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Co-Teaching Preparation: Keys to Success Part I: Curriculum and Instruction.

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Presentation on theme: "Co-Teaching Preparation: Keys to Success Part I: Curriculum and Instruction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Co-Teaching Preparation: Keys to Success Part I: Curriculum and Instruction

2 Outcomes Participants will be able to identify two major categories of team-teaching Participants will be able to define six models of team-teaching Participants will plan for successful delivery of curriculum

3 Legislative Requirements Effective July 1, 2005, school districts may implement co-teaching strategies for the following reasons: Pairing teachers for staff development Pairing new teachers with veteran teachers Pairing teachers who are teaching out-of-field with teachers who are in-field Reducing turnover among new teachers Providing for more flexibility and innovation in the classroom Improving learning opportunities for students, including students who have disabilities

4 Legislative Requirements Additional requirements are: Reasonable limits shall be placed on the number of students in a classroom so that classrooms are not overcrowded. Teacher-to-student ratios within a curriculum area or grade level must not exceed constitutional limits. At least one member of the team must have at least 3 years of teaching experience. At least one member of the team must be teaching in field. The teachers must be trained in team-teaching methods within one year after assignment.

5 “ Co-Teachers jointly plan and conduct instruction in a coordinated fashion to ensure the success of all students.” - - Friend and Cook 2003

6 “ Co-teachers help one another by providing different areas of expertise that, when fused together correctly, can result in enhanced instruction for all students.” - - Murawski and Dieker 2004

7 Team-teaching Models Category 1: Two or more teachers with equal responsibility, working with the same group of students at the same time Category 2: Two or more teachers working together, but not necessarily teaching the same students, nor necessarily teaching at the same time

8 Category 1 Models Traditional Collaborative Complimentary/Supportive Parallel Differentiated Split Class Monitoring Teacher

9 Traditional Teachers share instruction of content and skills to all students, at same time Example: One teacher provides direct instruction to class, while other teacher models construction of a graphic organizer of the subject matter

10 Collaborative Teaching is done completely through group strategies Examples: Group project work Student-led discussions Joint test taking

11 Complimentary/Supportive One teacher is responsible for teaching the content, the other for providing follow-up activities Example: One teacher presents the content information on volume, the other teacher prepares an experiment on volume

12 Parallel The class is divided into two equal groups; each teacher presents the same lesson Examples: Groups go to opposite sides of the room, receive same information Small groups are formed for project work, each teacher works with half the groups

13 Differentiated Split Class Students are grouped by academic strengths, teachers share responsibility for meeting needs of each group Example: Students are grouped for reading, each teacher is responsible for an equal number of groups or students

14 Monitoring Teacher One teacher instructs, while the other teacher circulates throughout room Example: One teacher presents a new math skill, while the other teacher circulates and monitors students’ implementation of the skill

15 Remember… Co-teachers are equal Model sharing of time and responsibilities Use a variety of methods/strategies Trade roles on a regular basis

16 “The plan is nothing, planning is everything.” - - Dwight D. Eisenhower

17 ACTIVITY Work with your co-teacher to complete the Guided Questions Activity Sheet on Curriculum and Instruction. Choose one response to share with the group.

18 + ∆ Helpful Enjoyable Appreciated Opportunities for improvement

19 Co-Teaching Preparation: Keys to Success Part II: Classroom Management

20 Outcomes Participants will develop a shared vision of a co-teaching classroom Participants will know supportive and destructive relationship habits Participants will plan for successful classroom management

21 Collaboration is… a voluntary relationship a joint responsibility an attempt to reach consensus a learning experience an ongoing relationship

22 ACTIVITY Draw and complete this chart on your paper: In a co-teaching classroom, we would: SeeNever See HearNever Hear FeelNever Feel

23 ACTIVITY Discussion Questions What areas did you find in common in the charts? Were there any areas of conflict? If there were areas of conflict, how will you address those?

24 Classroom Management Highly effective classrooms function as a family. What strategies can we use to promote a community of learners?

25 Relationship Relationship Builders: Breakers: Listening Supporting Encouraging Accepting Respecting Trusting Negotiating Criticizing Blaming Nagging Complaining Punishing Threatening Bribing/Rewarding

26 Classroom Management Decisions Classroom expectations Academic Behavioral Logical consequences for choices Agreement on handling of disruptions Degree of parent involvement

27 ACTIVITY Work with your co-teacher to complete the Guided Questions Activity Sheet on Classroom Management. Choose one response to share with the group.

28 + ∆ Helpful Enjoyable Appreciated Opportunities for improvement

29 Co-Teaching Preparation: Keys to Success Part III: Advantages, Disadvantages, and Assessment

30 Outcomes Participants will know advantages and disadvantages of co-teaching Participants will plan for successful student assessment practices

31 Advantages of Co-Teaching Teachers Learning with and from colleagues Less isolation Supportive environment Observe and participate in different teaching methods Easier to provide attention to individual students (Robinson and Schaible, 1995)

32 Advantages of Co-Teaching Students More likely to be exposed to more than one teaching style More individualized instruction Greater achievement Greater retention of content and skills Increase in regard for group work Improved interpersonal skills (Robinson and Schaible, 1995)

33 Disadvantages of Co-Teaching Teachers Time required for planning Possible conflicts with co-teacher

34 Disadvantages of Co-Teaching Students Larger class size may be difficult for some students Possible confusion as to who is in charge of classroom If co-teachers are incompatible, students will be uncomfortable (Robinson and Schaible, 1995)

35 Think/Pair/Share What do you see as the biggest advantage of co-teaching for teachers? Why? The biggest disadvantage for teachers? Why? What do you see as the biggest advantage of co-teaching for students? Why? The biggest disadvantage for students? Why?

36 Student Assessment Decisions Types of assessments Written Performance How often? Who will administer? How will evaluation be shared by co- teachers? How will results be shared with students? With parents?

37 ACTIVITY Work with your co-teacher to complete the Guided Questions Activity Sheet on Assessment. Choose one response to share with the group.

38 + ∆ Helpful Enjoyable Appreciated Opportunities for improvement


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