004–05 school year.” Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Job Forecast Over the next five to seven years, Washington State employers will need more workers with some form of postsecondary vocational training than any other educational level. Post Secondary Career and Technical Education Works 2006 By JESSICA BLANCHARD P-I REPORTER

3 Fall District officials will prioritize $3 million in suggested cutbacks to save $900,000 next year By Eric Stevick / Herald Writer Published: Saturday, May 5, 2007 Marysville schools consider cuts School cuts outlined Sports, libraries, cleaning could all be slashed Local News: Friday, March 23, 2007 Seattle schools to find way to balance budget Local News: Saturday, February 10, 2007 Issaquah district seeks ideas on budget woes Local News: Sunday, April 22, 2007 Renton schools face budget crunch Published: Monday, December 4, 2006 Bus funds fall short Schools pay when state doesn't, study says By Melissa Slager / Herald Writer Tuesday, October 31, 2006 Districts challenge special-ed financing Coalition suing Washington state over school funding January 11, 2007 Sunday, July 29, 2007 Southeast Opinion It's time to solve state's education-funding crisis Sara Leaming Staff writer March 8, 2007 By Karen Johnson Times Southeast Bureau By Rachel Tuinstra Seattle Times Eastside bureau By Alex Fryer Seattle Times staff reporter By Skip Priest Special to The Times By DAVID AMMONS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS OLYMPIA

4 Fall Presentation Overview 1.As Funding for K-12 Education has Declined, Costs have Increased. 2.Insufficient K-12 Funds Affect All Students 3. Some School Districts are Worse Off 4. We Have a Legal Right to Basic Education 5. Many Problems in State Funding 6. What Can You Do About the Crisis?

5 Fall Source: Based on OSPI data for General Fund revenues for school year Funding Declines while Costs Increase K-12 Funding Include Local, State and Federal Funds

6 Fall Source: Education Week, Quality Counts 2006, based on per-pupil expenditures adjusted for regional differences in education costs (2003). U.S. Average per pupil- $8,041 WA State per pupil - $ 7, Funding Declines while Costs Increase Washington State’s per-pupil funding ranks 42nd in the nation

7 Fall Source: U.S. Dept. of Education, Digest of Education Statistics 2005, Table 167. Washington State’s per-pupil funding has lagged behind the US national average since Funding Declines while Costs Increase

8 Fall The State’s student funding has not kept up with inflation since ’92. Source: OSPI’s Five Year Strategic Plan Funding Declines while Costs Increase

9 Fall Two different expert studies on the cost of a quality education both say the state’s per-pupil funding is less than what’s needed. Expert Source: See the notes for this slide. 1. Funding Declines while Costs Increase

10 Fall More Students with Greater Needs Source: OSPI Report Card 1. Funding Declines while Costs Increase

11 Fall These laws ADDED big costs, BUT have not been accompanied by any significant increase in State or Federal funding. Certain federal and state laws require that all children must meet State Academic Standards Federal No Child Left Behind Act WASL State Law + 1. Funding Declines while Costs Increase

12 Fall Insufficient Funding Affects All Students Right now, our children’s opportunities to learn in public schools are limited. In the future, our children’s career and college opportunities may be limited.

13 Fall Declining Revenues and Increasing Costs Districts can’t initiate new programs or expand existing ones. Districts cut budgets. Districts cut administrative programs. Districts cut support services, maintenance. Districts cut instructional programs. Balanced budget, but inadequate services. 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

14 Fall Insufficient Funding Affects All Students Washington Learns researchers concluded that it was possible for all students to achieve the state’s academic standards, but not at the state’s current level of resources. To improve performance, many school districts will have to adopt more effective, research-proven instructional strategies which will require the state to substantially increase its funding of schools. Given this finding, districts that have already cut staff or resources are facing a steep, uphill climb. Here are some examples of how our children’s education is shortchanged in this state.

