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How to Write a Literary Analysis -The Miracle Worker By Lily Chen.

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Presentation on theme: "How to Write a Literary Analysis -The Miracle Worker By Lily Chen."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Write a Literary Analysis -The Miracle Worker By Lily Chen

2 What a Literary Analysis is…and is not A Literary Analysis is not a simple story summary; it goes beyond a summary. A Literary Analysis is not a simple story summary; it goes beyond a summary. A good literary analysis essay will include retelling of the essential parts of a story. A good literary analysis essay will include retelling of the essential parts of a story. It explains piece by piece the big events and smaller details using the literary terminology. It explains piece by piece the big events and smaller details using the literary terminology.

3 Thesis Statement Included Tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion. Tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion. Is a road map (what to expect). Is a road map (what to expect). Directly answers the question asked of you. Directly answers the question asked of you. Makes a claim that others might dispute. Makes a claim that others might dispute. Is usually a single sentence somewhere in your first paragraph that presents your argument to the reader. Is usually a single sentence somewhere in your first paragraph that presents your argument to the reader. Source: Source:

4 The Miracle Worker Theme Analysis Chose from: Theme A: Pity can interfere with the discipline that learning requires. Theme A: Pity can interfere with the discipline that learning requires.or Theme B: Communication is extremely important in human relationships. Theme B: Communication is extremely important in human relationships.

5 Sample Thesis Statement: Pity can be detrimental in the process of disciplinary learning because discipline is an essential part of learning right from wrong. Pity can be detrimental in the process of disciplinary learning because discipline is an essential part of learning right from wrong. -- Kevin from period 6 Communication is crucial in every relationship; without it, the partnership will slowly fall apart. Communication is crucial in every relationship; without it, the partnership will slowly fall apart. -- Samer from period 4

6 Essay Tips Never write the following statements: “In this essay I will…” “In this essay I will…” “I will first describe…and then I will…” “I will first describe…and then I will…” “When I think about …” “When I think about …” “You will read about…” “You will read about…” No personal opinions No personal opinions In a literary analysis avoiding “I” and “you” is most effective In a literary analysis avoiding “I” and “you” is most effective

7 Paragraph 1 Sample Structure a. Opener/Grabber-- Grab the reader’s attention with the first line. You can do this with an action, a deep thought or question, a vivid description, or a dialogue. b. Orient Reader—in 1-3 sentences, identify the title, author, and subject of the movie/book. Don’t summarize the whole movie/book in detail. Write just enough as if to assume the reader knows nothing yet about the movie/book. c. Thesis—Your interpretation of the theme/subject. Sources cited:

8 Paragraph 1 Sample “A once in a lifetime vacation” may describe an exotic far away destination, traveling extensively, and exploring the unfamiliar. The short story “Zoo”, written by Edward Hoch, gives the reader a surprising twist on a vacation through character points of view. The irony at the end makes the reader think twice about the elusive Professor Hugo’s actions and motives. In “Zoo”, Hoch is making a point about accepting and exploring the unknown in a light-hearted, humorous tone. “A once in a lifetime vacation” may describe an exotic far away destination, traveling extensively, and exploring the unfamiliar. The short story “Zoo”, written by Edward Hoch, gives the reader a surprising twist on a vacation through character points of view. The irony at the end makes the reader think twice about the elusive Professor Hugo’s actions and motives. In “Zoo”, Hoch is making a point about accepting and exploring the unknown in a light-hearted, humorous tone.

9 Can You Identify? Which sentence was the thesis? Which sentence was the thesis? Which sentences described the story? Which sentences described the story? Which sentence was the opener? Which sentence was the opener? (1)“A once in a lifetime vacation” may describe an exotic far away destination, traveling extensively, and exploring the unfamiliar. (2)The short story “Zoo”, written by Edward Hoch, gives the reader a surprising twist on a vacation through character points of view. (3)The irony at the end makes the reader think twice about the elusive Professor Hugo’s actions and motives. (4) In “Zoo”, Hoch is making a point about accepting and exploring the unknown in a light- hearted, humorous tone. (1)“A once in a lifetime vacation” may describe an exotic far away destination, traveling extensively, and exploring the unfamiliar. (2)The short story “Zoo”, written by Edward Hoch, gives the reader a surprising twist on a vacation through character points of view. (3)The irony at the end makes the reader think twice about the elusive Professor Hugo’s actions and motives. (4) In “Zoo”, Hoch is making a point about accepting and exploring the unknown in a light- hearted, humorous tone.

