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1 “Disaster Lights” & “Disaster Heavies:” Relevant Emergency Preparedness Information for People with Disabilities [ILRU Webcast 2 Parts], 11/9,16/2007.

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Presentation on theme: "1 “Disaster Lights” & “Disaster Heavies:” Relevant Emergency Preparedness Information for People with Disabilities [ILRU Webcast 2 Parts], 11/9,16/2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 “Disaster Lights” & “Disaster Heavies:” Relevant Emergency Preparedness Information for People with Disabilities [ILRU Webcast 2 Parts], 11/9,16/2007

2 ,Fax:

3 June Isaacson Kailes Associate Director

4 Western University of Health Sciences Pomona, California Established 1998

5 CDIHP works to enhance health of people with disabilities through: –public policy, –consulting, –training, –research & –dissemination activities.

6 Outcome Doing a little is much better than doing nothing! Take small steps that move you toward better preparedness.

7 All Hazard Planning

8 Hazards Scale: large & small Frequency: high & low Risks: high & low

9 Name some hazards: Low Risk – High Frequency? Low Risk – Low Frequency? High Risk – Low Frequency? High Risk – High Frequency?

10 “Planners cannot foresee every outcome, & incident managers cannot anticipate every scenario. While disasters have a language of their own & no plan guarantees success, inadequate plans are proven contributors to failure.”

11 Lessons documented: Words are easy to write, Steps are easy to list, the doing, making it real, & sustaining it, is hard! The devil is in the detail!

12 Cover Making it real - “about & for us” vs. “with & by us!” Preparing - Why bother? Evaluating your skills Support teams Communication & Public Warning Plans Those dreaded drills Supplies & kits

13 Intended Outcomes Cultivate thinking regarding what you can do that is different from what you have been doing.

14 Intended Outcomes Recognize that emergency preparedness: –Is a life style choice, not a time limited project. –literacy & competencies need to be developed, practiced & woven into your culture, policies, procedures, & advocacy.

15 Your task today Make a specific priority list. What will you do in: –1 month? –2 months? –6 months? –Ongoing ?

16 Objectives Making Lessons Documented Real!

17 People with disabilities & activity limitations need relevant information

18 Some disability specific materials are: Vague Incomplete Impractical Naïve & Language used is: –outdated –condescending –offensive –perpetuates negative attitudes & false stereotypes

19 Preparedness materials for PWDAL Sometimes need to be augmented: –Some advice for general population is not always equally applicable.

20 Get Specific!

21 Wheelchair users are instructed to: “Show friends how to operate your wheelchair so they can move you if necessary. Make sure your friends know the size of your wheelchair in case it has to be transported.” FEMA’s Disaster Preparedness for People with Disabilities, 2003 Vague and incomplete!

22 Get Real!

23 confined to a wheelchairIf you are confined to a wheelchair, consider mounting a small “personal use” fire extinguisher in an accessible place on your wheelchair & become familiar with its use. Then, if you cannot “stop, drop, & roll” during a fire, you should “pull, aim, squeeze, & sweep.” (Fire Risk Series published by the FEMA & US Fire Administration 1999)

24 Get Current!

25 Information must be easily available, through same means as other material is distributedInformation must be easily available, through same means as other material is distributed with specific & useful advice in accessible & usable formats &with specific & useful advice in accessible & usable formats & language.

26 Usable formats…. braille large print text (disk) audio appropriate for Non ‑ English speakers & people who have difficulty reading.

27 Develop emergency preparedness materials that integrates information re: PWDAL into general preparedness materials as well as inform readers how to access more customized materials.

28 Compile & distribute, & when not available, create customized preparedness materials that: –have specific content, useful & relevant to people with limitations in hearing, vision, mobility, speech, & cognition.

29 Specificity & detail Disability diversity perspective Written from disability experience Not about what people can do for us, but what we can do for ourselves! Easy to get Usable - alternative formats Materials need:

30 Use general & customized disability specific planning materials

31 Contact Your Local Emergency Information Management Office: Some local emergency management offices maintain registers of people with disabilities so you can be located & assisted quickly in a disaster.

32 Consider getting a medical alert system that will allow you to call for help if you are immobilized in an emergency. Most alert systems require a working phone line, so have a back-up plan, such as a cell phone or pager, if the regular landlines are disrupted.