15 Fall Classified Staff Custodians Maintenance WorkersSecurity Guards Bus Drivers Office Staff 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

16 Fall Enrichment Programs SportsArts BandMusic Programs 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

17 Fall Certificated Support Staff Nurses Instructional Coaches Librarians Counselors 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

18 Fall Instructional Supplies & Equipment Lab Equipment Classroom Technology Paper Textbooks and Student Materials Computers 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

19 Fall Specialized or Advanced Courses Career and Technical Education World Languages Advanced Placement 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

20 Fall Certificated Teaching Staff ELL Teachers Tutors Core Classroom Teachers Math & Science TeachersSpecial Ed Teachers 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

21 Fall Lack of Resources Linked to Low Math WASL Scores Source: OSPI data from State Report Card 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

22 Fall Schools struggle to prepare students for the workforce and postsecondary education. Business & Marketing Health & Human Services Technology & Industry Agriculture Universities Community Colleges Technical Institutes 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

23 Fall Workforce Readiness Suffers Although about 34% of Washington’s 60,000 high school graduates go straight to work after graduation, Only about 20% of all graduates have completed a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program in high school. Which is too bad, because : Businesses like CTE students and are more likely to hire them. Workers with CTE credits earn more than workers without. Workers with CTE credits are more likely to continue their education. Source: Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, 2004 Report 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

24 Fall Most Students Not Ready for College 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

25 Fall Many high schools have low rankings in UW admit decisions 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

26 Fall College Remediation Rates are High and Costly 42% of the students who graduated from public high schools in 2004 and attended a Washington state technical college, community college, or university enrolled in at least one remedial course. Families pay double; Students need more time to earn degree. Leading predictor of college dropouts is need for remedial reading. 2. Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

27 Fall Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

28 Fall Our Children’s Opportunities and Financial Security Are at Stake Source: U.S. Census Cited by Edfund. Learn and Earn Chart Insufficient Funding Affects All Students

29 Fall Some Districts Are Worse Off Than Others WA has 295 Individual School Districts

30 Fall Seventeen districts have very low per-pupil funding 3. Some Districts Are Worse Off

31 Fall Rank of the 65 Districts* that were below the avg. $6,906 per-pupil funding 3. Some Districts Are Worse Off

32 Fall We Have a Legal Right To A Fully Funded Basic Education

33 Fall Why Focus on Basic Education? State’s Basic Ed Is the Biggest Piece of Pie! Basic Education Programs (State is Legally Required to Fund) General Apportionment Special Education Vocational Education Learning Assistance Program Some Pupil Transportation Juvenile Detention Center & State Institution Ed programs 4. Our Legal Right to Fully Funded Basic Ed

34 Fall State Courts Judicial decisions in 1978 and 1983 have held that: The State must define and fully fund basic education. Excess levies can not be required to fund any part of basic education. The Legislature is required to continually review, evaluate, and revise basic education funding formulas as the education system evolves and changes. The State Constitution “It is the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all children residing within its borders…” 4. Our Legal Right to Fully Funded Basic Ed

35 Fall The State Legislature The Basic Education Act of 1978 originally defined basic education and developed the staff-per-student ratios used in funding formulas. The Education Reform Act of 1993 significantly changed the definition of basic education and for the first time established high academic standards for all students. 4. Our Legal Right to Fully Funded Basic Ed

36 Fall But the Legislature has not revised the funding formulas for basic education since 1978! Think how much educational needs have changed regarding: Computers, classroom technology and internet access Counselors, nurses and social workers Specialists in reading and math ELL teachers, audiologists and other professional therapists Highly trained teachers for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate programs 4. Our Legal Right to Fully Funded Basic Ed

37 Fall Many Problems in State School Funding 1.Inequities in State Salary Schedule 2.Not Enough Funding for Student Needs 3.Not Enough Funding For Facility Needs 4.Not Enough Funding for Staff

38 Fall Inequities in State Salary Schedule Gave Rise to Geographical Variation Source: LEAP Document 12E Salary Allocations for the School Year 5. Many Problems in State School Funding

39 Fall Research: Programs for students in poverty cost at least twice as much (100% more) as regular education. Washington State: Programs for students in poverty provide only an additional 7% to 17%. Not Enough Funding for Student Needs 5. Many Problems in State School Funding

40 Fall students who require extra attention…. without extra staff, the burden falls on classroom teacher. Lack of funding for student needs affects all students. 5. Many Problems in State School Funding