10 Question 4 (4) In “Zoo”, Hoch is making a point about accepting and exploring the unknown in a light-hearted, humorous tone. (4) In “Zoo”, Hoch is making a point about accepting and exploring the unknown in a light-hearted, humorous tone. This sentence is the: A. Opener/Grabber B. Story description C. Thesis

11 Question 5 (2)The short story “Zoo”, written by Edward Hoch, gives the reader a surprising twist on a vacation through character points of view. (3)The irony at the end makes the reader think twice about the elusive Professor Hugo’s actions and motives. (2)The short story “Zoo”, written by Edward Hoch, gives the reader a surprising twist on a vacation through character points of view. (3)The irony at the end makes the reader think twice about the elusive Professor Hugo’s actions and motives. These sentences are the: A. Opener/Grabber B. Story description C. Thesis

12 Question 6 (1)“A once in a lifetime vacation” may describe an exotic far away destination, traveling extensively, and exploring the unfamiliar. (1)“A once in a lifetime vacation” may describe an exotic far away destination, traveling extensively, and exploring the unfamiliar. This sentence is the: A. Opener/Grabber B. Story description C. Thesis

13 Supporting Paragraphs (Part II) Must include: A. Evidence/events- 1 event per paragraph* B. What happened C. Quotes D. Additional relevant information E. Connection back to the thesis *Introducing a new event means introducing a new paragraph

14 Supporting paragraph sample Each summer, Professor Hugo brings his Interplanetary Zoo to cities all around Earth. For a mere dollar, humans can catch a glimpse of “three-legged creatures from Venus, or tall, thin men from Mars, or even snake-like horrors from somewhere distant.” Earthlings seem both horrified and overjoyed at the sight of the barred cages, which contain the “little known horse-spider people of Kaan.” Hoch’s writing in the third person point of view allows the reader to know how the human characters are thinking and feeling. It is obvious that the people of Earth are more than thrilled to accept the unknown species. Each summer, Professor Hugo brings his Interplanetary Zoo to cities all around Earth. For a mere dollar, humans can catch a glimpse of “three-legged creatures from Venus, or tall, thin men from Mars, or even snake-like horrors from somewhere distant.” Earthlings seem both horrified and overjoyed at the sight of the barred cages, which contain the “little known horse-spider people of Kaan.” Hoch’s writing in the third person point of view allows the reader to know how the human characters are thinking and feeling. It is obvious that the people of Earth are more than thrilled to accept the unknown species.

15 Supporting Paragraph Break Down Each summer, Professor Hugo brings his Interplanetary Zoo to cities all around Earth. (Evidence/Event) For a mere dollar, humans can catch a glimpse of “three-legged creatures from Venus, or tall, thin men from Mars, or even snake-like horrors from somewhere distant.” Earthlings seem both horrified and overjoyed at the sight of the barred cages, which contain the “little known horse-spider people of Kaan.” (What happened with story quotes). Hoch’s writing in the third person point of view allows the reader to know how the human characters are thinking and feeling. (Adds additional info) It is obvious that the people of Earth are more than thrilled to accept the unknown species. (Connects back to thesis) Each summer, Professor Hugo brings his Interplanetary Zoo to cities all around Earth. (Evidence/Event) For a mere dollar, humans can catch a glimpse of “three-legged creatures from Venus, or tall, thin men from Mars, or even snake-like horrors from somewhere distant.” Earthlings seem both horrified and overjoyed at the sight of the barred cages, which contain the “little known horse-spider people of Kaan.” (What happened with story quotes). Hoch’s writing in the third person point of view allows the reader to know how the human characters are thinking and feeling. (Adds additional info) It is obvious that the people of Earth are more than thrilled to accept the unknown species. (Connects back to thesis)

16 Supporting Paragraph 2 Sample “Zoo’s” setting changes two months later to the jagged rocks of Kaan where the horse-spider inhabitants anxiously return home. The point of view has also changed to reflect the thoughts and feelings of these creatures, who admitted they enjoyed the trip. A moment of suspense arises when the “she-creature” asks the “he-creature” if they felt any danger on the journey, especially “on a place called Earth.” The ironic reply shocked the reader when the “he-creature” stated, “There are bars to protect us from them.” Like the Earthlings, the horse-spider people of Kaan were eager to explore the unknown world. “Zoo’s” setting changes two months later to the jagged rocks of Kaan where the horse-spider inhabitants anxiously return home. The point of view has also changed to reflect the thoughts and feelings of these creatures, who admitted they enjoyed the trip. A moment of suspense arises when the “she-creature” asks the “he-creature” if they felt any danger on the journey, especially “on a place called Earth.” The ironic reply shocked the reader when the “he-creature” stated, “There are bars to protect us from them.” Like the Earthlings, the horse-spider people of Kaan were eager to explore the unknown world.