33 If you have an audio perceptual disability, work particularly hard to understand the environment. Watch body language so you will know when it’s a good time to ask a question of a shelter staff member or other occupant.”[9]

34 Since September 11th, many people with disabilities have expressed reluctance to depend on areas of refuge, wanting to evacuate with everyone else. This may not always be possible, so learn the location of your building’s designated refuge areas.

35 “If you do not own a vehicle or drive, find out in advance what your community’s plans for evacuating those without private transportation.” “Let your personal care attendant know you have registered, and with whom. If you are electric- dependent, be sure to register with your local utility company.”

36 Visit websites below for additional information: –Access Board –DHHS Administration on Aging –National Council on Disability –American Foundation for the Blind –National Association of the Deaf –Easter Seals

37 So speak up! We need relevant information

38 Why Prepare Increase confidence Know what to do Be calm Stay in charge Protect your self

39 4 Stages of Disaster Denial 1.It won’t happen here. 2.Even if it happens here, it won’t happen to me. 3.Even if it happens to me, it won’t be that bad. 4.Even if it’s that bad, there’s nothing I could have done about it anyway. Eric Holdeman, Director of Emergency Management, Seattle's King County

40 Lessons documented: Words are easy to write, Steps are easy to list, the doing, making it real, & sustaining it, is hard! The devil is in the detail!

41 91% of Americans live in places at moderate-to-high risk of:  earthquakes,  volcanoes,  tornadoes,  wildfires,  hurricanes,  flooding,  high-wind damage or  terrorism.

42 Fact: Like it or not you will be involved -- plan now or suffer & muddle through later!

43 Most important message! Avoid Avoidance

44 How many of you have at least one family member with disability? Ability Self- assessment

45 Learn What You Can And Can Not Do Self Test

46 Establish Support Teams

47 Rethink and Update Buddy Systems Training one person to assist in an emergency ! What’s wrong with the buddy system

48 Rethink & Update Buddy Systems Training one person to assist in an emergency Major weaknesses: PERSON & LOCATION DEPENDENT! Person may be absent You may be in area different from usual location You may be at site after regular hours when buddy not available

49 Trash the Buddy System!

50 Support Teams people who will help you in an emergency as needed. should be people who are regularly in same area as you.

51 Universal Team Approach If everyone is trained, everyone can help! Everyone knows what to do!

52 Establish Support Team Establish support relationships with many individuals. At each location where spend significant part of day: –Job –Home –School –Volunteer site

53 Establish Support Teams Place a quarterly reminder on calendar to check and update your support teams

54 Establish Support Teams Conduct practice sessions to ensure individuals you choose are capable of offering assistance you need: –i.e.: strong enough, –can communicate clearly, –can guide you safely. Know how you will instantly create a support team

55 Establish Support Teams Know how you will instantly create a support team

56 Master Skill of Giving Quick Information on How to Best Assist Clear, concise: Take my oxygen tank. –Additional information (if needed): Right side of green bookcase I can breath without it for 15 minutes Take my communication device from table, I’m also hard of hearing. Take my manual wheelchair. The traditional "fire fighter's carry" is hazardous for me because of my respiratory condition. Carry me by...

57 Master Skill of Giving Quick Information on How to Best Assist Clear, concise: I can manage steps independently, carry my other crutch & walk in front of me. I need to hang on to you, I have poor balance, but I can walk steps.

58 58 Communication

59 Plan Multiple Ways to Give & Get Information TV Radio Cell phone Standard phone –no electricity needed Pagers Internet Text messaging Low cost two – way radios

60 Emergency Plans

61 Plans Home Neighborhood Work School

62 How many of you have at least one family member with disability? Planning questions

63 Plan for all events: Evacuate –Need to remain in immediate area –Need to leave area Shelter in Place

64 If you need to stay in your home for several days (in your home, at school, or at work) what medications, diet, & other emergency supplies would you need? What would you do if you were without power & water? What evacuation assistance might you need & where could you get it?