41 Fall Source: OSPI Data for School Year Many Problems in State School Funding

42 Fall Source: OSPI Data for School Year Many Problems in State School Funding

43 Fall Source: OSPI Data for School Year Not Enough Funding for Student Needs 5. Many Problems in State School Funding

44 Fall Not Enough Funding for Facility Needs Utility costs are for electricity, heating, and water/sewage. Source: OSPI, State Summary, General Fund Expenditures by Activity and State Apportionment Summaries 5. Many Problems in State School Funding

45 Fall Not Enough Funding for Enough Staff 5. Many Problems in State School Funding

46 Fall Not Enough Funding for All Staff 22% paid by Locals 78% paid by State 60,907 State-wide Instructional Staff State Legislature Mandates Pay or Benefit Increase for State’s Instructional Staff Local Funds State Funds 5. Many Problems in State School Funding

47 Fall What Can You Do About the Crisis? 1.Vote Nov. 6th ’07 for a Simple Majority to Pass School Levies. 2. Advocate for the Redefinition and Full Funding of the State’s Basic Education Program. Support On-Going Initiatives +

48 Fall Vote for a Simple Majority for School Levies to: Preserve a critical part (16% avg) of WA K-12 Funding Keep local dollars for local schools Make your Yes vote count as much as a No vote 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

49 Fall Advocate for the Redefinition and Full Funding of State’s Basic Education Governor to appoint a Task Force charged with revising Basic Ed & developing new funding formulas for education system. In Sept. 2008, Task Force will recommend a phase-in plan for new K-12 funding and formulas. 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

50 Fall State Progress in Funding K-12 Ed Even though the state increased K-12 budget by $1.7 billion, $841 million is needed to maintain current level of services and $902 million is for new investments, of which most (58%) is to improve the pay and benefits of existing teachers, classified staff and administrators. The state still needs to add more staff and more resources! K-12 Budget $13.5 billion K-12 Spending $11.8 billion Increase in K-12 Funds = $1.7 billion 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

51 Fall Who Advocates? People are advocates!  Individuals  Local Units  Councils  Coalitions 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

52 Fall Where To Advocate? Within your own normal circles – your friends and peers your school and PTA groups your school board your district administration your unions your local governments and agencies WITH YOUR LEGISLATORS –House Representatives –Senator 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

53 Fall Steps To Take Now Become informed –Enroll in PTA’s Action Alerts: You’ll receive PTA s in the legislative session, each with background info and a requested action on a specific issue. –Read PTA’s Weekly “Grassroots Connection” weekly during legislative session, and the Bill Status Summary, Go to - Click on “Legislation” Educate others –Present this Ed Funding PowerPoint to your PTA group –Invite an Ed Funding PTA speaker to your next PTA meeting 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

54 Fall Steps To Take Now Lend your support –Write or your legislative representatives : Go to - Click on “Find Your Legislator” –Write letters to the editors of local newspapers, –Vote! Especially for a Simple Majority on Nov. 6, 2007! Support WSPTA –Appoint a Local Legislative Chair for your PTA unit, –Send the Local Legislative Chair or any interested member to PTA’s Legislative Assembly in October. 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

55 Fall Thank You For learning more about the funding of K-12 public education For understanding how the underfunding of Basic Ed has pervasive effects on our children’s opportunities For becoming more attentive to all education funding issues For speaking up and speaking out – share your new knowledge with everyone For taking action – to be aware, to ask questions, to be active, and to give more -- to participate in the solutions! Thank you for letting us share this presentation! 6. What Can You Do About The Crisis?

56 Fall Sources & References To Comment or Ask Questions Contact: Your PTA Council or Local Legislative Chair A WSPTA Region Director, found at WA State PTA Legislative Director Washington State PTA at Additional Information Is Available From WSPTA Web Site: Ver.1.0 w/o Narration - Billinghurst & Shutz - 09/06/2007

57 Fall Citations of information presented in this slide show are available from the presenters. Citations are in the PowerPoint notes & the “How-To” doc. Sources & References


Download ppt "Fall 20071 The Crisis in Funding for Public Education: Your Child’s Future Is at Stake A presentation by Washington State PTA 2007 www.wastatepta.org."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google