17 Supporting Paragraph Break Down Your Turn “Zoo’s” setting changes two months later to the jagged rocks of Kaan where the horse-spider inhabitants anxiously return home. ( ) The point of view has also changed to reflect the thoughts and feelings of these creatures, who admitted they enjoyed the trip. “Zoo’s” setting changes two months later to the jagged rocks of Kaan where the horse-spider inhabitants anxiously return home. ( ) The point of view has also changed to reflect the thoughts and feelings of these creatures, who admitted they enjoyed the trip. ( ) A moment of suspense arises when the “she- creature” asks the “he-creature” if they felt any danger on the journey, especially “on a place called Earth.” The ironic reply shocked the reader when the “he-creature” stated, “There are bars to protect us from them.” ( ) Like the Earthlings, the horse-spider people of Kaan were eager to explore the unknown world. ( ) ( ) A moment of suspense arises when the “she- creature” asks the “he-creature” if they felt any danger on the journey, especially “on a place called Earth.” The ironic reply shocked the reader when the “he-creature” stated, “There are bars to protect us from them.” ( ) Like the Earthlings, the horse-spider people of Kaan were eager to explore the unknown world. ( )

18 Were You Correct? “Zoo’s” setting changes two months later to the jagged rocks of Kaan where the horse-spider inhabitants anxiously return home. (Evidence/Event) The point of view has also changed to reflect the thoughts and feelings of these creatures, who admitted they enjoyed the trip. (Additional relevant info) A moment of suspense arises when the “she-creature” asks the “he- creature” if they felt any danger on the journey, especially “on a place called Earth.” The ironic reply shocked the reader when the “he-creature” stated, “There are bars to protect us from them.” (What happened w/quotes) Like the Earthlings, the horse- spider people of Kaan were eager to explore the unknown world. (Connect to thesis) “Zoo’s” setting changes two months later to the jagged rocks of Kaan where the horse-spider inhabitants anxiously return home. (Evidence/Event) The point of view has also changed to reflect the thoughts and feelings of these creatures, who admitted they enjoyed the trip. (Additional relevant info) A moment of suspense arises when the “she-creature” asks the “he- creature” if they felt any danger on the journey, especially “on a place called Earth.” The ironic reply shocked the reader when the “he-creature” stated, “There are bars to protect us from them.” (What happened w/quotes) Like the Earthlings, the horse- spider people of Kaan were eager to explore the unknown world. (Connect to thesis)

19 3 rd Sample Supporting Paragraph While Professor Hugo is portrayed as a cheerful, friendly character, the reader learns that he might also be viewed as a sneaky businessman. ( ) The reader may come to this conclusion upon the horse-spider’s statement, “It is well worth the nineteen commocs it costs.” It is apparent that Professor Hugo charges humans to view the horse-spider creatures, and the professor charges the horse-spider creatures to go on an interplanetary vacation.( ) The additional irony to the story enhances the resolution to the plot.( ) Professor Hugo not only explores and accepts the unknown, he also exploits each species. ( ) While Professor Hugo is portrayed as a cheerful, friendly character, the reader learns that he might also be viewed as a sneaky businessman. ( ) The reader may come to this conclusion upon the horse-spider’s statement, “It is well worth the nineteen commocs it costs.” It is apparent that Professor Hugo charges humans to view the horse-spider creatures, and the professor charges the horse-spider creatures to go on an interplanetary vacation.( ) The additional irony to the story enhances the resolution to the plot.( ) Professor Hugo not only explores and accepts the unknown, he also exploits each species. ( )

20 Time to Write Your Supporting Paragraphs Must include: A. Evidence/events- 1 event per paragraph* B. What happened C. Quotes D. Additional relevant information E. Connection back to the thesis *Introducing a new event means introducing a new paragraph Sources cited:

21 Concluding Paragraph (Part III) A. Restate title of story and mention of author’s name B. Description of what the reader gains from story C. How thesis and theme transcends the entire essay D. Any additional, relevant statement to enhance and conclude the essay

22 Concluding Paragraph Sample Reading a short story like “Zoo” may seem like a quick way to pass a few minutes. By breaking down the story and analyzing piece by piece, the reader gains a greater appreciation for Hoch’s simple two-page piece. Perhaps the author himself was seeking a way to reach the unknown. Reading a short story like “Zoo” may seem like a quick way to pass a few minutes. By breaking down the story and analyzing piece by piece, the reader gains a greater appreciation for Hoch’s simple two-page piece. Perhaps the author himself was seeking a way to reach the unknown.

23 Concluding Paragraph Breakdown Reading a short story like “Zoo” may seem like a quick way to pass a few minutes. (Story name) By breaking down the story and analyzing piece by piece, the reader gains a greater appreciation for Hoch’s simple two-page piece. (Author’s name, what reader gains) Perhaps the author himself was seeking a way to reach the unknown. (final connection to thesis) Reading a short story like “Zoo” may seem like a quick way to pass a few minutes. (Story name) By breaking down the story and analyzing piece by piece, the reader gains a greater appreciation for Hoch’s simple two-page piece. (Author’s name, what reader gains) Perhaps the author himself was seeking a way to reach the unknown. (final connection to thesis)


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