65 How many of you have at least one family member with disability? Be realistic!

66 Determine & Prioritize All Evacuation Options Being Carried Use of Evacuation Chairs Area of Refuge/Rescue Assistance Use of Elevators

67 NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 1. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 2. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 3. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 4. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 5. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 6. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 7. PHONE (WORK) FAX Keep List of Out-of-state Contacts Friends or relatives Include people outside affected List contacts in priority order (1st first person reached calls others on list to let them know you are ok.) Give everyone on list a copy of list.

68 Power Issues

69 Devices That Use Rechargeable Batteries Plan how you will recharge batteries if electricity is out. Check with vendor/supplier to see if there are alternative ways to charge batteries.

70 NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 1. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 2. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 3. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 4. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 5. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 6. PHONE (WORK) FAX NAMEPHONE (HOME)CELLE- MAILADDRESS 7. PHONE (WORK) FAX Life-Support Devices That Depend On Electricity Contact local electric company regarding "priority reconnection service." Even with "priority reconnection service,” power could still be out for many days. Vital to have power backup options for equipment. Talk to equipment suppliers about options.

71  The following can be found at: CLICK - on NEW:  Emergency Power Planning for People Who Use Electricity and Battery Dependent Assistive Technology and Medical Devices Reading:

72 DRILLS To know it, is to do it

73 Emergency Plan Coordinators Practice plans: – through regular drills – use of all exits – using evacuation devices with intended users

74 Are people with disabilities & activity limitations who are at site included in: Creating Plan? Reviewing Plan? Practicing Plan? Updating Plan?

75 Practice Plans through Regular Drills Increases skills Instills confidence

76 Practice & drills consist of: walk through procedures, announced drills, surprise drills.

77 Walk Through Procedures Devote portions of staff meetings to discuss & practice parts of plan. Concentrate efforts on particular parts of plan & particular individuals requiring more extensive practice like: –Practicing evacuation techniques, –use of evacuation devices, –methods of transferring in & out of them, –carrying techniques, –use of two-way communication systems in areas of rescue. Critical that fire wardens are involved.

78 Announced Drills Help identify crucial coordination activities & communication links. Good time to practice: –communicating emergency information to people w/ vision & hearing loss, –coping w/ different scenarios & unforeseen situations such as blocked paths or exits.

79 Surprise Drills 2-3 times a year, different times of day & different shifts. Include realistic elements (e.g., blocked paths or exits). Evaluate performance & feedback given to all participants. Make plan revisions & updates after these evaluations.

80 SUPPLIES

81 81 YOYO 3? YOYO 5 / 7

82 Kits Carry on you Grab & go Home Bedside

83 Carry on you essential items you need to keep with you at all times

84 ICE In case of emergency

85 Grab and go kit easy-to-carry can grab if you have to leave home (or school, workplace, etc.) in a hurry. have things you cannot do without but are not so large cannot manage them.

86 Home Kit  large kit  water, food, first aid supplies, clothing, bedding, tools,  disability-specific items.  things you would most need if you had to be self-sufficient for days either at home or in an evacuation shelter.

87 Bedside Kit  items you will need if you are trapped in or near bed & unable to get to other parts of your home.

88 What to do first? Do not need to do everything all at once Do a little at a time, so by the end of six months you have all or most of your plan completed &supplies collected.

89 If you always do what you always did, you always get what you always got. Is that enough?

90 "Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do." Goethe

91 So…it’s Your health Your safely Your choice Your call Your life!

92 Please complete Workshop Evaluation THANK YOU

93 Attend to your plan’s: Specificity Usability Up to date Records protection Agreements Communication Supplies Evacuation Drills / Training

94 94 If you always do what you always did, you always get what you always got. Is that enough?

95 95 "Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do." Goethe

96 So…it’s Your Responsibility Your health Your safely Your choice Your call Your life!

97  The following can be found at: CLICK - on NEW:  Emergency Preparedness: Taking Responsibility For Your Safety - Tips for People with Activity Limitations and Disabilities (Written by Kailes & Wallrich for the Los Angeles County).  Emergency Power Planning for People Who Use Electricity and Battery Dependent Assistive Technology and Medical Devices Readings:

98 –Products –Emergency Safety Information

99

100  Emergency Evacuation Preparedness: Taking Responsibility for Your Safety - A Guide for People with Disabilities and Other Activity Limitations

101 –Products –Emergency Health Information

102 –Products –Evacuation Preparedness


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